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For the same tetrahybrid cross, what is the expected proportion of offspring that have the dominant phenotype at all four loci? We can answer this question using phenotypic proportions, but let’s do it the hard way—using genotypic proportions. The question asks for the proportion of offspring that are 1) homozygous dominant at A or heterozygous at A, and 2) homozygous at B or heterozygous at B , and so on. Noting the “or” and “and” in each circumstance makes clear where to apply the sum and product rules. The probability of a homozygous dominant at A is 1/4 and the probability of a heterozygote at A is 1/2. The probability of the homozygote or the heterozygote is 1/4 + 1/2 = 3/4 using the sum rule. The same probability can be obtained in the same way for each of the other genes, so that the probability of a dominant phenotype at A and B and C and D is, using the product rule, equal to 3/4 × 3/4 × 3/4 × 3/4, or 27/64. If you are ever unsure about how to combine probabilities, returning to the forked-line method should make it clear.

Rules for multihybrid fertilization

Predicting the genotypes and phenotypes of offspring from given crosses is the best way to test your knowledge of Mendelian genetics. Given a multihybrid cross that obeys independent assortment and follows a dominant and recessive pattern, several generalized rules exist; you can use these rules to check your results as you work through genetics calculations ( [link] ). To apply these rules, first you must determine n , the number of heterozygous gene pairs (the number of genes segregating two alleles each). For example, a cross between AaBb and AaBb heterozygotes has an n of 2. In contrast, a cross between AABb and AABb has an n of 1 because A is not heterozygous.

General Rules for Multihybrid Crosses
General Rule Number of Heterozygous Gene Pairs
Number of different F 1 gametes 2 n
Number of different F 2 genotypes 3 n
Given dominant and recessive inheritance, the number of different F 2 phenotypes 2 n

Linked genes violate the law of independent assortment

Although all of Mendel’s pea characteristics behaved according to the law of independent assortment, we now know that some allele combinations are not inherited independently of each other. Genes that are located on separate non-homologous chromosomes will always sort independently. However, each chromosome contains hundreds or thousands of genes, organized linearly on chromosomes like beads on a string. The segregation of alleles into gametes can be influenced by linkage    , in which genes that are located physically close to each other on the same chromosome are more likely to be inherited as a pair. However, because of the process of recombination, or “crossover,” it is possible for two genes on the same chromosome to behave independently, or as if they are not linked. To understand this, let’s consider the biological basis of gene linkage and recombination.

Homologous chromosomes possess the same genes in the same linear order. The alleles may differ on homologous chromosome pairs, but the genes to which they correspond do not. In preparation for the first division of meiosis, homologous chromosomes replicate and synapse. Like genes on the homologs align with each other. At this stage, segments of homologous chromosomes exchange linear segments of genetic material ( [link] ). This process is called recombination, or crossover, and it is a common genetic process. Because the genes are aligned during recombination, the gene order is not altered. Instead, the result of recombination is that maternal and paternal alleles are combined onto the same chromosome. Across a given chromosome, several recombination events may occur, causing extensive shuffling of alleles.

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Source:  OpenStax, Biology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 29, 2016 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11448/1.10
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