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Neoclassical economists will not tend to see aggregate demand as a useful tool for reducing unemployment; after all, if economic output is determined by a vertical aggregate supply curve , then aggregate demand has no long-run effect on unemployment. Instead, neoclassical economists believe that aggregate demand should be allowed to expand only to match the gradual shifts of aggregate supply to the right—keeping the price level much the same and inflationary pressures low.

If aggregate demand rises rapidly in the neoclassical model, in the long run it leads only to inflationary pressures. [link] shows a vertical LRAS curve and three different levels of aggregate demand, rising from AD 0 to AD 1 to AD 2 . As the macroeconomic equilibrium rises from E 0 to E 1 to E 2 , the price level rises, but real GDP does not budge; nor does the rate of unemployment, which adjusts to its natural rate. Conversely, reducing inflation has no long-term costs, either. Think about [link] in reverse, as the aggregate demand curve shifts from AD 2 to AD 1 to AD 0 , and the equilibrium moves from E 2 to E 1 to E 0 . During this process, the price level falls, but, in the long run, neither real GDP nor the natural rate of unemployment is changed.

How aggregate demand determines the price level in the long run

The graph shows three aggregate demand curves that all intersect with the vertical potential GDP line at around 62 on the x-axis, but at different price levels.
As aggregate demand shifts to the right, from AD 0 to AD 1 to AD 2 , real GDP in this economy and the level of unemployment do not change. However, there is inflationary pressure for a higher price level as the equilibrium changes from E 0 to E 1 to E 2 .

Visit this website to read about how inflation and unemployment are related.

Fighting recession or encouraging long-term growth?

Neoclassical economists believe that the economy will rebound out of a recession or eventually contract during an expansion because prices and wage rates are flexible and will adjust either upward or downward to restore the economy to its potential GDP. Thus, the key policy question for neoclassicals is how to promote growth of potential GDP. We know that economic growth ultimately depends on the growth rate of long-term productivity. Productivity measures how effective inputs are at producing outputs. We know that U.S. productivity has grown on average about 2% per year. That means that the same amount of inputs produce 2% more output than the year before. We also know that productivity growth varies a great deal in the short term due to cyclical factors. It also varies somewhat in the long term. From 1953–1972, U.S. labor productivity (as measured by output per hour in the business sector) grew at 3.2% per year. From 1973–1992, productivity growth declined significantly to 1.8% per year. Then, from 1993–2014, productivity growth increased slightly to 2% per year. The neoclassical economists believe the underpinnings of long-run productivity growth to be an economy’s investments in human capital, physical capital, and technology, operating together in a market-oriented environment that rewards innovation. Promotion of these factors is what government policy should focus on.

Summary of neoclassical macroeconomic policy recommendations

Let’s summarize what neoclassical economists recommend for macroeconomic policy. Neoclassical economists do not believe in “fine-tuning” the economy. They believe that economic growth is fostered by a stable economic environment with a low rate of inflation. Similarly, tax rates should be low and unchanging. In this environment, private economic agents can make the best possible investment decisions, which will lead to optimal investment in physical and human capital as well as research and development to promote improvements in technology.

Summary of neoclassical economics versus keynesian economics

[link] summarizes the key differences between the two schools of thought.

Neoclassical versus keynesian economics
Summary Neoclassical Economics Keynesian Economics
Focus: long-term or short term Long-term Short-term
Prices and wages: sticky or flexible? Flexible Sticky
Economic output: Primarily determined by aggregate demand or aggregate supply? Aggregate supply Aggregate demand
Aggregate supply: vertical or upward-sloping? Vertical Upward-sloping
Phillips curve vertical or downward-sloping Vertical Downward sloping
Is aggregate demand a useful tool for controlling inflation? Yes Yes
What should be the primary area of policy emphasis for reducing unemployment? Reform labor market institutions to reduce natural rate of unemployment Increase aggregate demand to eliminate cyclical unemployment
Is aggregate demand a useful tool for ending recession? At best, only in the short-run temporary sense, but may just increase inflation instead Yes

Key concepts and summary

Neoclassical economists tend to put relatively more emphasis on long-term growth than on fighting recession, because they believe that recessions will fade in a few years and long-term growth will ultimately determine the standard of living. They tend to focus more on reducing the natural rate of unemployment caused by economic institutions and government policies than the cyclical unemployment caused by recession.

Neoclassical economists also see no social benefit to inflation. With an upward-sloping Keynesian AS curve, inflation can arise because an economy is approaching full employment. With a vertical long-run neoclassical AS curve, inflation does not accompany any rise in output. If aggregate supply is vertical, then aggregate demand does not affect the quantity of output. Instead, aggregate demand can only cause inflationary changes in the price level. A vertical aggregate supply curve, where the quantity of output is consistent with many different price levels, also implies a vertical Phillips curve.

References

American Statistical Association. “ASA Headlines.” http://www.amstat.org/.

Haubrich, Joseph G., George Pennacchi, and Peter Ritchken. “Working Paper 11-07: Inflation Expectations, Real Rates, and Risk Premia: Evidence from Inflation Swaps.” Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland . Last modified March 2011. http://www.clevelandfed.org/research/workpaper/2011/wp1107.pdf.

University of Michigan: Institute for Social Research. “Survey Research Center.” http://www.src.isr.umich.edu/.

Questions & Answers

what is gdp per capital and why it is used for?
Era Reply
gross domestic product
prince
gdp per capita is the gross domestic product per person (GDP/population) and is a better indicator of economic health and living standards than GDP alone.
Gina
thank you so much 😘
Era
what is crowding out effect?
Sera Reply
What is SAT AND GPA
prince
What to read the introduction
prince Reply
Keynesian theory of employment
sainlangki Reply
it's about use of Fiscal policy.
yvonne
yar what actually means of APc. averge means?. can someone give a best example plz
Asrar Reply
APC is average propensity to consume n this refers to ratio of consumption expenditure to corresponding level of income
Vishakha
then it means both MPC and ApC are same ?
Asrar
No..... APC is average propensity to consume whereas MPC is marginal propensity to consume
Vishakha
APC=C/I , MPC=∆C/∆I
Vishakha
which model predicted a global collapse in the world's social and economic system before the year 2010
Francis Reply
trade deficit
Amadou
is trade deficit the correct answer?
Abinash
yes
Amadou
what is the formula of mixed income ?
Sanjum Reply
NDPfc = COE + OS +MI MI=NDPfc- COE- OS
Vishakha
labor force in.Nigeria is seen as .......?
Aisha Reply
Is demand the same as being in need of a product?
Aphiwe Reply
yeah
Demand is defer from only need of products
Zubairu
need is the primary and main root of demand. but demand is the result of combination of need; income capacity and desire to expend of money for that product.
Ramu
products or services
jax
what is price determination?
Alick Reply
why are imports subtructed when GDP is calculated in the expenditure approach
nati
what is fiscalpolicy
nati Reply
The way of the government expenses and other analysis
Zubairu
It explains government spending and how it helps to direct the economy towards the desired direction. For instance, if the govt of a nation is desirous of achieving economic growth and development, then the govt will adopt an expansionary fiscal policy which imply more spending by the govt.
Sunday
and politics party important
mujtaba Reply
politics party important
mujtaba
Which party is that
Zubairu
persons who stopped searching for jobs but would accept if the opportunity presents itself
Torissa Reply
persons who are unemployed whether they are underage, retired or incapacitated
Torissa
the us economy is best characterized as?
Shekeriah
what is the impact of fiscal policy in the short and long run in the AD/AS model...
Hydrammeh Reply
What is demand
Mohd Reply
Demand is the desire for a commodity backed by the willingness and the purchasing power too.
Ajay

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Source:  OpenStax, Macroeconomics. OpenStax CNX. Jun 16, 2014 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11626/1.10
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