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Learning objectives

  • Identify the signs of inflammation and fever and explain why they occur
  • Explain the advantages and risks posed by inflammatory responses

The inflammatory response, or inflammation , is triggered by a cascade of chemical mediators and cellular responses that may occur when cells are damaged and stressed or when pathogens successfully breach the physical barriers of the innate immune system. Although inflammation is typically associated with negative consequences of injury or disease, it is a necessary process insofar as it allows for recruitment of the cellular defenses needed to eliminate pathogens, remove damaged and dead cells, and initiate repair mechanisms. Excessive inflammation, however, can result in local tissue damage and, in severe cases, may even become deadly.

Acute inflammation

An early, if not immediate, response to tissue injury is acute inflammation . Immediately following an injury, vasoconstriction of blood vessels will occur to minimize blood loss. The amount of vasoconstriction is related to the amount of vascular injury, but it is usually brief. Vasoconstriction is followed by vasodilation and increased vascular permeability, as a direct result of the release of histamine from resident mast cells. Increased blood flow and vascular permeability can dilute toxins and bacterial products at the site of injury or infection. They also contribute to the five observable signs associated with the inflammatory response: erythema (redness), edema (swelling), heat, pain, and altered function. Vasodilation and increased vascular permeability are also associated with an influx of phagocytes at the site of injury and/or infection. This can enhance the inflammatory response because phagocytes may release proinflammatory chemicals when they are activated by cellular distress signals released from damaged cells, by PAMPs , or by opsonins on the surface of pathogens. Activation of the complement system can further enhance the inflammatory response through the production of the anaphylatoxin C5a. [link] illustrates a typical case of acute inflammation at the site of a skin wound.

a) a diagram of a wound in the skin that has let pathogens enter. Mast cells release histamines which signal to cells in the blood stream. B) The cells have left the blood stream; these phagocytes are engulfing the pathogens.
(a) Mast cells detect injury to nearby cells and release histamine, initiating an inflammatory response. (b) Histamine increases blood flow to the wound site, and increased vascular permeability allows fluid, proteins, phagocytes, and other immune cells to enter infected tissue. These events result in the swelling and reddening of the injured site, and the increased blood flow to the injured site causes it to feel warm. Inflammation is also associated with pain due to these events stimulating nerve pain receptors in the tissue. The interaction of phagocyte PRRs with cellular distress signals and PAMPs and opsonins on the surface of pathogens leads to the release of more proinflammatory chemicals, enhancing the inflammatory response.

During the period of inflammation, the release of bradykinin causes capillaries to remain dilated, flooding tissues with fluids and leading to edema. Increasing numbers of neutrophils are recruited to the area to fight pathogens. As the fight rages on, pus forms from the accumulation of neutrophils, dead cells, tissue fluids, and lymph. Typically, after a few days, macrophages will help to clear out this pus. Eventually, tissue repair can begin in the wounded area.

Questions & Answers

characteristic of Gram negative bacteria
jane Reply
Characteristics of Gram Negative Bacteria As with Gram positive bacteria, Gram negative bacteria also contain the peptidoglycan polymer in their cell wall. While this polymer is thin (2 to 4 nanometers in thickness with just about 3 layers of peptidoglycan) in Gram negative bacteria, it's also com
Kaviya
it's also composed of long glycan strands that are cross-linked by peptide molecules. This composition serves a number of functions including protecting the bacterial cell from lysis
Kaviya
Good shot
Enoch
Thanks 😊
Kaviya
what was Hans Christian Gram's supported in the modern Microbiology?
Wilson Reply
what is microbial growth
Chisa Reply
The organism responsible for vulva ulcers
nyiter Reply
Why are vascular pathogen poorly communicable from person to person?
Aj Reply
Most vascular pathogens are poorly communicable from person to person because they need a medium to be communicated i,e a vector that would carry them from one person to other
Kaviya
what's the habit of protista
Afieahngwi Reply
They show both autotrophic and heterotrophic mechanisms...
Swetha
thanks
Afieahngwi
welcome...
Swetha
let me mention some water. Air .Food and so on
Gattiek Reply
causes of infectious diseases
Afieahngwi Reply
water.Air
Gattiek
infectious disease are caused by pathogenic micro organisms like bacteria ,fungi..
Swetha
What is pasteurization?
Wilson
are fungi prokaryote or eukaryotes?
Afieahngwi Reply
fungi are eukaryotes.
Swetha
All fungi are eukaryotes. Even micro fungi.
Lad
have..complex cellular organization and membrane bound nucleus ...and..also... having loops of DNA( like plasmids) as.bacteria
Swetha
what enzyme replaces rna nucleotides with dna nucleotides during replication?
Remi Reply
an enzyme called DNA ligase.
Jael
describe the acid fast staining procedure used in the diagnosis of tuberculosis
Salma Reply
bacterial morphology
lf_ Reply
what is the difference between biogenesis & abiogenesis
Mayuri Reply
biogenesis is when living comes out from other living things as a result of reproduction while a biogenesis is the process where living things comes out from non living things
Usman
living things come form other form living things is biogenesis. ....right?
Mayuri
what is mean by pasturation method?
Mayuri Reply
Pasteurization is a process that kills harmful bacteria and creates an extended shelf life for your milk. ... It's pretty simple—we take the milk from the cows, we rapidly heat it to a high enough temperature to kill the bacteria, and then we cool it back down before packaging and shipping it to you
Kaviya
tell me about abiogenessis &biogenesis
Mayuri
discribe aristol spontaneous generation theory in brif
Mayuri Reply
The Greek philosopher Aristotle (384–322 BC) was one of the earliest recorded scholars to articulate the theory of spontaneous generation, the notion that life can arise from nonliving matter. Aristotle proposed that life arose from nonliving material if the material contained pneuma (“vital heat”).
Kaviya
thank you 😊
Mayuri
No mention dear 😊
Kaviya

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Source:  OpenStax, Microbiology. OpenStax CNX. Nov 01, 2016 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col12087/1.4
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