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Netflix on-demand media

Photo of the Netflix Watch Instantly tab to watch movies and TV episodes instantly via streaming media
Netflix, Inc. is an American provider of on-demand Internet streaming media to many countries around the world, including the United States, and of flat rate DVD-by-mail in the United States. (Credit: modification of work by Traci Lawson/Flickr Creative Commons)

That will be how much?

Imagine going to your favorite coffee shop and having the waiter inform you the pricing has changed. Instead of $3 for a cup of coffee, you will now be charged $2 for coffee, $1 for creamer, and $1 for your choice of sweetener. If you pay your usual $3 for a cup of coffee, you must choose between creamer and sweetener. If you want both, you now face an extra charge of $1. Sound absurd? Well, that is the situation Netflix customers found themselves in—a 60% price hike to retain the same service in 2011.

In early 2011, Netflix consumers paid about $10 a month for a package consisting of streaming video and DVD rentals. In July 2011, the company announced a packaging change. Customers wishing to retain both streaming video and DVD rental would be charged $15.98 per month, a price increase of about 60%. In 2014, Netflix also raised its streaming video subscription price from $7.99 to $8.99 per month for new U.S. customers. The company also changed its policy of 4K streaming content from $9.00 to $12.00 per month that year.

How would customers of the 18-year-old firm react? Would they abandon Netflix? Would the ease of access to other venues make a difference in how consumers responded to the Netflix price change? The answers to those questions will be explored in this chapter: the change in quantity with respect to a change in price, a concept economists call elasticity.

Introduction to elasticity

In this chapter, you will learn about:

  • Price Elasticity of Demand and Price Elasticity of Supply
  • Polar Cases of Elasticity and Constant Elasticity
  • Elasticity and Pricing
  • Elasticity in Areas Other Than Price

Anyone who has studied economics knows the law of demand: a higher price will lead to a lower quantity demanded. What you may not know is how much lower the quantity demanded will be. Similarly, the law of supply shows that a higher price will lead to a higher quantity supplied. The question is: How much higher? This chapter will explain how to answer these questions and why they are critically important in the real world.

To find answers to these questions, we need to understand the concept of elasticity. Elasticity is an economics concept that measures responsiveness of one variable to changes in another variable. Suppose you drop two items from a second-floor balcony. The first item is a tennis ball. The second item is a brick. Which will bounce higher? Obviously, the tennis ball. We would say that the tennis ball has greater elasticity.

Consider an economic example. Cigarette taxes are an example of a “sin tax,” a tax on something that is bad for you, like alcohol. Cigarettes are taxed at the state and national levels. State taxes range from a low of 17 cents per pack in Missouri to $4.35 per pack in New York. The average state cigarette tax is $1.51 per pack. The 2014 federal tax rate on cigarettes was $1.01 per pack, but in 2015 the Obama Administration proposed raising the federal tax nearly a dollar to $1.95 per pack. The key question is: How much would cigarette purchases decline?

Taxes on cigarettes serve two purposes: to raise tax revenue for government and to discourage consumption of cigarettes. However, if a higher cigarette tax discourages consumption by quite a lot, meaning a greatly reduced quantity of cigarettes is sold, then the cigarette tax on each pack will not raise much revenue for the government. Alternatively, a higher cigarette tax that does not discourage consumption by much will actually raise more tax revenue for the government. Thus, when a government agency tries to calculate the effects of altering its cigarette tax, it must analyze how much the tax affects the quantity of cigarettes consumed. This issue reaches beyond governments and taxes; every firm faces a similar issue. Every time a firm considers raising the price that it charges, it must consider how much a price increase will reduce the quantity demanded of what it sells. Conversely, when a firm puts its products on sale, it must expect (or hope) that the lower price will lead to a significantly higher quantity demanded.

Questions & Answers

Demand is set to be enlastic when its what
bohvy Reply
more than boll had him had bhaag......
SHADAB
Cant you speak in English
john
a little
Tith
I do speak English.. the question is Demand is set to be elasticity went the dash *2
bohvy
if I want some document from,that 9k?
Tith
why is scarcity a fundamental problem in economic
Abubakar Reply
what is demand curve
Takyi Reply
xplain
Ubong
thanks for your help with the same....
SHADAB
What is elasticity of demand
Karim
what is opportunity cost
Samuel Reply
Opportunity cost which also mean real cost it is a term used for foregone alternatives
john
what is demand
ikea Reply
Demand may simply be define as the total quantity of good or service a consumer are willing to buy at a specific price within a period of time.
john
your language is tough
techy Reply
How economics is related to other subjects?
Mikateko Reply
It is social science related subjects
john
How ? explain
Mikateko
and something else help me about business cycle
Mikateko
s classified as a social science. This view makes eco­nomics an academic relative of political science, sociology, psychology and anthropology. All of these disciplines study the behaviour of human beings individually and in groups.
john
The business cycle describes the rise and fall in production output of goods and services in an economy. Business cycles are generally measured using the rise and fall in the real gross domestic product (GDP) or the GDP.
john
hello everyone
Selena
hii
Yes
hello selena
Yes
How are you doing every one
john
hello Selena
Yes
hi
NONSO
yes
NONSO
What Is Economic Growth?
Saviour Reply
is the increase of quantity of goods ans services
Hashi
what is economic
Yomina Reply
Economic may be define as the science which studies human behaviour in relationship with end and scarce which have alternative use. This definition was drafted by Lionel robbin
john
good
Tith
it is science of wealth.
SHADAB
if I want some documents from you ,Are you ok?
Tith
it is not only wealth as well as welfare also.as well as scarce means of ends,for human satisfaction for alternative uses.
Avijit
economics applications
techy
who should study economics
Mary Reply
hi
Adu
How are you doing
john
finr
Tith
sorry, fine
Tith
and you?
Tith
Good
Adu
where do you live?
Tith
Accra n u
Adu
what's the difference between elasticity and demand
Rich Reply
if country had a potential full employment income of Rs 1000 and following consumption and investment function C=0.75 y=50,I=150.find the level of government expenditure necessary to maintain full employment
Vijay Reply
what is China's economy
Ved
the meaning of elasticity
Yawe Reply
when equilibrium is égal to 1
Moussa
The tendency to change consumption habits with change in price
Iben
The type of elasticity if demand
Okonkwo Reply
aren't leaving too about bathrooms
SHADAB
I don't understand
Amina
like.
Ubong
Price elasticity of demand cross elasticity of demand income elasticity of demand
Lawrence
what is money
Lawal Reply
what is supply
Lawal
the total number of goods present at a particular area at a particular time
Offset

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Source:  OpenStax, Principles of economics. OpenStax CNX. Sep 19, 2014 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11613/1.11
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