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  • Determine the maximum speed of an oscillating system.

To study the energy of a simple harmonic oscillator, we first consider all the forms of energy it can have We know from Hooke’s Law: Stress and Strain Revisited that the energy stored in the deformation of a simple harmonic oscillator is a form of potential energy given by:

PE el = 1 2 kx 2 . size 12{"PE" size 8{"el"}= { {1} over {2} } ital "kx" rSup { size 8{2} } } {}

Because a simple harmonic oscillator has no dissipative forces, the other important form of energy is kinetic energy KE size 12{ ital "KE"} {} . Conservation of energy for these two forms is:

KE + PE el = constant size 12{ ital "KE"+ ital "PE" rSub { size 8{e1} } ="constant"} {}

or

1 2 mv 2 + 1 2 kx 2 = constant. size 12{ { {1} over {2} } ital "mv" rSup { size 8{2} } + { {1} over {2} } ital "kx" rSup { size 8{2} } ="constant"} {}

This statement of conservation of energy is valid for all simple harmonic oscillators, including ones where the gravitational force plays a role

Namely, for a simple pendulum we replace the velocity with v = size 12{v=Lω} {} , the spring constant with k = mg / L size 12{k= ital "mg"/L} {} , and the displacement term with x = size 12{x=Lθ} {} . Thus

1 2 mL 2 ω 2 + 1 2 mgL θ 2 = constant. size 12{ { {1} over {2} } ital "mL" rSup { size 8{2} } ω rSup { size 8{2} } + { {1} over {2} } ital "mgL"θ rSup { size 8{2} } ="constant"} {}

In the case of undamped simple harmonic motion, the energy oscillates back and forth between kinetic and potential, going completely from one to the other as the system oscillates. So for the simple example of an object on a frictionless surface attached to a spring, as shown again in [link] , the motion starts with all of the energy stored in the spring. As the object starts to move, the elastic potential energy is converted to kinetic energy, becoming entirely kinetic energy at the equilibrium position. It is then converted back into elastic potential energy by the spring, the velocity becomes zero when the kinetic energy is completely converted, and so on. This concept provides extra insight here and in later applications of simple harmonic motion, such as alternating current circuits.

Figure a shows a spring on a frictionless surface attached to a bar or wall from the left side, and on the right side of it there’s an object attached to it with mass m, its amplitude is given by X, and x equal to zero at the equilibrium level. Force F is applied to it from the right side, shown with left direction pointed red arrow and velocity v is equal to zero. A direction point showing the north and west direction is also given alongside this figure as well as with other four figures. The energy given here for the object is given according to the velocity. In figure b, after the force has been applied, the object moves to the left compressing the spring a bit, and the displaced area of the object from its initial point is shown in sketched dots. F is equal to zero and the V is max in negative direction. The energy given here for the object is given according to the velocity. In figure c, the spring has been compressed to the maximum level, and the amplitude is negative x. Now the direction of force changes to the rightward direction, shown with right direction pointed red arrow and the velocity v zero. The energy given here for the object is given according to the velocity.                In figure d, the spring is shown released from the compressed level and the object has moved toward the right side up to the equilibrium level. F is zero, and the velocity v is maximum. The energy given here for the object is given according to the velocity.               In figure e, the spring has been stretched loose to the maximum level and the object has moved to the far right. Now again the velocity here is equal to zero and the direction of force again is to the left hand side, shown here as F is equal to zero. The energy given here for the object is given according to the velocity.
The transformation of energy in simple harmonic motion is illustrated for an object attached to a spring on a frictionless surface.

The conservation of energy principle can be used to derive an expression for velocity v size 12{v} {} . If we start our simple harmonic motion with zero velocity and maximum displacement ( x = X size 12{x=X} {} ), then the total energy is

1 2 kX 2 . size 12{ { {1} over {2} } ital "kX" rSup { size 8{2} } } {}

This total energy is constant and is shifted back and forth between kinetic energy and potential energy, at most times being shared by each. The conservation of energy for this system in equation form is thus:

1 2 mv 2 + 1 2 kx 2 = 1 2 kX 2 . size 12{ { {1} over {2} } ital "mv" rSup { size 8{2} } + { {1} over {2} } ital "kx" rSup { size 8{2} } = { {1} over {2} } ital "kX" rSup { size 8{2} } } {}

Solving this equation for v size 12{v} {} yields:

v = ± k m X 2 x 2 . size 12{v= +- sqrt { { {k} over {m} } left (X rSup { size 8{2} } - x rSup { size 8{2} } right )} } {}

Manipulating this expression algebraically gives:

v = ± k m X 1 x 2 X 2 size 12{v= +- sqrt { { {k} over {m} } } X sqrt {1 - { {x rSup { size 8{2} } } over {X rSup { size 8{2} } } } } } {}

and so

v = ± v max 1 x 2 X 2 , size 12{v= +- v size 8{"max" sqrt {1 - { {x rSup { size 8{2} } } over {X rSup { size 8{2} } } } } }} {}

where

v max = k m X . size 12{v size 8{"max"}= sqrt { { {k} over {m} } } X} {}

From this expression, we see that the velocity is a maximum ( v max ) at x = 0 size 12{x=0} {} , as stated earlier in v t = v max sin t T . Notice that the maximum velocity depends on three factors. Maximum velocity is directly proportional to amplitude. As you might guess, the greater the maximum displacement the greater the maximum velocity. Maximum velocity is also greater for stiffer systems, because they exert greater force for the same displacement. This observation is seen in the expression for v max ; it is proportional to the square root of the force constant k . Finally, the maximum velocity is smaller for objects that have larger masses, because the maximum velocity is inversely proportional to the square root of m . For a given force, objects that have large masses accelerate more slowly.

Questions & Answers

kinetic functional force
Moyagabo Reply
what is a principal wave?
Haider Reply
A wave the movement of particles on rest position transferring energy from one place to another
Gabche
not wave. i need to know principal wave or waves.
Haider
principle wave is a superposition of wave when two or more waves meet at a point , whose amplitude is the algebraic sum of the amplitude of the waves
arshad
kindly define principal wave not principle wave (principle of super position) if u can understand my question
Haider
what is a model?
Ella Reply
hi
Muhanned
why are electros emitted only when the frequency of the incident radiation is greater than a certain value
ANSELEM Reply
b/c u have to know that for emission of electron need specific amount of energy which are gain by electron for emission . if incident rays have that amount of energy electron can be emitted, otherwise no way.
Nazir
search photoelectric effect on Google
Nazir
what is ohm's law
Pamilerin Reply
states that electric current in a given metallic conductor is directly proportional to the potential difference applied between its end, provided that the temperature of the conductor and other physical factors such as length and cross-sectional area remains constant. mathematically V=IR
ANIEFIOK
hi
Gundala
A body travelling at a velocity of 30ms^-1 in a straight line is brought to rest by application of brakes. if it covers a distance of 100m during this period, find the retardation.
Pamilerin Reply
just use v^2-u^2=2as
Gundala
how often does electrolyte emits?
alhassan
just use +€^3.7°√π%-4¢•∆¥%
v^2-u^2=2as v=0,u=30,s=100 -30^2=2a*100 -900=200a a=-900/200 a=-4.5m/s^2
akinyemi
what is distribution of trade
Grace Reply
what's acceleration
Joshua Reply
The change in position of an object with respect to time
Mfizi
Acceleration is velocity all over time
Pamilerin
hi
Stephen
It's not It's the change of velocity relative to time
Laura
Velocity is the change of position relative to time
Laura
acceleration it is the rate of change in velocity with time
Stephen
acceleration is change in velocity per rate of time
Noara
what is ohm's law
Stephen
Ohm's law is related to resistance by which volatge is the multiplication of current and resistance ( U=RI)
Laura
acceleration is the rate of change. of displacement with time.
Radical
the rate of change of velocity is called acceleration
Asma
how i don understand
Willam Reply
how do I access the Multiple Choice Questions? the button never works and the essay one doesn't either
Savannah Reply
How do you determine the magnitude of force
Peace Reply
mass × acceleration OR Work done ÷ distance
Seema
Which eye defect is corrected by a lens having different curvatures in two perpendicular directions?
Valentina Reply
acute astigmatism?
the difference between virtual work and virtual displacement
Noman Reply
How do you calculate uncertainties
Ancilla Reply
What is Elasticity
Salim Reply
the property of a body to regain it's original shape is called elasticity. or. the property of a body which can be stretch is called elasticity.
Nazir

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Source:  OpenStax, College physics. OpenStax CNX. Jul 27, 2015 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11406/1.9
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