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The figure shows 3 t-accounts. T-account (a) has the following assets: reserves = 40; bonds = 120; loans = 300. T-account (a) has the following Liabilities: deposits = 400; net worth = 60. T-account (b) has the following assets: reserves = (40 + 20 = 60); bonds = (120 – 20 = 100); loans = 300. T-account (b) has the following liabilities: deposits = 400; net worth = 60. T-account (c) has the following assets: reserves = (60 – 20 = 40); bonds = 100; loans = (300 + 20 = 320). T-account (c) has the following liabilities: deposits = 400; net worth = 60.

Where did the Federal Reserve get the $20 million that it used to purchase the bonds ? A central bank has the power to create money. In practical terms, the Federal Reserve would write a check to Happy Bank, so that Happy Bank can have that money credited to its bank account at the Federal Reserve. In truth, the Federal Reserve created the money to purchase the bonds out of thin air—or with a few clicks on some computer keys.

Open market operations can also reduce the quantity of money and loans in an economy. [link] (a) shows the balance sheet of Happy Bank before the central bank sells bonds in the open market. When Happy Bank purchases $30 million in bonds, Happy Bank sends $30 million of its reserves to the central bank, but now holds an additional $30 million in bonds, as shown in [link] (b). However, Happy Bank wants to hold $40 million in reserves, as in [link] (a), so it will adjust down the quantity of its loans by $30 million, to bring its reserves back to the desired level, as shown in [link] (c). In practical terms, a bank can easily reduce its quantity of loans. At any given time, a bank is receiving payments on loans that it made previously and also making new loans. If the bank just slows down or briefly halts making new loans, and instead adds those funds to its reserves, then its overall quantity of loans will decrease. A decrease in the quantity of loans also means fewer deposits in other banks, and other banks reducing their lending as well, as the money multiplier discussed in Money and Banking takes effect. And what about all those bonds? How do they affect the money supply? Read the following Clear It Up feature for the answer.

The figure shows 3 t-accounts. T-account (a) has the following assets: reserves = 40; bonds = 120; loans = 300. T-account (a) has the following Liabilities: deposits = 400; net worth = 60. T-account (b) has the following assets: reserves = (40 – 30 = 10); bonds = (120 + 30 = 150); loans = 300. T-account (b) has the following liabilities: deposits = 400; net worth = 60. T-account (c) has the following assets: reserves = (10 + 30 = 40); bonds = 150; loans = (300 – 30 = 270). T-account (c) has the following liabilities: deposits = 400; net worth = 60.

Does selling or buying bonds increase the money supply?

Is it a sale of bonds by the central bank which increases bank reserves and lowers interest rates or is it a purchase of bonds by the central bank? The easy way to keep track of this is to treat the central bank as being outside the banking system. When a central bank buys bonds, money is flowing from the central bank to individual banks in the economy, increasing the supply of money in circulation. When a central bank sells bonds, then money from individual banks in the economy is flowing into the central bank—reducing the quantity of money in the economy.

Changing reserve requirements

A second method of conducting monetary policy is for the central bank to raise or lower the reserve requirement    , which, as we noted earlier, is the percentage of each bank’s deposits that it is legally required to hold either as cash in their vault or on deposit with the central bank. If banks are required to hold a greater amount in reserves    , they have less money available to lend out. If banks are allowed to hold a smaller amount in reserves, they will have a greater amount of money available to lend out.

In early 2015, the Federal Reserve required banks to hold reserves equal to 0% of the first $14.5 million in deposits, then to hold reserves equal to 3% of the deposits up to $103.6 million, and 10% of any amount above $103.6 million. Small changes in the reserve requirements are made almost every year. For example, the $103.6 million dividing line is sometimes bumped up or down by a few million dollars. In practice, large changes in reserve requirements are rarely used to execute monetary policy. A sudden demand that all banks increase their reserves would be extremely disruptive and difficult to comply with, while loosening requirements too much would create a danger of banks being unable to meet the demand for withdrawals.

Questions & Answers

for an economy the following function have been given. C=100+0.8y, S=100+0.2, i=120-5r, Ms=120, Md=0.2y-5r find out IS equation. LM equation. Equilibrium level of income and interest rate.
Sanjana Reply
aggregate expenditure model til monetery policy
Sadia Reply
Using the Solow growth model discuss the implications of the covid19 pandemic on the prospects of long run economic growth for South Africa
Simthembile Reply
ln last word discuss (if. ,at all)changes in the stock prices relate to macroeconomic stability
rachel Reply
what do you know about the nigration in labor economic ?
Goleen
how do I find savings in a national income question calculation
Ayo Reply
Savings = Income - consumption... Remember Y=C+I+G-(X-M)
Mike
what is the most issue of macroeconomic?
Tarik Reply
Unemployment since it covers the youth and all the pension leavers.
aboagye
I would say economic growth. Economic growth stems from proper use of factors of Productions, good political reforms, investments (Foreign & local), employment, low levels of inflation & stable currency.
Mike
Calculate the cross elasticity of demand by using the following data: Price of petrol rises from Rs. 20 per litre to Rs. 25 per litre so as the demand for cars falls from 50 per month to 30 per month.
karnika Reply
what does it indicate when there is an increase in supply
Sisanda Reply
cost of production might have decreased whereas price must have been increased also interest rate might have been lowered
kazim
it indicates that the demand for goods in the market is lesser than the supply caused by an increase in prices thereby leading to inflation
Angel
what is the the strength of using GDP
KEJI Reply
what is macro economics
Sana Reply
the branch of economics that focuses on board issue such as growth unemployment inflation and trade balance.
Ghazi
money in a modern economic
Vishal Reply
Use the table below answer questions the following question Variables R millions Current consumption expenditure by the general government 15 000 Indirect Taxes on products 5 000 Private consumption expenditure by households 10 000 Exports of goods and services to the rest of the world 5 0
Aphiwe Reply
an economy starts off with a GDP per capita of $5000. How large will the GDP per capita be if it grow at an annual rate of 2% for 20years
King Reply
5000*(1+0.02)*20=7,450 USD
Modek
Nice
Mike
how have total output abd output
_Mohd Reply
what are the different types of unemployment
Nina Reply

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Source:  OpenStax, Macroeconomics. OpenStax CNX. Jun 16, 2014 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11626/1.10
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