<< Chapter < Page Chapter >> Page >
By the end of this section, you will be able to:
  • Discuss why every cell does not express all of its genes
  • Describe how prokaryotic gene expression occurs at the transcriptional level
  • Understand that eukaryotic gene expression occurs at the epigenetic, transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels

For a cell to function properly, necessary proteins must be synthesized at the proper time. All organisms and cells control or regulate the transcription and translation of their DNA into protein. The process of turning on a gene to produce RNA and protein is called gene expression    . Whether in a simple unicellular organism or in a complex multicellular organism, each cell controls when and how its genes are expressed. For this to occur, there must be a mechanism to control when a gene is expressed to make RNA and protein, how much of the protein is made, and when it is time to stop making that protein because it is no longer needed.

Cells in multicellular organisms are specialized; cells in different tissues look very different and perform different functions. For example, a muscle cell is very different from a liver cell, which is very different from a skin cell. These differences are a consequence of the expression of different sets of genes in each of these cells. All cells have certain basic functions they must perform for themselves, such as converting the energy in sugar molecules into energy in ATP. Each cell also has many genes that are not expressed, and expresses many that are not expressed by other cells, such that it can carry out its specialized functions. In addition, cells will turn on or off certain genes at different times in response to changes in the environment or at different times during the development of the organism. Unicellular organisms, both eukaryotic and prokaryotic, also turn on and off genes in response to the demands of their environment so that they can respond to special conditions.

The control of gene expression is extremely complex. Malfunctions in this process are detrimental to the cell and can lead to the development of many diseases, including cancer.

Prokaryotic versus eukaryotic gene expression

To understand how gene expression is regulated, we must first understand how a gene becomes a functional protein in a cell. The process occurs in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, just in slightly different fashions.

Because prokaryotic organisms lack a cell nucleus, the processes of transcription and translation occur almost simultaneously. When the protein is no longer needed, transcription stops. As a result, the primary method to control what type and how much protein is expressed in a prokaryotic cell is through the regulation of DNA transcription into RNA. All the subsequent steps happen automatically. When more protein is required, more transcription occurs. Therefore, in prokaryotic cells, the control of gene expression is almost entirely at the transcriptional level.

The first example of such control was discovered using E . coli in the 1950s and 1960s by French researchers and is called the lac operon. The lac operon is a stretch of DNA with three adjacent genes that code for proteins that participate in the absorption and metabolism of lactose, a food source for E . coli . When lactose is not present in the bacterium’s environment, the lac genes are transcribed in small amounts. When lactose is present, the genes are transcribed and the bacterium is able to use the lactose as a food source. The operon also contains a promoter sequence to which the RNA polymerase binds to begin transcription; between the promoter and the three genes is a region called the operator. When there is no lactose present, a protein known as a repressor binds to the operator and prevents RNA polymerase from binding to the promoter, except in rare cases. Thus very little of the protein products of the three genes is made. When lactose is present, an end product of lactose metabolism binds to the repressor protein and prevents it from binding to the operator. This allows RNA polymerase to bind to the promoter and freely transcribe the three genes, allowing the organism to metabolize the lactose.

Questions & Answers

what is motion?
Abdulaziz Reply
where the solving of questions of this topic?
Bonifasi Reply
According to Nernst's distribution law there are about two solvents in which solutes undergo equilibria. But i don't understand how can you know which of two solvents goes bottom and one top? I real want to understand b'coz some books do say why they prefer one to top/bottom.
Elia Reply
I need chapter 25 last topic
Hafsa Reply
What is physics?
Abdulaziz
physics is the study of matter and energy in space and time and how they related to each other
Manzoor
interaction of matter and eneegy....
Abdullah
thanks for correcting me bro
Manzoor
What is electrostatics bassically?
Ehtisham Reply
study of charge at rest
wamis
A branch in physics that deals with statics electricity
Akona
what is PN junction?
Manzoor
please I don't understand the solution of the first example as in d working
habila Reply
what's the question? Write it here.
SABYASACHI
a cold body of 100°C and a hot body is of 100°F . Transfer heat = ?
jagan Reply
you are given two metal spheres mounted on portable insulating support. Find a way to give them equal and opposite charges. you may use a glass rod rubbed with silk but may not touch it to the spheres. Do the spheres have to be of equal size for your method to work?
Rai Reply
what is emotion?
Abdulaziz
in the 2nd example, for chapter 8.2 on page 3/3, I don't understand where the value 48uC comes from, I just couldn't get that value in my calculator.
Anita Reply
are you talking about the capacitance combination problem
sam
please write the problem or send a snap of th page....I don't have the book in my vicinity.
SABYASACHI
yes, the 2nd example called Network of Capacitors on page 3/3 of section 8.2.
Anita
12 V = (Q1/12uF)+(Q1/6uF). So, Q1 = 12x4 = 48 uC.
sam
ohhhh OK thanks so much!!!!!!!
Anita
hello guys,, I'm asking to know something about, How can i know which solvent goes down and which does up in determination of partion coefficient(Nernst's distribution law). Please Need help because i have seen many contradictions via few of text books even some videos on youtube they don't say
Elia
what is electromagnetic force. do electric and magnetic force happen differently
Short Reply
yes
Renugadevi
yes
Pranay
why
Godson
how?
Godson
when electric charge exert force on another electric charge then this force is known as electrostatic force and when a magnet exert force on another magnet then this force is known as magnetic force and when force exerted on magnet due to varying electric field then this electromagnetic force
Ilyas
Yes
Akona
derived the electric potential due to disk of charge
aron Reply
how can we derived potential electric due to the disk
aron
how can you derived electric potential of a disk
aron
how can you derived electric potential due to disk
aron
where is response?
aron
what is difference between heat and temperature?
Qasim Reply
temperature is the measure of degree of hotness or coldness. on the other hand, heat is the form of energy, which causes temperature. So we can safely say, heat is the reason and temperature is its consequence.
SABYASACHI
Heat is the reason and temperature is the consequences
Angela
how many liquid metals do we have
Jeffery Reply
do we have gasses as metals
Jeffery
who knows should please tell us
Sadiku
yes...gallium & cesium
Idris
Hg is liquid. No metal gasses at standard temp and pressure
Shane
I don't ever understand any of this formulae
isaac Reply
which formula
Sadiku
How to determine a temperature scale
Masia Reply
what is the formula for absolute error
Nyro
Got questions? Join the online conversation and get instant answers!
Jobilize.com Reply
Practice Key Terms 5

Get the best Algebra and trigonometry course in your pocket!





Source:  OpenStax, Molecular biology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 26, 2014 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11636/1.1
Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc.

Notification Switch

Would you like to follow the 'Molecular biology' conversation and receive update notifications?

Ask