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Due to the comprehensive nature of the material, we are offering the book in three volumes for flexibility and efficiency.

Coverage and scope

Our University Physics textbook adheres to the scope and sequence of most two- and three-semester physics courses nationwide. We have worked to make physics interesting and accessible to students while maintaining the mathematical rigor inherent in the subject. With this objective in mind, the content of this textbook has been developed and arranged to provide a logical progression from fundamental to more advanced concepts, building upon what students have already learned and emphasizing connections between topics and between theory and applications. The goal of each section is to enable students not just to recognize concepts, but to work with them in ways that will be useful in later courses and future careers. The organization and pedagogical features were developed and vetted with feedback from science educators dedicated to the project.

VOLUME I

Unit 1: Mechanics

  • Chapter 1: Units and Measurement
  • Chapter 2: Vectors
  • Chapter 3: Motion Along a Straight Line
  • Chapter 4: Motion in Two and Three Dimensions
  • Chapter 5: Newton’s Laws of Motion
  • Chapter 6: Applications of Newton’s Laws
  • Chapter 7: Work and Kinetic Energy
  • Chapter 8: Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy
  • Chapter 9: Linear Momentum and Collisions
  • Chapter 10: Fixed-Axis Rotation
  • Chapter 11: Angular Momentum
  • Chapter 12: Static Equilibrium and Elasticity
  • Chapter 13: Gravitation
  • Chapter 14: Fluid Mechanics

Unit 2: Waves and Acoustics

  • Chapter 15: Oscillations
  • Chapter 16: Waves
  • Chapter 17: Sound

VOLUME II

Unit 1: Thermodynamics

  • Chapter 1: Temperature and Heat
  • Chapter 2: The Kinetic Theory of Gases
  • Chapter 3: The First Law of Thermodynamics
  • Chapter 4: The Second Law of Thermodynamics

Unit 2: Electricity and Magnetism

  • Chapter 5: Electric Charges and Fields
  • Chapter 6: Gauss’s Law
  • Chapter 7: Electric Potential
  • Chapter 8: Capacitance
  • Chapter 9: Current and Resistance
  • Chapter 10: Direct-Current Circuits
  • Chapter 11: Magnetic Forces and Fields
  • Chapter 12: Sources of Magnetic Fields
  • Chapter 13: Electromagnetic Induction
  • Chapter 14: Inductance
  • Chapter 15: Alternating-Current Circuits
  • Chapter 16: Electromagnetic Waves

VOLUME III

Unit 1: Optics

  • Chapter 1: The Nature of Light
  • Chapter 2: Geometric Optics and Image Formation
  • Chapter 3: Interference
  • Chapter 4: Diffraction

Unit 2: Modern Physics

  • Chapter 5: Relativity
  • Chapter 6: Photons and Matter Waves
  • Chapter 7: Quantum Mechanics
  • Chapter 8: Atomic Structure
  • Chapter 9: Condensed Matter Physics
  • Chapter 10: Nuclear Physics
  • Chapter 11: Particle Physics and Cosmology

Pedagogical foundation

Throughout University Physics you will find derivations of concepts that present classical ideas and techniques, as well as modern applications and methods. Most chapters start with observations or experiments that place the material in a context of physical experience. Presentations and explanations rely on years of classroom experience on the part of long-time physics professors, striving for a balance of clarity and rigor that has proven successful with their students. Throughout the text, links enable students to review earlier material and then return to the present discussion, reinforcing connections between topics. Key historical figures and experiments are discussed in the main text (rather than in boxes or sidebars), maintaining a focus on the development of physical intuition. Key ideas, definitions, and equations are highlighted in the text and listed in summary form at the end of each chapter. Examples and chapter-opening images often include contemporary applications from daily life or modern science and engineering that students can relate to, from smart phones to the internet to GPS devices.

Questions & Answers

Is there any calculation for line integral in scalar feild?
Sadia Reply
what is thrust
Aarti Reply
when an object is immersed in liquid, it experiences an upward force which is called as upthrust.
Phanindra
@Phanindra Thapa No, that is buoyancy that you're talking about...
Shii
thrust is simply a push
Shii
it is a force that is exerted by liquid.
Phanindra
what is the difference between upthrust and buoyancy?
misbah
The force exerted by a liquid is called buoyancy. not thrust. there are many different types of thrust and I think you should Google it instead of asking here.
Sharath
hey Kumar, don't discourage somebody like that. I think this conversation is all about discussion...remember that the more we discuss the more we know...
festus
thrust is an upward force acting on an object immersed in a liquid.
festus
uptrust and buoyancy are the same
akanbi
the question isn't asking about up thrust. he simply asked what is thrust
Shii
a Thrust is simply a push
Shii
how did astromers neasure the mass of earth and sun
papillas Reply
wats the simplest and shortest formula to calc. for order of magnitude
papillas
Distinguish between steamline and turbulent flow with at least one example of each
Aarti Reply
what is newtons first law
Theodore Reply
It state that an object in rest will continue to remain in rest or an object in motion will continue to remain in motion except resultant(unbalanced force) force act on it
Gerald
Thanks Gerald Fokumla
Theodore
Your welcome
Gerald
it states that a body remains in its state of rest or uniform motion unless acted upon by resultant external force.
festus
it that a body continues to be in a state of rest or in straight line in a motion unless there is an external force acting on it
Usman
derive the relation above
jeba Reply
formula for find angular velocity
Mark Reply
w=v^2/r
Eric
Why satellites don't fall on earth? Reason?
Abdur Reply
because space doesn't have gravity
Evelyn
satellites technically fall to earth but they travel parallel to earth so fast that they orbit instead if falling(plus the gravity is also weaker in the orbit). its a circular motion where the centripetal force is the weight due to gravity
Kameyama
Exactly everyone what is gravity?
Tebogo Reply
the force that attrats a body towards the center of earth,or towards any other physical body having mass
hina
That force which attracts or pulls two objects to each other. A body having mass has gravitational pull. If the object is bigger in mass then it's gravitational pull would be stronger.For Example earth have gravitational pull on other objects that is why we are pulled by earth.
Abdur
Gravity is the force that act on a on body to the center of the earth.
Aguenim
what are the application of 2nd law
Sana Reply
It's applicable when determining the amount of force needed to make a body to move or to stop a moving body
festus
coplanar force system
Alex Reply
how did you get 7.50times
Cole Reply
6
Mharsheeraz
what is a frame of reference
PUSELETSO Reply
0.88
Mharsheeraz
0.88
Iize
The system of geometric axis in relation to which measurement of Size, Position, or , Motion can be made. It has two types; 1) Inertial Reference Frame 2) Non Inertial Reference Frame
Abdur
what is science
Lloyd Reply
What is Matter?
Lloyd
what is black body radiations?
mu
matter is anything having some mass and occupies some volume
Debi
a black body radiation it the radiation that absorbs all the EM radiation
Evans
is anything that occuple space
Diamond
I'm new here...I wana askng u how can I prepare any typ of test of atomic energy
gull
What is inertia of bank curve
Sunny
I wanna ask the different between coloumbs law and gravitational law of force
Femi
how do you got 27.8 m/s? please explain
Yusuf Reply

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Source:  OpenStax, University physics volume 1. OpenStax CNX. Sep 19, 2016 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col12031/1.5
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