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This is a photo of a plate with a large pile of eggs in the foreground and six slices of toast in the background. There is a small dish of red jam sitting near the toast on the plate.
If you want to test a claim that involves two groups (the types of breakfasts eaten east and west of the Mississippi River) you can use a slightly different technique when conducting a hypothesis test. (credit: Chloe Lim)

Chapter objectives

By the end of this chapter, the student should be able to:

  • Classify hypothesis tests by type.
  • Conduct and interpret hypothesis tests for two population means, population standard deviations known.
  • Conduct and interpret hypothesis tests for two population means, population standard deviations unknown.
  • Conduct and interpret hypothesis tests for two population proportions.
  • Conduct and interpret hypothesis tests for matched or paired samples.

Studies often compare two groups. For example, researchers are interested in the effect aspirin has in preventing heart attacks. Over the last few years, newspapers and magazines have reported various aspirin studies involving two groups. Typically, one group is given aspirin and the other group is given a placebo. Then, the heart attack rate is studied over several years.

There are other situations that deal with the comparison of two groups. For example, studies compare various diet and exercise programs. Politicians compare the proportion of individuals from different income brackets who might vote for them. Students are interested in whether SAT or GRE preparatory courses really help raise their scores.

You have learned to conduct hypothesis tests on single means and single proportions. You will expand upon that in this chapter. You will compare two means or two proportions to each other. The general procedure is still the same, just expanded.

To compare two means or two proportions, you work with two groups. The groups are classified either as independent or matched pairs . Independent groups consist of two samples that are independent, that is, sample values selected from one population are not related in any way to sample values selected from the other population. Matched pairs consist of two samples that are dependent. The parameter tested using matched pairs is the population mean. The parameters tested using independent groups are either population means or population proportions.

Note

This chapter relies on either a calculator or a computer to calculate the degrees of freedom, the test statistics, and p -values. TI-83+ and TI-84 instructions are included as well as the test statistic formulas. When using a TI-83+ or TI-84 calculator, we do not need to separate two population means, independent groups, or population variances unknown into large and small sample sizes. However, most statistical computer software has the ability to differentiate these tests.


This chapter deals with the following hypothesis tests:

    Independent groups (samples are independent)

  • Test of two population means.
  • Test of two population proportions.

    Matched or paired samples (samples are dependent)

  • Test of the two population proportions by testing one population mean of differences.

Questions & Answers

pls I need understand this statistics very will is giving me problem
Bolanle Reply
Sixty-four third year high school students were given a standardized reading comprehension test. The mean and standard deviation obtained were 52.27 and 8.24, respectively. Is the mean significantly different from the population mean of 50? Use the 5% level of significance.
Daryl Reply
No
Ariel
how do I find the modal class
Bruce Reply
look for the highest occuring number in the class
Kusi
the probability of an event occuring is defined as?
James Reply
The probability of an even occurring is expected event÷ event being cancelled or event occurring / event not occurring
Gokuna
what is simple bar chat
Toyin Reply
Simple Bar Chart is a Diagram which shows the data values in form of horizontal bars. It shows categories along y-axis and values along x-axis. The x-axis displays above the bars and y-axis displays on left of the bars with the bars extending to the right side according to their values.
Muhammad
statistics is percentage only
Moha Reply
the first word is chance for that we use percentages
muhammad
it is not at all that statistics is a percentage only
Shambhavi
I need more examples
Luwam Reply
how to calculate sample needed
Jim Reply
mole of sample/mole ratio or Va Vb
Gokuna
how to I solve for arithmetic mean
Joe Reply
Yeah. for you to say.
James
yes
niharu
how do I solve for arithmetic mean
Joe Reply
please answer these questions
niharu
add all the data and divide by the number of data sets. For example, if test scores were 70, 60, 70, 80 the total is 280 and the total data sets referred to as N is 4. Therfore the mean or arthritmatic average is 70. I hope this helps.
Jim
*Tan A - Tan B = sin(A-B)/CosA CosB ... *2sinQ/Cos 3Q = tan 3Q - tan Q
Ibraheem Reply
standard error of sample
Umar Reply
what is subjective probability
Avela Reply
how to calculate the Steadman rank correlation
David
what is sampling? i want to know about the definition of sampling.
anup Reply
what is sample...?
Abdul Reply
In terms of Statistics or Research , It is a subset of population for measurement.
Da

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Source:  OpenStax, Introductory statistics. OpenStax CNX. May 06, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11562/1.18
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