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Q = P 2 P 1 R size 12{Q= { {P rSub { size 8{2} } - P rSub { size 8{1} } } over {R} } } {}

to

P 2 P 1 = R Q , size 12{P rSub { size 8{2} } - P rSub { size 8{1} } =R`Q} {}

where, in this case, P 2 size 12{P rSub { size 8{2} } } {} is the pressure at the water works and R size 12{R} {} is the resistance of the water main. During times of heavy use, the flow rate Q size 12{Q} {} is large. This means that P 2 P 1 size 12{P rSub { size 8{2} } - P rSub { size 8{1} } } {} must also be large. Thus P 1 size 12{P rSub { size 8{1} } } {} must decrease. It is correct to think of flow and resistance as causing the pressure to drop from P 2 size 12{P rSub { size 8{2} } } {} to P 1 size 12{P rSub { size 8{1} } } {} . P 2 P 1 = R Q size 12{P rSub { size 8{2} } - P rSub { size 8{1} } =R`Q} {} is valid for both laminar and turbulent flows.

Figure shows the water distribution system from a water works to homes around that area. The pressure at the pipeline near the water works is shown to have a pressure P two and the pressure at the dividing point were the pipe line splits to corresponding houses the pressure is shown as P one.
During times of heavy use, there is a significant pressure drop in a water main, and P 1 supplied to users is significantly less than P 2 created at the water works. If the flow is very small, then the pressure drop is negligible, and P 2 P 1 size 12{P rSub { size 8{2} } approx P rSub { size 8{1} } } {} .

We can use P 2 P 1 = R Q size 12{P rSub { size 8{2} } - P rSub { size 8{1} } =R`Q} {} to analyze pressure drops occurring in more complex systems in which the tube radius is not the same everywhere. Resistance will be much greater in narrow places, such as an obstructed coronary artery. For a given flow rate Q size 12{Q} {} , the pressure drop will be greatest where the tube is most narrow. This is how water faucets control flow. Additionally, R size 12{Q} {} is greatly increased by turbulence, and a constriction that creates turbulence greatly reduces the pressure downstream. Plaque in an artery reduces pressure and hence flow, both by its resistance and by the turbulence it creates.

[link] is a schematic of the human circulatory system, showing average blood pressures in its major parts for an adult at rest. Pressure created by the heart’s two pumps, the right and left ventricles, is reduced by the resistance of the blood vessels as the blood flows through them. The left ventricle increases arterial blood pressure that drives the flow of blood through all parts of the body except the lungs. The right ventricle receives the lower pressure blood from two major veins and pumps it through the lungs for gas exchange with atmospheric gases – the disposal of carbon dioxide from the blood and the replenishment of oxygen. Only one major organ is shown schematically, with typical branching of arteries to ever smaller vessels, the smallest of which are the capillaries, and rejoining of small veins into larger ones. Similar branching takes place in a variety of organs in the body, and the circulatory system has considerable flexibility in flow regulation to these organs by the dilation and constriction of the arteries leading to them and the capillaries within them. The sensitivity of flow to tube radius makes this flexibility possible over a large range of flow rates.

Figure is a schematic diagram of the circulatory system. The lungs, heart, arteries and vein systems are shown. The blood is shown to flow from the left atrium through the arteries, then through the veins and back to the right atrium. The flow is also shown from right atrium to the lungs and from lungs back to left atrium. All parts of the system are labeled. Pressure various points of the system all along the movement of blood across various parts are also marked.
Schematic of the circulatory system. Pressure difference is created by the two pumps in the heart and is reduced by resistance in the vessels. Branching of vessels into capillaries allows blood to reach individual cells and exchange substances, such as oxygen and waste products, with them. The system has an impressive ability to regulate flow to individual organs, accomplished largely by varying vessel diameters.

Each branching of larger vessels into smaller vessels increases the total cross-sectional area of the tubes through which the blood flows. For example, an artery with a cross section of 1 cm 2 size 12{1`"cm" rSup { size 8{2} } } {} may branch into 20 smaller arteries, each with cross sections of 0.5 cm 2 size 12{0 "." 5`"cm" rSup { size 8{2} } } {} , with a total of 10 cm 2 size 12{"10"`"cm" rSup { size 8{2} } } {} . In that manner, the resistance of the branchings is reduced so that pressure is not entirely lost. Moreover, because Q = A v ¯ size 12{Q=A { bar {v}}} {} and A increases through branching, the average velocity of the blood in the smaller vessels is reduced. The blood velocity in the aorta ( diameter = 1 cm size 12{"diameter"=1`"cm"} {} ) is about 25 cm/s, while in the capillaries ( 20 μ m in diameter) the velocity is about 1 mm/s. This reduced velocity allows the blood to exchange substances with the cells in the capillaries and alveoli in particular.

Questions & Answers

full meaning of GPS system
Anaele Reply
how to prove that Newton's law of universal gravitation F = GmM ______ R²
Kaka Reply
sir dose it apply to the human system
Olubukola Reply
prove that the centrimental force Fc= M1V² _________ r
Kaka Reply
prove that centripetal force Fc = MV² ______ r
Kaka
how lesers can transmit information
mitul Reply
griffts bridge derivative
Ganesh Reply
below me
please explain; when a glass rod is rubbed with silk, it becomes positive and the silk becomes negative- yet both attracts dust. does dust have third types of charge that is attracted to both positive and negative
Timothy Reply
what is a conductor
Timothy
hello
Timothy
below me
why below you
Timothy
no....I said below me ...... nothing below .....ok?
dust particles contains both positive and negative charge particles
Mbutene
corona charge can verify
Stephen
when pressure increases the temperature remain what?
Ibrahim Reply
what is frequency
Mbionyi Reply
define precision briefly
Sujitha Reply
CT scanners do not detect details smaller than about 0.5 mm. Is this limitation due to the wavelength of x rays? Explain.
MITHRA Reply
hope this helps
what's critical angle
Mahmud Reply
The Critical Angle Derivation So the critical angle is defined as the angle of incidence that provides an angle of refraction of 90-degrees. Make particular note that the critical angle is an angle of incidence value. For the water-air boundary, the critical angle is 48.6-degrees.
dude.....next time Google it
okay whatever
Chidalu
pls who can give the definition of relative density?
Temiloluwa
the ratio of the density of a substance to the density of a standard, usually water for a liquid or solid, and air for a gas.
Chidalu
What is momentum
aliyu Reply
mass ×velocity
Chidalu
it is the product of mass ×velocity of an object
Chidalu
how do I highlight a sentence]p? I select the sentence but get options like copy or web search but no highlight. tks. src
Sean Reply
then you can edit your work anyway you want
Wat is the relationship between Instataneous velocity
Oyinlusi Reply
Instantaneous velocity is defined as the rate of change of position for a time interval which is almost equal to zero
Astronomy
Practice Key Terms 5

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Source:  OpenStax, College physics. OpenStax CNX. Jul 27, 2015 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11406/1.9
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