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Section Exercises are organized by question type, and generally appear in the following order:

  • Verbal questions assess conceptual understanding of key terms and concepts.
  • Algebraic problems require students to apply algebraic manipulations demonstrated in the section.
  • Graphical problems assess students’ ability to interpret or produce a graph.
  • Numeric problems require the student perform calculations or computations.
  • Technology problems encourage exploration through use of a graphing utility, either to visualize or verify algebraic results or to solve problems via an alternative to the methods demonstrated in the section.
  • Extensions pose problems more challenging than the Examples demonstrated in the section. They require students to synthesize multiple learning objectives or apply critical thinking to solve complex problems.
  • Real-World Applications present realistic problem scenarios from fields such as physics, geology, biology, finance, and the social sciences.

Chapter review features

Each chapter concludes with a review of the most important takeaways, as well as additional practice problems that students can use to prepare for exams.

  • Key Terms provides a formal definition for each bold-faced term in the chapter.
  • Key Equations presents a compilation of formulas, theorems, and standard-form equations.
  • Key Concepts summarizes the most important ideas introduced in each section, linking back to the relevant Example(s) in case students need to review.
  • Chapter Review Exercises include 40-80 practice problems that recall the most important concepts from each section.
  • Practice Test includes 25-50 problems assessing the most important learning objectives from the chapter. Note that the practice test is not organized by section, and may be more heavily weighted toward cumulative objectives as opposed to the foundational objectives covered in the opening sections.
  • Answer Key includes the answers to all Try It exercises and every other exercise from the Section Exercises, Chapter Review Exercises, and Practice Test.

Ancillaries

OpenStax projects offer an array of ancillaries for students and instructors. Currently the following resources are available.

  • Instructor’s Solutions Manual
  • Student’s Solutions Manual
  • PowerPoint Slides

Please visit http://openstaxcollege.org to view an up-to-date list of the Learning Resources for this title and to find information on accessing these resources.

Online homework

WebAssign

WebAssign is an independent online homework and assessment solution first launched at North Carolina State University in 1997. Today, WebAssign is an employee-owned benefit corporation and participates in the education of over a million students each year. WebAssign empowers faculty to deliver fully customizable assignments and high quality content to their students in an interactive online environment. WebAssign supports Precalculus with hundreds of problems covering every concept in the course, each containing algorithmically-generated values and links directly to the eBook providing a completely integrated online learning experience.

Learningpod is the best place to find high-quality practice and homework questions. Through our partnership with OpenStax we offer easy-to-use assignment and reporting tools for professors and a beautiful practice experience for students. You can find questions directly from this textbook on Learningpod.com or through the OpenStax mobile app. Look for our links at the end of each chapter!
Practice questions on the Learningpod website: www.learningpod.com
Download the OpenStax Companion Workbooks app (iOS): http://bit.ly/openstaxworkbooks

About our team

Lead author, senior content expert

Jay Abramson has been teaching Precalculus for 33 years, the last 14 at Arizona State University, where he is a principal lecturer in the School of Mathematics and Statistics. His accomplishments at ASU include co-developing the university’s first hybrid and online math courses as well as an extensive library of video lectures and tutorials. In addition, he has served as a contributing author for two of Pearson Education’s math programs, NovaNet Precalculus and Trigonometry. Prior to coming to ASU, Jay taught at Texas State Technical College and Amarillo College. He received Teacher of the Year awards at both institutions.

Contributing authors

  • Valeree Falduto, Palm Beach State College
  • Rachael Gross, Towson University
  • David Lippman, Pierce College
  • Melonie Rasmussen, Pierce College
  • Rick Norwood, East Tennessee State University
  • Nicholas Belloit, Florida State College Jacksonville
  • Jean-Marie Magnier, Springfield Technical Community College
  • Harold Whipple
  • Christina Fernandez

Faculty reviewers and consultants

  • Nina Alketa, Cecil College
  • Kiran Bhutani, Catholic University of America
  • Brandie Biddy, Cecil College
  • Lisa Blank, Lyme Central School
  • Bryan Blount, Kentucky Wesleyan College
  • Jessica Bolz, The Bryn Mawr School
  • Sheri Boyd, Rollins College
  • Sarah Brewer, Alabama School of Math and Science
  • Charles Buckley, St. Gregory's University
  • Michael Cohen, Hofstra University
  • Kenneth Crane, Texarkana College
  • Rachel Cywinski, Alamo Colleges
  • Nathan Czuba
  • Srabasti Dutta, Ashford University
  • Kristy Erickson, Cecil College
  • Nicole Fernandez, Georgetown University / Kent State University
  • David French, Tidewater Community College
  • Douglas Furman, SUNY Ulster
  • Lance Hemlow, Raritan Valley Community College
  • Erinn Izzo, Nicaragua Christian Academy
  • John Jaffe
  • Jerry Jared, Blue Ridge School
  • Stan Kopec, Mount Wachusett Community College
  • Kathy Kovacs
  • Cynthia Landrigan, Erie Community College
  • Sara Lenhart, Christopher Newport University
  • Wendy Lightheart, Lane Community College
  • Joanne Manville, Bunker Hill Community College
  • Karla McCavit, Albion College
  • Cynthia McGinnis, Northwest Florida State College
  • Lana Neal, University of Texas at Austin
  • Rhonda Porter, Albany State University
  • Steven Purtee, Valencia College
  • William Radulovich, Florida State College Jacksonville
  • Alice Ramos, Bethel College
  • Nick Reynolds, Montgomery Community College
  • Amanda Ross, A. A. Ross Consulting and Research, LLC
  • Erica Rutter, Arizona State University
  • Sutandra Sarkar, Georgia State University
  • Willy Schild, Wentworth Institute of Technology
  • Todd Stephen, Cleveland State University
  • Scott Sykes, University of West Georgia
  • Linda Tansil, Southeast Missouri State University
  • John Thomas, College of Lake County
  • Diane Valade, Piedmont Virginia Community College
  • Allen Wolmer, Atlanta Jewish Academy

Questions & Answers

what is a function?
CJ Reply
I want to learn about the law of exponent
Quera Reply
explain this
Hinderson Reply
what is functions?
Angel Reply
A mathematical relation such that every input has only one out.
Spiro
yes..it is a relationo of orders pairs of sets one or more input that leads to a exactly one output.
Mubita
Is a rule that assigns to each element X in a set A exactly one element, called F(x), in a set B.
RichieRich
If the plane intersects the cone (either above or below) horizontally, what figure will be created?
Feemark Reply
can you not take the square root of a negative number
Sharon Reply
No because a negative times a negative is a positive. No matter what you do you can never multiply the same number by itself and end with a negative
lurverkitten
Actually you can. you get what's called an Imaginary number denoted by i which is represented on the complex plane. The reply above would be correct if we were still confined to the "real" number line.
Liam
Suppose P= {-3,1,3} Q={-3,-2-1} and R= {-2,2,3}.what is the intersection
Elaine Reply
can I get some pretty basic questions
Ama Reply
In what way does set notation relate to function notation
Ama
is precalculus needed to take caculus
Amara Reply
It depends on what you already know. Just test yourself with some precalculus questions. If you find them easy, you're good to go.
Spiro
the solution doesn't seem right for this problem
Mars Reply
what is the domain of f(x)=x-4/x^2-2x-15 then
Conney Reply
x is different from -5&3
Seid
All real x except 5 and - 3
Spiro
***youtu.be/ESxOXfh2Poc
Loree
how to prroved cos⁴x-sin⁴x= cos²x-sin²x are equal
jeric Reply
Don't think that you can.
Elliott
By using some imaginary no.
Tanmay
how do you provided cos⁴x-sin⁴x = cos²x-sin²x are equal
jeric Reply
What are the question marks for?
Elliott
Someone should please solve it for me Add 2over ×+3 +y-4 over 5 simplify (×+a)with square root of two -×root 2 all over a multiply 1over ×-y{(×-y)(×+y)} over ×y
Abena Reply
For the first question, I got (3y-2)/15 Second one, I got Root 2 Third one, I got 1/(y to the fourth power) I dont if it's right cause I can barely understand the question.
Is under distribute property, inverse function, algebra and addition and multiplication function; so is a combined question
Abena
find the equation of the line if m=3, and b=-2
Ashley Reply
graph the following linear equation using intercepts method. 2x+y=4
Ashley
how
Wargod
what?
John
ok, one moment
UriEl
how do I post your graph for you?
UriEl
it won't let me send an image?
UriEl
also for the first one... y=mx+b so.... y=3x-2
UriEl
y=mx+b you were already given the 'm' and 'b'. so.. y=3x-2
Tommy
Please were did you get y=mx+b from
Abena
y=mx+b is the formula of a straight line. where m = the slope & b = where the line crosses the y-axis. In this case, being that the "m" and "b", are given, all you have to do is plug them into the formula to complete the equation.
Tommy
thanks Tommy
Nimo
0=3x-2 2=3x x=3/2 then . y=3/2X-2 I think
Given
co ordinates for x x=0,(-2,0) x=1,(1,1) x=2,(2,4)
neil

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Source:  OpenStax, Precalculus. OpenStax CNX. Jan 19, 2016 Download for free at https://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11667/1.6
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