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Entry to a cell can occur by endocytosis . For most kinds of host cells, pathogens use one of two different mechanisms for endocytosis and entry. One mechanism relies on effector proteins secreted by the pathogen; these effector proteins trigger entry into the host cell. This is the method that Salmonella and Shigella use when invading intestinal epithelial cells. When these pathogens come in contact with epithelial cells in the intestine, they secrete effector molecules that cause protrusions of membrane ruffles that bring the bacterial cell in. This process is called membrane ruffling . The second mechanism relies on surface proteins expressed on the pathogen that bind to receptors on the host cell, resulting in entry. For example, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis produces a surface protein known as invasin that binds to beta-1 integrins expressed on the surface of host cells.

Some host cells, such as white blood cells and other phagocytes of the immune system, actively endocytose pathogens in a process called phagocytosis. Although phagocytosis allows the pathogen to gain entry to the host cell, in most cases, the host cell kills and degrades the pathogen by using digestive enzymes. Normally, when a pathogen is ingested by a phagocyte, it is enclosed within a phagosome in the cytoplasm; the phagosome fuses with a lysosome to form a phagolysosome, where digestive enzymes kill the pathogen (see Pathogen Recognition and Phagocytosis ). However, some intracellular pathogens have the ability to survive and multiply within phagocytes. Examples include Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella ; these bacteria produce proteins that lyse the phagosome before it fuses with the lysosome, allowing the bacteria to escape into the phagocyte’s cytoplasm where they can multiply. Bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis , Legionella pneumophila , and Salmonella species use a slightly different mechanism to evade being digested by the phagocyte. These bacteria prevent the fusion of the phagosome with the lysosome, thus remaining alive and dividing within the phagosome.

Infection

Following invasion, successful multiplication of the pathogen leads to infection. Infections can be described as local, focal, or systemic, depending on the extent of the infection. A local infection is confined to a small area of the body, typically near the portal of entry. For example, a hair follicle infected by Staphylococcus aureus infection may result in a boil around the site of infection, but the bacterium is largely contained to this small location. Other examples of local infections that involve more extensive tissue involvement include urinary tract infections confined to the bladder or pneumonia confined to the lungs.

In a focal infection , a localized pathogen, or the toxins it produces, can spread to a secondary location. For example, a dental hygienist nicking the gum with a sharp tool can lead to a local infection in the gum by Streptococcus bacteria of the normal oral microbiota. These Streptococcus spp. may then gain access to the bloodstream and make their way to other locations in the body, resulting in a secondary infection.

Questions & Answers

what is microbiology
vijay Reply
microbiology is the scientific study of microorganisms .microorganisms are those organisms that are too small to see with the naked eye ex-bacteria fungi
Yashkin
a branch of biological science concerned with organisms that can not be observed with a naked eye
Mooya
what are the types of granulocytes and explain
lord
polymorpho nuclear leukocyte, known as granulocyte are divide into three,1-polymorpho eosinophil 2-polymorpho basophil 3-polymorpho neutrophil
Musa
I want to know more about sample collection on the field
Ama Reply
blood collection and urinarysis
Lizzy
2143
Lizzy
yes
Lizzy
In the periodic table the number on the upper left hand side is what
Aurelia Reply
Hydrogen
Tob
am not talking about the elements
Aurelia
Is it the atomic number or the mass number
Aurelia
hologen
Usman
differences between acid fast and non acid fast bacilli
ANTHONY Reply
acid fast have cell wall that holds to carbol fuschin stain while non acid fast doesn't have. it readily releases out the primary stain the carbol fuschin.
LAFIA
where do I post a question that isn't related to that topic
eklectc
hi everyone
kennedy
hello
Olivia
for sure, this question is not related to the topic.
LAFIA
can someone explain the process of glycolysis and the electron transport chain? I'm so freakin lost. it loses carbons, gains hydroxyls, gains, loses Hydrogens....ugh it's like a foreign language to me! or direct me to a youTube video or something that will make this seem easier to concept?
eklectc
it's a loaded question, sorry!
eklectc
why is DNA a genetic material
Mcbeth Reply
DNA is genetic material because it contains chromosome contains the traits which includes characters and behavioral characteristics
chima
why is it difficulty to classfy protista
Tanaka
Good
Eddy
what is infection prevention
Muhammed Reply
good hygiene
Dhaqan
way of preventing disease causing germs
henry
maintenance of sterilization
Pooja
h
Faustina
describe the components of the epidemiology triangle
Muhammed Reply
Hai
Nantongo
hii
Md
where from you
Md
i am Indian
Md
you
Md
Hello friend
effiong
How are you people doing
effiong
أ‌) Host factor ب) pathogen ج) environment
Widad
Hello
Kofi
Hi
Widad
hey hi
kalai
The epidemiologic triangle is made up of three parts: agent, host and environment
Princess
please can a microbiologist will work at hospital
Usman
what are the fluids used in biochemistry Lab used to diagnose diseases
Jb Reply
fadumo qule a gemil3
fadumo Reply
Faadum mahamud disease micro biology
fadumo
makuway diinkaraan suaalo
fadumo
history of microbiology
Balqees Reply
Penicillin is caused by what microorganism
Balqees
Penicillin is caused by what microorganism
Balqees
penicillium notatum
Pooja
M sorry I mean penicillin is caused by what Fungi
Balqees
penicillium fungi
Pooja
when I finish with my bsc in microbiology where wil I work
Usman
Why can we see ourselves in a mirror?
Usman
mention 5 characteristics of prokaryotic cell and also 5 characteristics of euryotic cell
Grace Reply
PROKARYOTES _ does not have nucleus _does not have membrane bound organels like eukaryotes -does not have endoplasmic reticulum _does not have a mitchochondrion _it have plasmid instead of chromosome EUKARYOTE S _have true nucleus _have all membrane bound organels _have mitochondria have
Pooja
continuation _have endoplasmic reticulum _have chromosomes does not have plasmid
Pooja
antigenisity define
kalai
explanation of spores
nahida Reply
what specific types of biological macromolecules do living things require?
Jonathan Reply
define spores its classification
nahida
define spores its structure and classification
nahida
what is a complement
Alecia Reply
something which completes or combine with something else to make it complete.
Kosi
hello
Kosi
medical microbiology
Kosi
you?
Kosi
hi
Amina
Guys who's doing nursing in here
Mumba
I have a question
Mumba
what's the importance of microbiology in nursing
Mumba
yah
Mumba
wow..nice meeting you
Kosi
thanks
Mumba
for
Mumba
anytime
Mumba
microbiology also important for understanding the communicable or non-communicable disease in our hospitals...which is very important for patients and healthy people.
Kiran
what is a microbial flora
Chetan
normal microbial flora
Chetan
Definition of microbiology?
Mohamed Reply
study of microorganisms is known as microbiology
Pooja
no
Mumba
microbiology is the study of small or minute organisms that cannot be seen with our naked eyes but with the aid of a microscope
Mumba

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Source:  OpenStax, Microbiology. OpenStax CNX. Nov 01, 2016 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col12087/1.4
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