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Learners frequently exchange hands because they are unable to cross over the middleline of the body. Problems around such middleline crossing results in continuous repositioning of the body, which has a negative effect on concentration and work speed and leads to tiredness.

  1. SPECIFIC APPLICATION IN LEARNING AREAS
  2. LITERACY

Examples of activities:

  • Dramatisation of stories / everyday activities
  • Telling of simple stories with the help of pictures
  • Children to arrange pictures from a story in the correct sequence and tell the story accordingly
  • Fine coordination activities (see paragraph 3.1.2)
  • MATHEMATICS

Examples of activities:

  • Counting activities
  • Recognition, description and representation of figures 1 to 9
  • Comparing and arranging numbers
  • Using terms such as more, less, heavier, lighter, shorter, longer
  • Problem solving, e.g. more / less / equal to
  • Making numbers 1 more, e.g. 6 ⇐ 7
  • Counting on, e.g. the first child counts to 3; a second child counts on to 6; etc.
  • Sorting objects according to different qualities (e.g. all the red ones).
  • LIFE SKILLS

Learners show that they are able to apply what they have learnt in different situations in the community. Help them with the challenges that life offers so that they can play an active and productive role in the community. Discussing situations can help to develop problem solving skills, logical thinking and reasoning, as well as creative and critical thinking.

Examples of activities:

  • Create situations under which their potential and skills can be developed fully, so that they will be able to make a contribution to the community, e.g. “emergency situations”, class discussions and dramatisations.
  • Opportunities for entrepreneurship, e.g. making cards to sell
  • REPORT FOR FIRST QUARTER

An example of an (optional) elementary report on the learner’s progress during the first quarter is included for educators who regard it as desirable to report to parents.

MODULE FRAMEWORK
LEARNING OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT STANDARDS
NUMERACY(LO 1)NUMBERS, OPERATIONS AND RELATIONSHIPSThe learner will be able to recognise, describe and represent numbers and their relationships, and to count, estimate, calculate and check with competence and confidence in solving problems.(LO 2)PATTERNS, FUNCTIONS AND ALGEBRAThe learner will be able to recognise, describe and represent patterns and relationships, as well as to solve problems using algebraic language and skills.(LO 5)DATA HANDLINGThe learner will be able to collect, summarise, display and critically analyse data in order to draw conclusions and make predictions, and to interpret and determine chance variation.LITERACY(LO 1)LISTENINGThe learner will be able to listen for information and enjoyment, and respond appropriately and critically in a wide range of situations(LO 2)SPEAKINGThe learner will be able to communicate confidently and effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.(LO 3)READING AND VIEWINGThe learner will be able to read and view for information and enjoyment, and respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.(LO4)WRITINGThe learner will be able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.(LO 5)THINKING AND REASONINGThe learner will be able to use language to think and reason, as well as to access, process and use information for learning. We know this when the learner:1.2 counts to at least 10 everyday objects reliably;1.3 says and uses number names in familiar contexts;1.4 knows the number names and symbols for 1 to 10.We know this when the learner:2.1 copies and extends simple patterns using physical objects and drawings (e.g. using colours and shapes);We know this when the learner:5.2 sorts physical objects according to one attribute (property), e.g. red shapes.We know this when the learner:1.1 listens attentively to questions, instructions and announcements, and responds appropriately;1.4 develops phonic awareness:
  • recognises that words are made up of sounds;
  • distinguishes between different sounds, especially at the beginning and ends of words;
  • segments oral sentences into individual words (using words of one syllable at first);
  • segments spoken multi-syllabic words into syllables (e.g. ba-na-na), using clapping or drumbeats;
  • recognises some rhyming words in common rhymes and songs such as ‘We are going to the zoo zoo zoo, you can come too too too’;
We know this when the learner:2.5 asks questions when he/she does notunderstand or needs more information andresponds clearly to questions asked of him/her;2.8 tells own stories and retells stories of others in own words.We know this when the learner:3.1 uses visual cues to make meaning:
  • looks carefully at pictures and photographs to recognise common objects and experiences;
  • identifies a picture or figure from the background;
  • makes sense of picture stories;
  • matches pictures and words;
  • uses illustrations to understand simple captions in story books;
3.5 begins to develop phonic awareness:
  • recognises initial consonant and short vowel sounds;
  • recognises and names some common letters of the alphabet such as the letter the learner’s name begin with;
  • recognises some rhyming words in common rhymes and songs such as ‘We are going to the zoo zoo zoo, you can come too too too’.
We know this when the learner:4.1 experiments with writing:
  • creates and uses drawings to convey a message, and as a starting point for writing;
  • forms letters in various ways (e.g. by using own body to show the shapes, writing in sand);
  • understands that writing and drawing are different;
  • ‘writes’ and asks others to give the meaning of what has been written;
  • talks about own drawing and ‘writing’;
  • role-plays ‘writing’ for a purpose (e.g. telephone message, shopping list);
  • uses known letters and numerals (or approximations) to represent written language, especially letters from own name and age;
  • ‘reads’ own emerging writing when asked to do so;
  • shows in own writing attempts beginning awareness of directionality (e.g. starting from left to right, top to bottom);
  • copies print from the environment (e.g. labels on household items, advertisement);
  • makes attempts at familiar forms of writing, using known letters (e.g. in lists, messages or letters);
  • manipulates writing tools like crayons and pencils.
We know this when the learner:5.2 uses language to think and reason:
  • identifies and describes similarities and differences;
  • matches things that go together and
compares things that are different;
  • classifies things (e.g. puts all toys in box, books on shelves, crayons in tins);
  • identifies parts from the whole (e.g. parts of the body).
5.3 uses language to investigate and explore:
  • asks questions and searches for explanations;
  • gives explanations and offers solutions;
  • offers explanations and solutions;
  • solves and completes puzzles
LIFE ORIENTATION(LO 1)HEALTH PROMOTIONThe learner will be able to make informed decisions regarding personal, community and environmental health.(LO 3)PERSONAL DEVELOPMENTThe learner will be able to use acquired life skills to achieve and extend personal potential to respond effectively to challenges in his or her world. We know this when the learner:1.2 describes steps that can be taken to ensure personal hygiene;1.4 demonstrates precautions against the spread of communicable diseases.We know this when the learner:3.1 says own name and address.

Auditory memory

  • Who am I

Draw yourself

Fingerprint (thumb)

The children have to learn the following orally:

  • Name and surname
  • Address and telephone number
  • Age and birth date
Life skills LO : 3.1

THE KITCHEN

The importance of the safety and health of the family.

Closed questions: (These have only one correct answer)

  1. How many people are sitting around the table?
  2. Who is the oldest and who is the youngest?
  3. In which room of the house are they?
  4. What is the season of the year and how do you know this?
  5. How do you know the kettle is boiling?
  6. Look carefully at the picture and circle and name all the dangers.

Open-ended questions : (more than a single answer may be correct)

  1. What is a family?
  2. How can the dangers in the kitchen be avoided?
  3. In which way does your kitchen at home differ from the kitchen in the picture?
  4. The people in the picture are eating porridge and bread for breakfast. – what do you have for breakfast?
  5. Do you have tasks to do at home, for example, setting the table?
  6. Why is it important to wash your hands before a meal?
  7. Why is it important that food must be clean?
  8. How could you make your kitchen safer?

Bridging: (Application of what has been learnt in other situations, for instance at home or in the community).

  1. Which other places at home or in the community could be made safer (e.g. shops)?
  2. How do you think this could be done?

Discussion:

Discuss all the emergency regulations to be followed if a child:

  • drinks domestic cleaning fluids
  • sustains burn wounds

Activity:

Make a poster of healthy and unhealthy foods – provide reasons.

Life skills LO : 1.4

Logical thinking and reasoning

Creative thinking

Life skills LO : 1.4

Questions & Answers

where we get a research paper on Nano chemistry....?
Maira Reply
nanopartical of organic/inorganic / physical chemistry , pdf / thesis / review
Ali
what are the products of Nano chemistry?
Maira Reply
There are lots of products of nano chemistry... Like nano coatings.....carbon fiber.. And lots of others..
learn
Even nanotechnology is pretty much all about chemistry... Its the chemistry on quantum or atomic level
learn
Google
da
no nanotechnology is also a part of physics and maths it requires angle formulas and some pressure regarding concepts
Bhagvanji
hey
Giriraj
Preparation and Applications of Nanomaterial for Drug Delivery
Hafiz Reply
revolt
da
Application of nanotechnology in medicine
what is variations in raman spectra for nanomaterials
Jyoti Reply
I only see partial conversation and what's the question here!
Crow Reply
what about nanotechnology for water purification
RAW Reply
please someone correct me if I'm wrong but I think one can use nanoparticles, specially silver nanoparticles for water treatment.
Damian
yes that's correct
Professor
I think
Professor
Nasa has use it in the 60's, copper as water purification in the moon travel.
Alexandre
nanocopper obvius
Alexandre
what is the stm
Brian Reply
is there industrial application of fullrenes. What is the method to prepare fullrene on large scale.?
Rafiq
industrial application...? mmm I think on the medical side as drug carrier, but you should go deeper on your research, I may be wrong
Damian
How we are making nano material?
LITNING Reply
what is a peer
LITNING Reply
What is meant by 'nano scale'?
LITNING Reply
What is STMs full form?
LITNING
scanning tunneling microscope
Sahil
how nano science is used for hydrophobicity
Santosh
Do u think that Graphene and Fullrene fiber can be used to make Air Plane body structure the lightest and strongest. Rafiq
Rafiq
what is differents between GO and RGO?
Mahi
what is simplest way to understand the applications of nano robots used to detect the cancer affected cell of human body.? How this robot is carried to required site of body cell.? what will be the carrier material and how can be detected that correct delivery of drug is done Rafiq
Rafiq
if virus is killing to make ARTIFICIAL DNA OF GRAPHENE FOR KILLED THE VIRUS .THIS IS OUR ASSUMPTION
Anam
analytical skills graphene is prepared to kill any type viruses .
Anam
Any one who tell me about Preparation and application of Nanomaterial for drug Delivery
Hafiz
what is Nano technology ?
Bob Reply
write examples of Nano molecule?
Bob
The nanotechnology is as new science, to scale nanometric
brayan
nanotechnology is the study, desing, synthesis, manipulation and application of materials and functional systems through control of matter at nanoscale
Damian
Is there any normative that regulates the use of silver nanoparticles?
Damian Reply
what king of growth are you checking .?
Renato
What fields keep nano created devices from performing or assimulating ? Magnetic fields ? Are do they assimilate ?
Stoney Reply
why we need to study biomolecules, molecular biology in nanotechnology?
Adin Reply
?
Kyle
yes I'm doing my masters in nanotechnology, we are being studying all these domains as well..
Adin
why?
Adin
what school?
Kyle
biomolecules are e building blocks of every organics and inorganic materials.
Joe
how did you get the value of 2000N.What calculations are needed to arrive at it
Smarajit Reply
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Source:  OpenStax, Grade r - a learning programme. OpenStax CNX. Nov 03, 2009 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11135/1.1
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