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ATP is a highly unstable molecule. Unless quickly used to perform work, ATP spontaneously dissociates into ADP + P i , and the free energy released during this process is lost as heat. The second question posed above, that is, how the energy released by ATP hydrolysis is used to perform work inside the cell, depends on a strategy called energy coupling. Cells couple the exergonic reaction of ATP hydrolysis with endergonic reactions, allowing them to proceed. One example of energy coupling using ATP involves a transmembrane ion pump that is extremely important for cellular function. This sodium-potassium pump (Na + /K + pump) drives sodium out of the cell and potassium into the cell ( [link] ). A large percentage of a cell’s ATP is spent powering this pump, because cellular processes bring a great deal of sodium into the cell and potassium out of the cell. The pump works constantly to stabilize cellular concentrations of sodium and potassium. In order for the pump to turn one cycle (exporting three Na+ ions and importing two K + ions), one molecule of ATP must be hydrolyzed. When ATP is hydrolyzed, its gamma phosphate doesn’t simply float away, but is actually transferred onto the pump protein. This process of a phosphate group binding to a molecule is called phosphorylation. As with most cases of ATP hydrolysis, a phosphate from ATP is transferred onto another molecule. In a phosphorylated state, the Na + /K + pump has more free energy and is triggered to undergo a conformational change. This change allows it to release Na + to the outside of the cell. It then binds extracellular K + , which, through another conformational change, causes the phosphate to detach from the pump. This release of phosphate triggers the K + to be released to the inside of the cell. Essentially, the energy released from the hydrolysis of ATP is coupled with the energy required to power the pump and transport Na + and K + ions. ATP performs cellular work using this basic form of energy coupling through phosphorylation.

Art connection

This illustration shows the sodium-potassium pump embedded in the cell membrane. ATP hydrolysis catalyzes a conformational change in the pump that allows sodium ions to move from the cytoplasmic side to the extracellular side of the membrane, and potassium ions to move from the extracellular side to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane as well.
The sodium-potassium pump is an example of energy coupling. The energy derived from exergonic ATP hydrolysis is used to pump sodium and potassium ions across the cell membrane.

The hydrolysis of one ATP molecule releases 7.3 kcal/mol of energy (∆G = −7.3 kcal/mol of energy). If it takes 2.1 kcal/mol of energy to move one Na + across the membrane (∆G = +2.1 kcal/mol of energy), how many sodium ions could be moved by the hydrolysis of one ATP molecule?

Often during cellular metabolic reactions, such as the synthesis and breakdown of nutrients, certain molecules must be altered slightly in their conformation to become substrates for the next step in the reaction series. One example is during the very first steps of cellular respiration, when a molecule of the sugar glucose is broken down in the process of glycolysis. In the first step of this process, ATP is required for the phosphorylation of glucose, creating a high-energy but unstable intermediate. This phosphorylation reaction powers a conformational change that allows the phosphorylated glucose molecule to be converted to the phosphorylated sugar fructose. Fructose is a necessary intermediate for glycolysis to move forward. Here, the exergonic reaction of ATP hydrolysis is coupled with the endergonic reaction of converting glucose into a phosphorylated intermediate in the pathway. Once again, the energy released by breaking a phosphate bond within ATP was used for the phosphorylation of another molecule, creating an unstable intermediate and powering an important conformational change.

See an interactive animation of the ATP-producing glycolysis process at this site .

Section summary

ATP is the primary energy-supplying molecule for living cells. ATP is made up of a nucleotide, a five-carbon sugar, and three phosphate groups. The bonds that connect the phosphates (phosphoanhydride bonds) have high-energy content. The energy released from the hydrolysis of ATP into ADP + P i is used to perform cellular work. Cells use ATP to perform work by coupling the exergonic reaction of ATP hydrolysis with endergonic reactions. ATP donates its phosphate group to another molecule via a process known as phosphorylation. The phosphorylated molecule is at a higher-energy state and is less stable than its unphosphorylated form, and this added energy from the addition of the phosphate allows the molecule to undergo its endergonic reaction.

Art connections

[link] The hydrolysis of one ATP molecule releases 7.3 kcal/mol of energy (∆G = −7.3 kcal/mol of energy). If it takes 2.1 kcal/mol of energy to move one Na + across the membrane (∆G = +2.1 kcal/mol of energy), how many sodium ions could be moved by the hydrolysis of one ATP molecule?

[link] Three sodium ions could be moved by the hydrolysis of one ATP molecule. The ∆G of the coupled reaction must be negative. Movement of three sodium ions across the membrane will take 6.3 kcal of energy (2.1 kcal × 3 Na + ions = 6.3 kcal). Hydrolysis of ATP provides 7.3 kcal of energy, more than enough to power this reaction. Movement of four sodium ions across the membrane, however, would require 8.4 kcal of energy, more than one ATP molecule can provide.

Questions & Answers

anyone know any internet site where one can find nanotechnology papers?
Damian Reply
research.net
kanaga
Introduction about quantum dots in nanotechnology
Praveena Reply
what does nano mean?
Anassong Reply
nano basically means 10^(-9). nanometer is a unit to measure length.
Bharti
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Damian Reply
absolutely yes
Daniel
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Akash Reply
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characteristics of micro business
Abigail
for teaching engĺish at school how nano technology help us
Anassong
Do somebody tell me a best nano engineering book for beginners?
s. Reply
there is no specific books for beginners but there is book called principle of nanotechnology
NANO
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Devang Reply
are you nano engineer ?
s.
fullerene is a bucky ball aka Carbon 60 molecule. It was name by the architect Fuller. He design the geodesic dome. it resembles a soccer ball.
Tarell
what is the actual application of fullerenes nowadays?
Damian
That is a great question Damian. best way to answer that question is to Google it. there are hundreds of applications for buck minister fullerenes, from medical to aerospace. you can also find plenty of research papers that will give you great detail on the potential applications of fullerenes.
Tarell
what is the Synthesis, properties,and applications of carbon nano chemistry
Abhijith Reply
Mostly, they use nano carbon for electronics and for materials to be strengthened.
Virgil
is Bucky paper clear?
CYNTHIA
carbon nanotubes has various application in fuel cells membrane, current research on cancer drug,and in electronics MEMS and NEMS etc
NANO
so some one know about replacing silicon atom with phosphorous in semiconductors device?
s. Reply
Yeah, it is a pain to say the least. You basically have to heat the substarte up to around 1000 degrees celcius then pass phosphene gas over top of it, which is explosive and toxic by the way, under very low pressure.
Harper
Do you know which machine is used to that process?
s.
how to fabricate graphene ink ?
SUYASH Reply
for screen printed electrodes ?
SUYASH
What is lattice structure?
s. Reply
of graphene you mean?
Ebrahim
or in general
Ebrahim
in general
s.
Graphene has a hexagonal structure
tahir
On having this app for quite a bit time, Haven't realised there's a chat room in it.
Cied
what is biological synthesis of nanoparticles
Sanket Reply
what's the easiest and fastest way to the synthesize AgNP?
Damian Reply
China
Cied
types of nano material
abeetha Reply
I start with an easy one. carbon nanotubes woven into a long filament like a string
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many many of nanotubes
Porter
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I'm interested in nanotube
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Source:  OpenStax, Cell biology. OpenStax CNX. Jan 04, 2014 Download for free at https://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11570/1.3
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