<< Chapter < Page Chapter >> Page >
Graphs of pressure versus volume at six different temperatures, T one through T five and T critical. T one is the lowest temperature and T five is the highest. T critical is in the middle. Graphs show that pressure per unit volume is greater for greater temperatures. Pressure decreases with increasing volume for all temperatures, except at low temperatures when pressure is constant with increasing volume during a phase change.
PV size 12{ ital "PV"} {} diagrams. (a) Each curve (isotherm) represents the relationship between P size 12{P} {} and V size 12{V} {} at a fixed temperature; the upper curves are at higher temperatures. The lower curves are not hyperbolas, because the gas is no longer an ideal gas. (b) An expanded portion of the PV size 12{ ital "PV"} {} diagram for low temperatures, where the phase can change from a gas to a liquid. The term “vapor” refers to the gas phase when it exists at a temperature below the boiling temperature.
Critical temperatures and pressures
Substance Critical temperature Critical pressure
K size 12{K} {} º C size 12{°C} {} Pa size 12{"Pa"} {} atm size 12{"atm"} {}
Water 647.4 374.3 22 . 12 × 10 6 size 12{"22" "." "12"×"10" rSup { size 8{6} } } {} 219.0
Sulfur dioxide 430.7 157.6 7 . 88 × 10 6 size 12{7 "." "88" times "10" rSup { size 8{6} } } {} 78.0
Ammonia 405.5 132.4 11 . 28 × 10 6 size 12{"11" "." "28"×"10" rSup { size 8{6} } } {} 111.7
Carbon dioxide 304.2 31.1 7 . 39 × 10 6 size 12{7 "." "39"×"10" rSup { size 8{6} } } {} 73.2
Oxygen 154.8 −118.4 5 . 08 × 10 6 size 12{5 "." "08"×"10" rSup { size 8{6} } } {} 50.3
Nitrogen 126.2 −146.9 3 . 39 × 10 6 size 12{3 "." "39"×"10" rSup { size 8{6} } } {} 33.6
Hydrogen 33.3 −239.9 1 . 30 × 10 6 size 12{1 "." "30"×"10" rSup { size 8{6} } } {} 12.9
Helium 5.3 −267.9 0 . 229 × 10 6 size 12{0 "." "229" times "10" rSup { size 8{6} } } {} 2.27

Phase diagrams

The plots of pressure versus temperatures provide considerable insight into thermal properties of substances. There are well-defined regions on these graphs that correspond to various phases of matter, so PT size 12{ ital "PT"} {} graphs are called phase diagrams . [link] shows the phase diagram for water. Using the graph, if you know the pressure and temperature you can determine the phase of water. The solid lines—boundaries between phases—indicate temperatures and pressures at which the phases coexist (that is, they exist together in ratios, depending on pressure and temperature). For example, the boiling point of water is 100 º C size 12{"100"°C} {} at 1.00 atm. As the pressure increases, the boiling temperature rises steadily to 374 º C size 12{"374"°C} {} at a pressure of 218 atm. A pressure cooker (or even a covered pot) will cook food faster because the water can exist as a liquid at temperatures greater than 100 º C size 12{"100"°C} {} without all boiling away. The curve ends at a point called the critical point , because at higher temperatures the liquid phase does not exist at any pressure. The critical point occurs at the critical temperature, as you can see for water from [link] . The critical temperature for oxygen is 118 º C size 12{ +- "118"°C} {} , so oxygen cannot be liquefied above this temperature.

Graph of pressure versus temperature showing the boundaries of the three phases of water, along with the triple point and critical point. The triple point, where all three phases exist, is at 0 point 006 atmospheres and 0 point 01 degrees C. The critical point is at two hundred eighteen atmospheres and three hundred seventy four degrees C. Solid water is in the P T region generally to the left (lower temperature, lower or higher pressure, from the triple point). Liquid water is generally above and to the right of the triple point (higher pressure, higher temperature). The region of water vapor is to the lower right of the triple point (lower pressure and temperature to higher temperature and pressure).
The phase diagram ( PT size 12{ ital "PT"} {} graph) for water. Note that the axes are nonlinear and the graph is not to scale. This graph is simplified—there are several other exotic phases of ice at higher pressures.

Similarly, the curve between the solid and liquid regions in [link] gives the melting temperature at various pressures. For example, the melting point is 0 º C size 12{0°C} {} at 1.00 atm, as expected. Note that, at a fixed temperature, you can change the phase from solid (ice) to liquid (water) by increasing the pressure. Ice melts from pressure in the hands of a snowball maker. From the phase diagram, we can also say that the melting temperature of ice rises with increased pressure. When a car is driven over snow, the increased pressure from the tires melts the snowflakes; afterwards the water refreezes and forms an ice layer.

At sufficiently low pressures there is no liquid phase, but the substance can exist as either gas or solid. For water, there is no liquid phase at pressures below 0.00600 atm. The phase change from solid to gas is called sublimation    . It accounts for large losses of snow pack that never make it into a river, the routine automatic defrosting of a freezer, and the freeze-drying process applied to many foods. Carbon dioxide, on the other hand, sublimates at standard atmospheric pressure of 1 atm. (The solid form of CO 2 size 12{"CO" rSub { size 8{2} } } {} is known as dry ice because it does not melt. Instead, it moves directly from the solid to the gas state.)

Questions & Answers

a thick glass cup cracks when hot liquid is poured into it suddenly
Aiyelabegan Reply
because of the sudden contraction that takes place.
Eklu
railway crack has gap between the end of each length because?
Aiyelabegan Reply
For expansion
Eklu
yes
Aiyelabegan
Please i really find it dificult solving equations on physic, can anyone help me out?
Big Reply
sure
Carlee
what is the equation?
Carlee
Sure
Precious
fersnels biprism spectrometer how to determined
Bala Reply
how to study the hall effect to calculate the hall effect coefficient of the given semiconductor have to calculate the carrier density by carrier mobility.
Bala
what is the difference between atomic physics and momentum
Nana Reply
find the dimensional equation of work,power,and moment of a force show work?
Emmanuel Reply
What's sup guys
Peter
cul and you all
Okeh
cool you bro
Nana
so what is going on here
Nana
hello peeps
Joseph
Michelson Morley experiment
Riya Reply
how are you
Naveed
am good
Celine
you
Celine
hi
Bala
Hi
Ahmed
Calculate the final velocity attained, when a ball is given a velocity of 2.5m/s, acceleration of 0.67m/s² and reaches its point in 10s. Good luck!!!
Eklu Reply
2.68m/s
Doc
vf=vi+at vf=2.5+ 0.67*10 vf= 2.5 + 6.7 vf = 9.2
babar
s = vi t +1/2at sq s=58.5 s=v av X t vf= 9.2
babar
how 2.68
babar
v=u+at where v=final velocity u=initial velocity a=acceleration t=time
Eklu
the answer is 9.2m/s
OBERT
express your height in Cm
Emmanuel Reply
my project is Sol gel process how to prepare this process pls tell me
Bala
the dimension of work and energy is ML2T2 find the unit of work and energy hence drive for work?
Emmanuel Reply
KgM2S2
Acquah
Two bodies P and Quarter each of mass 1000g. Moved in the same direction with speed of 10m/s and 20m/s respectively. Calculate the impulse of P and Q obeying newton's 3rd law of motion
Shimolla Reply
kk
Doc
the answer is 0.03n according to the 3rd law of motion if the are in same direction meaning they interact each other.
OBERT
definition for wave?
Doc Reply
A disturbance that travel from one medium to another and without causing permanent change to its displacement
Fagbenro
In physics, a wave is a disturbance that transfers energy through matter or space, with little or no associated mass transport (Mass transfer). ... There are two main types ofwaves: mechanical and electromagnetic. Mechanicalwaves propagate through a physical matter, whose substance is being deformed
Devansh
K
Manyo
thanks jare
Doc
Thanks
AMADI
Note: LINEAR MOMENTUM Linear momentum is defined as the product of a system’s mass multiplied by its velocity: size 12{p=mv} {}
AMADI
what is physic
zalmia Reply
please gave me answar
zalmia
Study of matter and energy
Fagbenro
physics is the science of matter and energy and their interactions
Acquah
physics is the technology behind air and matter
Doc
Okay
William
hi sir
Bala
how easy to understanding physics sir
Bala
Easy to learn
William
31. Calculate the initial (from rest) acceleration of a proton in a 5.00×106 N/C electric field (such as created by a research Van de Graaff). Explicitly show how you follow the steps in the Problem-Solving Strategy for electrostatics.
Catina Reply
A tennis ball is projected at an angle and attains a range of 78. if the velocity is 30metres per second, calculate the angle
Shimolla
what friction
Wisdom Reply
question on friction
Wisdom
the rubbing of one object or surface against another.
author
momentum is the product of mass and it's velocity.
Algayawi
what are bioelements?
Edina
Friction is a force that exist between two objects in contact. e.g. friction between road and car tires.
Eklu

Get the best College physics course in your pocket!





Source:  OpenStax, College physics. OpenStax CNX. Jul 27, 2015 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11406/1.9
Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc.

Notification Switch

Would you like to follow the 'College physics' conversation and receive update notifications?

Ask