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  • Find the center of mass of objects distributed along a line.
  • Locate the center of mass of a thin plate.
  • Use symmetry to help locate the centroid of a thin plate.
  • Apply the theorem of Pappus for volume.

In this section, we consider centers of mass (also called centroids , under certain conditions) and moments. The basic idea of the center of mass is the notion of a balancing point. Many of us have seen performers who spin plates on the ends of sticks. The performers try to keep several of them spinning without allowing any of them to drop. If we look at a single plate (without spinning it), there is a sweet spot on the plate where it balances perfectly on the stick. If we put the stick anywhere other than that sweet spot, the plate does not balance and it falls to the ground. (That is why performers spin the plates; the spin helps keep the plates from falling even if the stick is not exactly in the right place.) Mathematically, that sweet spot is called the center of mass of the plate .

In this section, we first examine these concepts in a one-dimensional context, then expand our development to consider centers of mass of two-dimensional regions and symmetry. Last, we use centroids to find the volume of certain solids by applying the theorem of Pappus.

Center of mass and moments

Let’s begin by looking at the center of mass in a one-dimensional context. Consider a long, thin wire or rod of negligible mass resting on a fulcrum, as shown in [link] (a). Now suppose we place objects having masses m 1 and m 2 at distances d 1 and d 2 from the fulcrum, respectively, as shown in [link] (b).

This figure has two images. The first image is a horizontal line on top of an equilateral triangle. It represents a rod on a fulcrum. The second image is the same as the first with two squares on the line. They are labeled msub1 and msub2. The distance from msub1 to the fulcrum is dsub1. The distance from msub2 to the fulcrum is dsub2.
(a) A thin rod rests on a fulcrum. (b) Masses are placed on the rod.

The most common real-life example of a system like this is a playground seesaw, or teeter-totter, with children of different weights sitting at different distances from the center. On a seesaw, if one child sits at each end, the heavier child sinks down and the lighter child is lifted into the air. If the heavier child slides in toward the center, though, the seesaw balances. Applying this concept to the masses on the rod, we note that the masses balance each other if and only if m 1 d 1 = m 2 d 2 .

In the seesaw example, we balanced the system by moving the masses (children) with respect to the fulcrum. However, we are really interested in systems in which the masses are not allowed to move, and instead we balance the system by moving the fulcrum. Suppose we have two point masses, m 1 and m 2 , located on a number line at points x 1 and x 2 , respectively ( [link] ). The center of mass, x , is the point where the fulcrum should be placed to make the system balance.

This figure is an image of the x-axis. On the axis there is a point labeled x bar. Also on the axis there is a point xsub1 with a square above it. Inside of the square is the label msub1. There is also a point xsub2 on the axis. Above this point there is a square. Inside of the square is the label msub2.
The center of mass x is the balance point of the system.

Thus, we have

m 1 | x 1 x | = m 2 | x 2 x | m 1 ( x x 1 ) = m 2 ( x 2 x ) m 1 x m 1 x 1 = m 2 x 2 m 2 x x ( m 1 + m 2 ) = m 1 x 1 + m 2 x 2 x = m 1 x 1 + m 2 x 2 m 1 + m 2 .

The expression in the numerator, m 1 x 1 + m 2 x 2 , is called the first moment of the system with respect to the origin. If the context is clear, we often drop the word first and just refer to this expression as the moment    of the system. The expression in the denominator, m 1 + m 2 , is the total mass of the system. Thus, the center of mass    of the system is the point at which the total mass of the system could be concentrated without changing the moment.

Questions & Answers

find the value of 2x=32
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corri
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4
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x-2y+3z=-3 2x-y+z=7 -x+3y-z=6
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Need help solving this problem (2/7)^-2
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x+2y-z=7
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-1
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the operation * is x * y =x + y/ 1+(x × y) show if the operation is commutative if x × y is not equal to -1
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An investment account was opened with an initial deposit of $9,600 and earns 7.4% interest, compounded continuously. How much will the account be worth after 15 years?
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lim x to infinity e^1-e^-1/log(1+x)
given eccentricity and a point find the equiation
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12, 17, 22.... 25th term
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12, 17, 22.... 25th term
Akash
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find the 15th term of the geometric sequince whose first is 18 and last term of 387
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salma
A soccer field is a rectangle 130 meters wide and 110 meters long. The coach asks players to run from one corner to the other corner diagonally across. What is that distance, to the nearest tenths place.
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Jeannette has $5 and $10 bills in her wallet. The number of fives is three more than six times the number of tens. Let t represent the number of tens. Write an expression for the number of fives.
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What is the expressiin for seven less than four times the number of nickels
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how do you translate this in Algebraic Expressions
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why surface tension is zero at critical temperature
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Need to simplify the expresin. 3/7 (x+y)-1/7 (x-1)=
Crystal Reply
. After 3 months on a diet, Lisa had lost 12% of her original weight. She lost 21 pounds. What was Lisa's original weight?
Chris Reply
Leaves accumulate on the forest floor at a rate of 2 g/cm2/yr and also decompose at a rate of 90% per year. Write a differential equation governing the number of grams of leaf litter per square centimeter of forest floor, assuming at time 0 there is no leaf litter on the ground. Does this amount approach a steady value? What is that value?
Abdul Reply
You have a cup of coffee at temperature 70°C, which you let cool 10 minutes before you pour in the same amount of milk at 1°C as in the preceding problem. How does the temperature compare to the previous cup after 10 minutes?
Abdul
Practice Key Terms 6

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Source:  OpenStax, Calculus volume 2. OpenStax CNX. Feb 05, 2016 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11965/1.2
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