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Elasticity also reveals whether firms can pass higher costs that they incur on to consumers. Addictive substances tend to fall into this category. For example, the demand for cigarettes is relatively inelastic among regular smokers who are somewhat addicted; economic research suggests that increasing the price of cigarettes by 10% leads to about a 3% reduction in the quantity of cigarettes smoked by adults, so the elasticity of demand for cigarettes is 0.3. If society increases taxes on companies that make cigarettes, the result will be, as in [link] (a), that the supply curve shifts from S 0 to S 1 . However, as the equilibrium moves from E 0 to E 1 , these taxes are mainly passed along to consumers in the form of higher prices. These higher taxes on cigarettes will raise tax revenue for the government, but they will not much affect the quantity of smoking.

If the goal is to reduce the quantity of cigarettes demanded, it must be achieved by shifting this inelastic demand back to the left, perhaps with public programs to discourage the use of cigarettes or to help people to quit. For example, anti-smoking advertising campaigns have shown some ability to reduce smoking. However, if demand for cigarettes was more elastic, as in [link] (b), then an increase in taxes that shifts supply from S 0 to S 1 and equilibrium from E 0 to E 1 would reduce the quantity of cigarettes smoked substantially. Youth smoking seems to be more elastic than adult smoking—that is, the quantity of youth smoking will fall by a greater percentage than the quantity of adult smoking in response to a given percentage increase in price.

Passing along higher costs to consumers

These two graphs show how a supply shift affects price and quantity. Figure (a) shows how supply shifts when demand is inelastic and figure (b) shows how supply shifts when demand is elastic.
Higher costs, like a higher tax on cigarette companies for the example given in the text, lead supply to shift to the left. This shift is identical in (a) and (b). However, in (a), where demand is inelastic, the cost increase can largely be passed along to consumers in the form of higher prices, without much of a decline in equilibrium quantity. In (b), demand is elastic, so the shift in supply results primarily in a lower equilibrium quantity. Consumers suffer in either case, but in (a), they suffer from paying a higher price for the same quantity, while in (b), they suffer from buying a lower quantity (and presumably needing to shift their consumption elsewhere).

Elasticity and tax incidence

The example of cigarette taxes showed that because demand is inelastic, taxes are not effective at reducing the equilibrium quantity of smoking, and they are mainly passed along to consumers in the form of higher prices. The analysis, or manner, of how the burden of a tax is divided between consumers and producers is called tax incidence    . Typically, the incidence, or burden, of a tax falls both on the consumers and producers of the taxed good. But if one wants to predict which group will bear most of the burden, all one needs to do is examine the elasticity of demand and supply. In the tobacco example, the tax burden falls on the most inelastic side of the market.

Questions & Answers

What is the difference between pure monopoly and natural monopoly
Joseph Reply
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Alex
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GODWIN Reply
what's the opportunity cost for free goods?
Bah
what is the demand and supply of QD is equal to 4040 thousand
Prince Reply
uses and limitations of elasticity of demand concept
Tinodaishe
Elasticity of demand refers to the degree of responsiveness of quantities
grace Reply
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Ogbonna
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Ogbonna
I need all the formula for elasticity of demand
Dogbeda Reply
%∆QD/%∆P formula for elasticity of demand
divine
for that of income elasticity %∆QD / %∆I
divine
and that of cross elasticity of demand %∆QDx / %∆Py
divine
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3400
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it controls only price or production not both a same time
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Difference between demand and supply
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demand talks about the consumers and supply also talks about producers
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demand talks about the relationship between price and the quantity demanded for a certain goods and supply talks about the relationship between price and quantity supply of a certain goods .
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demand show the quality demanded at different price n time whereas supply show the quality ready to sell in market by seller at different price n time.
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Source:  OpenStax, Principles of economics. OpenStax CNX. Sep 19, 2014 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11613/1.11
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