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Problems&Exercises

Integrated Concepts

The 54.0-eV electron in [link] has a 0.167-nm wavelength. If such electrons are passed through a double slit and have their first maximum at an angle of 25 . size 12{"25" "." 0°} {} , what is the slit separation d size 12{d} {} ?

0.395 nm

Integrated Concepts

An electron microscope produces electrons with a 2.00-pm wavelength. If these are passed through a 1.00-nm single slit, at what angle will the first diffraction minimum be found?

Integrated Concepts

A certain heat lamp emits 200 W of mostly IR radiation averaging 1500 nm in wavelength. (a) What is the average photon energy in joules? (b) How many of these photons are required to increase the temperature of a person’s shoulder by 2 . C size 12{2 "." 0°C} {} , assuming the affected mass is 4.0 kg with a specific heat of 0 .83 kcal /kg ºC size 12{0 "." "83"" kcal/kg" cdot °C} {} . Also assume no other significant heat transfer. (c) How long does this take?

(a) 1.3 × 10 19 J size 12{1 "." "33" times "10" rSup { size 8{ - "19"} } " J"} {}

(b) 2 . 1 × 10 23 size 12{2 "." 1 times "10" rSup { size 8{"23"} } } {}

(c) 1 . 4 × 10 2 s size 12{1 "." 4 times "10" rSup { size 8{2} } " s"} {}

Integrated Concepts

On its high power setting, a microwave oven produces 900 W of 2560 MHz microwaves. (a) How many photons per second is this? (b) How many photons are required to increase the temperature of a 0.500-kg mass of pasta by 45 . C size 12{"45" "." 0°C} {} , assuming a specific heat of 0 . 900 kcal/kg ºC size 12{0 "." "900"" kcal/kg" cdot °C} {} ? Neglect all other heat transfer. (c) How long must the microwave operator wait for their pasta to be ready?

Integrated Concepts

(a) Calculate the amount of microwave energy in joules needed to raise the temperature of 1.00 kg of soup from 20 . C size 12{"20" "." 0°C} {} to 100 ºC size 12{"100"°C} {} . (b) What is the total momentum of all the microwave photons it takes to do this? (c) Calculate the velocity of a 1.00-kg mass with the same momentum. (d) What is the kinetic energy of this mass?

(a) 3 . 35 × 10 5 J size 12{3 "." "35" times "10" rSup { size 8{5} } " J"} {}

(b) 1 . 12 × 10 –3 kg m/s size 12{1 "." "12" times "10" rSup { size 8{"–3"} } " kg" cdot "m/s"} {}

(c) 1 . 12 × 10 –3 m/s size 12{1 "." "12" times "10" rSup { size 8{"–3"} } " m/s"} {}

(d) 6.23 × 10 –7 J size 12{6 "." "23" times "10" rSup { size 8{"–7"} } " J"} {}

Integrated Concepts

(a) What is γ size 12{γ} {} for an electron emerging from the Stanford Linear Accelerator with a total energy of 50.0 GeV? (b) Find its momentum. (c) What is the electron’s wavelength?

Integrated Concepts

(a) What is γ size 12{γ} {} for a proton having an energy of 1.00 TeV, produced by the Fermilab accelerator? (b) Find its momentum. (c) What is the proton’s wavelength?

(a) 1 . 06 × 10 3 size 12{1 "." "07" times "10" rSup { size 8{3} } } {}

(b) 5 . 33 × 10 16 kg m/s size 12{5 "." "34" times "10" rSup { size 8{ - "16"} } `"kg" cdot "m/s"} {}

(c) 1 . 24 × 10 18 m size 12{1 "." "24" times "10" rSup { size 8{ - "18"} } `m} {}

Integrated Concepts

An electron microscope passes 1.00-pm-wavelength electrons through a circular aperture 2 . 00 μm size 12{2 "." "00 μm"} {} in diameter. What is the angle between two just-resolvable point sources for this microscope?

Integrated Concepts

(a) Calculate the velocity of electrons that form the same pattern as 450-nm light when passed through a double slit. (b) Calculate the kinetic energy of each and compare them. (c) Would either be easier to generate than the other? Explain.

(a) 1 . 62 × 10 3 m/s size 12{1 "." "62" times "10" rSup { size 8{3} } " m/s"} {}

(b) 4 . 42 × 10 19 J size 12{4 "." "41" times "10" rSup { size 8{ - "19"} } " J"} {} for photon, 1 . 19 × 10 24 J size 12{1 "." "19" times "10" rSup { size 8{ - "24"} } `J} {} for electron, photon energy is 3 . 71 × 10 5 size 12{3 "." "71" times "10" rSup { size 8{5} } } {} times greater

(c) The light is easier to make because 450-nm light is blue light and therefore easy to make. Creating electrons with 7.43 μeV size 12{7 "." "43"`"μeV"} {} of energy would not be difficult, but would require a vacuum.

Integrated Concepts

(a) What is the separation between double slits that produces a second-order minimum at 45 . size 12{"45" "." 0°} {} for 650-nm light? (b) What slit separation is needed to produce the same pattern for 1.00-keV protons.

(a) 2 . 30 × 10 6 m size 12{2 "." "30" times "10" rSup { size 8{ - 6} } " m"} {}

(b) 3 . 20 × 10 12 m size 12{3 "." "20" times "10" rSup { size 8{ - "12"} } `m} {}

Integrated Concepts

A laser with a power output of 2.00 mW at a wavelength of 400 nm is projected onto calcium metal. (a) How many electrons per second are ejected? (b) What power is carried away by the electrons, given that the binding energy is 2.71 eV? (c) Calculate the current of ejected electrons. (d) If the photoelectric material is electrically insulated and acts like a 2.00-pF capacitor, how long will current flow before the capacitor voltage stops it?

Integrated Concepts

One problem with x rays is that they are not sensed. Calculate the temperature increase of a researcher exposed in a few seconds to a nearly fatal accidental dose of x rays under the following conditions. The energy of the x-ray photons is 200 keV, and 4 . 00 × 10 13 size 12{4 "." "00" times "10" rSup { size 8{"13"} } } {} of them are absorbed per kilogram of tissue, the specific heat of which is 0 . 830 kcal/kg ºC size 12{0 "." "830"" kcal/kg" cdot °C} {} . (Note that medical diagnostic x-ray machines cannot produce an intensity this great.)

3 . 69 × 10 4 ºC size 12{3 "." "69" times "10" rSup { size 8{ - 4} } `°C} {}

Integrated Concepts

A 1.00-fm photon has a wavelength short enough to detect some information about nuclei. (a) What is the photon momentum? (b) What is its energy in joules and MeV? (c) What is the (relativistic) velocity of an electron with the same momentum? (d) Calculate the electron’s kinetic energy.

Integrated Concepts

The momentum of light is exactly reversed when reflected straight back from a mirror, assuming negligible recoil of the mirror. Thus the change in momentum is twice the photon momentum. Suppose light of intensity 1 . 00 kW/m 2 size 12{1 "." "00 kW/m" rSup { size 8{2} } } {} reflects from a mirror of area 2 . 00 m 2 size 12{2 "." "00 m" rSup { size 8{2} } } {} . (a) Calculate the energy reflected in 1.00 s. (b) What is the momentum imparted to the mirror? (c) Using the most general form of Newton’s second law, what is the force on the mirror? (d) Does the assumption of no mirror recoil seem reasonable?

(a) 2.00 kJ

(b) 1 . 33 × 10 5 kg m/s size 12{1 "." "33" times "10" rSup { size 8{ - 5} } `"kg" cdot "m/s"} {}

(c) 1 . 33 × 10 5 N size 12{1 "." "33" times "10" rSup { size 8{ - 5} } " N"} {}

(d) yes

Integrated Concepts

Sunlight above the Earth’s atmosphere has an intensity of 1 . 30 kW/m 2 size 12{1 "." "30"" kW/m" rSup { size 8{2} } } {} . If this is reflected straight back from a mirror that has only a small recoil, the light’s momentum is exactly reversed, giving the mirror twice the incident momentum. (a) Calculate the force per square meter of mirror. (b) Very low mass mirrors can be constructed in the near weightlessness of space, and attached to a spaceship to sail it. Once done, the average mass per square meter of the spaceship is 0.100 kg. Find the acceleration of the spaceship if all other forces are balanced. (c) How fast is it moving 24 hours later?

Questions & Answers

What fields keep nano created devices from performing or assimulating ? Magnetic fields ? Are do they assimilate ?
Stoney Reply
why we need to study biomolecules, molecular biology in nanotechnology?
Adin Reply
?
Kyle
yes I'm doing my masters in nanotechnology, we are being studying all these domains as well..
Adin
why?
Adin
what school?
Kyle
biomolecules are e building blocks of every organics and inorganic materials.
Joe
anyone know any internet site where one can find nanotechnology papers?
Damian Reply
research.net
kanaga
sciencedirect big data base
Ernesto
Introduction about quantum dots in nanotechnology
Praveena Reply
what does nano mean?
Anassong Reply
nano basically means 10^(-9). nanometer is a unit to measure length.
Bharti
do you think it's worthwhile in the long term to study the effects and possibilities of nanotechnology on viral treatment?
Damian Reply
absolutely yes
Daniel
how to know photocatalytic properties of tio2 nanoparticles...what to do now
Akash Reply
it is a goid question and i want to know the answer as well
Maciej
characteristics of micro business
Abigail
for teaching engĺish at school how nano technology help us
Anassong
Do somebody tell me a best nano engineering book for beginners?
s. Reply
there is no specific books for beginners but there is book called principle of nanotechnology
NANO
what is fullerene does it is used to make bukky balls
Devang Reply
are you nano engineer ?
s.
fullerene is a bucky ball aka Carbon 60 molecule. It was name by the architect Fuller. He design the geodesic dome. it resembles a soccer ball.
Tarell
what is the actual application of fullerenes nowadays?
Damian
That is a great question Damian. best way to answer that question is to Google it. there are hundreds of applications for buck minister fullerenes, from medical to aerospace. you can also find plenty of research papers that will give you great detail on the potential applications of fullerenes.
Tarell
what is the Synthesis, properties,and applications of carbon nano chemistry
Abhijith Reply
Mostly, they use nano carbon for electronics and for materials to be strengthened.
Virgil
is Bucky paper clear?
CYNTHIA
carbon nanotubes has various application in fuel cells membrane, current research on cancer drug,and in electronics MEMS and NEMS etc
NANO
so some one know about replacing silicon atom with phosphorous in semiconductors device?
s. Reply
Yeah, it is a pain to say the least. You basically have to heat the substarte up to around 1000 degrees celcius then pass phosphene gas over top of it, which is explosive and toxic by the way, under very low pressure.
Harper
Do you know which machine is used to that process?
s.
how to fabricate graphene ink ?
SUYASH Reply
for screen printed electrodes ?
SUYASH
What is lattice structure?
s. Reply
of graphene you mean?
Ebrahim
or in general
Ebrahim
in general
s.
Graphene has a hexagonal structure
tahir
On having this app for quite a bit time, Haven't realised there's a chat room in it.
Cied
what is biological synthesis of nanoparticles
Sanket Reply
what's the easiest and fastest way to the synthesize AgNP?
Damian Reply
China
Cied
how did you get the value of 2000N.What calculations are needed to arrive at it
Smarajit Reply
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Source:  OpenStax, Basic physics for medical imaging. OpenStax CNX. Feb 17, 2014 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11630/1.1
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