<< Chapter < Page Chapter >> Page >

The graph matches the one from Step 3 with the addition a curved line that intersects with point A (from Step 1) and point C which appears on the dashed line added in Step 3. The graph also includes “s” along the y-axis with an arrow pointing down and “s” along the x-axis with an arrow pointing right.

Step 5. With the substitution effect in place, now choose utility-maximizing point B on the new opportunity set. When you choose point B, think about whether you wish the substitution or the income effect to have a larger impact on the good (in this case, candy) on the horizontal axis. If you choose point B to be directly in a vertical line with point A (as is illustrated here), then the income effect will be exactly offsetting the substitution effect on the horizontal axis. If you insert point B so that it lies a little to right of the original point A, then the substitution effect will exceed the income effect. If you insert point B so that it lies a little to the left of point A, then the income effect will exceed the substitution effect. The income effect is the movement from C to B, showing how choices shifted as a result of the decline in buying power and the movement between two levels of utility, with relative prices remaining the same. With normal goods, the negative income effect means less consumed of each good, as shown by the direction of the “i” (income effect) arrows on the vertical and horizontal axes. See [link] .

The graph matches the one from Step 4 with the addition of a curved line that intersects with point B which appears on the line added in Step 2. The shape of the curve matches the shape of the curve added in Step 4. The graph also includes “i” along the y-axis with an arrow pointing down and “i” along the x-axis with an arrow pointing left.

In sketching substitution and income effect diagrams, you may wish to practice some of the following variations: (1) Price falls instead of a rising; (2) The price change affects the good on either the vertical or the horizontal axis; (3) Sketch these diagrams so that the substitution effect exceeds the income effect; the income effect exceeds the substitution effect; and the two effects are equal.

One final note: The helpful dashed line can be drawn tangent to the new indifference curve, and parallel to the original budget line, rather than tangent to the original indifference curve and parallel to the new budget line. Some students find this approach more intuitively clear. The answers you get about the direction and relative sizes of the substitution and income effects, however, should be the same.

Key concepts and summary

An indifference curve is drawn on a budget constraint diagram that shows the tradeoffs between two goods. All points along a single indifference curve provide the same level of utility. Higher indifference curves represent higher levels of utility. Indifference curves slope downward because, if utility is to remain the same at all points along the curve, a reduction in the quantity of the good on the vertical axis must be counterbalanced by an increase in the quantity of the good on the horizontal axis (or vice versa). Indifference curves are steeper on the far left and flatter on the far right, because of diminishing marginal utility.

The utility-maximizing choice along a budget constraint will be the point of tangency where the budget constraint touches an indifference curve at a single point. A change in the price of any good has two effects: a substitution effect and an income effect. The substitution effect motivation encourages a utility-maximizer to buy less of what is relatively more expensive and more of what is relatively cheaper. The income effect motivation encourages a utility-maximizer to buy more of both goods if utility rises or less of both goods if utility falls (if they are both normal goods).

In a labor-leisure choice, every wage change has a substitution and an income effect. The substitution effect of a wage increase is to choose more income, since it is cheaper to earn, and less leisure, since its opportunity cost has increased. The income effect of a wage increase is to choose more of leisure and income, since they are both normal goods. The substitution and income effects of a wage decrease would reverse these directions.

In an intertemporal consumption choice, every interest rate change has a substitution and an income effect. The substitution effect of an interest rate increase is to choose more future consumption, since it is now cheaper to earn future consumption and less present consumption (more savings), since the opportunity cost of present consumption in terms of what is being given up in the future has increased. The income effect of an interest rate increase is to choose more of both present and future consumption, since they are both normal goods. The substitution and income effects of an interest rate decrease would reverse these directions.

Review questions

What point is preferred along an indifference curve?

Got questions? Get instant answers now!

Why do indifference curves slope down?

Got questions? Get instant answers now!

Why are indifference curves steep on the left and flatter on the right?

Got questions? Get instant answers now!

How many indifference curves does a person have?

Got questions? Get instant answers now!

How can you tell which indifference curves represent higher or lower levels of utility?

Got questions? Get instant answers now!

What is a substitution effect?

Got questions? Get instant answers now!

What is an income effect?

Got questions? Get instant answers now!

Does the “income effect” involve a change in income? Explain.

Got questions? Get instant answers now!

Does a change in price have both an income effect and a substitution effect? Does a change in income have both an income effect and a substitution effect?

Got questions? Get instant answers now!

Would you expect, in some cases, to see only an income effect or only a substitution effect? Explain.

Got questions? Get instant answers now!

Which is larger, the income effect or the substitution effect?

Got questions? Get instant answers now!

Questions & Answers

since price controls enacted by the government always has an unintended effects, the best way to control the market is to allow economic activities to run their cause
Japheth Reply
Microeconomics is the Study of allocating limited resources to solve the problems of optimizations.Explain this statement with suitable example.
Aruna Reply
Microeconomics is called price theory.Why?
Aruna
because it is a individual theory producer can set price acc to his benefit
mithlesh
who was the father of macroeconomics?
Eyob Reply
Alfred Marshall
Aruna
John Maynard Keynes
hosneara
What is economic
rafi Reply
Economy is everything...
Htoo
An economy is an area of the production, distribution and trade, as well as consumption of goods and services by different agents. In general, it is defined 'as a social domain that emphasize the practices, discourses, and material expressions associated with the production, use, and management of
Muhammad
Thanks
Abdullahi
will I be able to get Macroeconomic book?
Dhieumarial Reply
difference between monopolistic competition and monopolist markets
Nancy Reply
Cardinal utility theory assumes that consumers can
Siphelele Reply
why are price ceiling and price floor said to be efficient?
Mariateretia Reply
they are called inefficient, price floor or a price ceiling will prevent a market from adjusting to its equilibrium price and quantity, thus creating an inefficient outcome.
Stuti
please how did we get fixed cost, marginal and average cost. thanks
Onovo Reply
can any one help me solve pie chart, bar chart and histogram. thanks
Onovo
any answers please, thank you
Onovo
solution on average cost and marginal cost
Onovo
p= -10+0.05p
Dil
Create the supply curve
Dil
plz help..
Dil
are u sure that it is p? it should have two variables. Qd should be there too
Stuti
if you have two variable, put different values of p to get q and you will have coordinates that u can use to make the supply curve.
Stuti
Fixed cost remain constant,when we r going to gain marginal cost so we should increase in additional unit/variables to get marginal cost with the increase in mc then we easily get average cost
Bilal
Answer the below question to best of your ability by employing the tax concept and supply and demand Suppose the supply of tobacco is elastic and the demand for tobacco is inelastic. If an excise tax is levied on the suppliers of tobacco, will the incidence fall mostly on consumers or mostly on pro
Carolyn Reply
first you suppose the demand for tobacco is elastic that means if price change more change would occur in demand and second you suppose tax has been lived on suppliers that means the price of tobacco will rise up and it's demand will decline that means consumer will start consuming less
Wani
what is perfect competition
Masciline Reply
perfect competition is the form of market where sellers are selling homogeneous product to buyers homogeneous product means a product which is same colour ,same brand and same cost has been used .
Wani
WHAT IS OPPORTUNITY COST AND GIVE EXAMPLES
Werku Reply
What Is opportunity cost and give examples fot it?
Werku
Opportunity cost means profit of what you have give up in order to choose something else
Wani
example of opportunity cost . we take example of land.As land have alternative uses it can be use for production , for building factories on it or for construction of house . suppose you are the owner of land and you build house on it that means you give up the benefit which you may get in produ
Wani
the benefit which you didn't get in production or in building factories is called opportunity cost
Wani
opportunity cost is the cost of what you give up to get something. example: if u wanna buy an apple and a mango and end up buying only a mango. your opportunity cost is the cost of the Apple the you've given up
ebrima
define marginal rate of substitution
Roshan Reply
marginal rate of substitution
Lengha
The rate at which one product can be substituted for another is called MRS.
Ramachandra
how much additional units of a product under consideration is required to deliver the same level of satisfaction that one derives from an additional unit of a given product.
Simply untill the satisfaction one icreased another decreased also depends upon the satisfaction power of a commodity
Bilal
Why indifference curve does not intersect x axis and y axis
Bilal
If the two products are perfect substitutes it will touch both axis. In your question, it is assumed that these are not perfect substitutes. If it touches any axis, it shows that with the given quantity of one product alone gives the same level of satisfaction.
Ramachandra
the intersection at the axis would mean that the product is perfectly substitutable and hence the indifference analysis is non-existent.
what industry monopolies belongs
Gwayi Reply
what are the causes of shift in demand curve to the right
Gideon Reply
what industry monopolies belongs
Gwayi

Get Jobilize Job Search Mobile App in your pocket Now!

Get it on Google Play Download on the App Store Now




Source:  OpenStax, Microeconomics. OpenStax CNX. Aug 03, 2014 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11627/1.10
Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc.

Notification Switch

Would you like to follow the 'Microeconomics' conversation and receive update notifications?

Ask