Introduction to Psychology MCQ Exam 2010#2

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Psychology is the scientific study of mind and behavior. (credit "background": modification of work by Nattachai Noogure; credit "top left": modification of work by U.S. Navy; credit "top middle-left": modification of work by Peter Shanks; credit "top middle-right": modification of work by "devinf"/Flickr; credit "top right": modification of work by Alejandra Quintero Sinisterra; credit "bottom left": modification of work by Gabriel Rocha; credit "bottom middle-left": modification of work by Caleb Roenigk; credit "bottom middle-right": modification of work by Staffan Scherz; credit "bottom right": modification of work by Czech Provincial Reconstruction Team)

Clive Wearing is an accomplished musician who lost his ability to form new memories when he became sick at the age of 46. While he can remember how to play the piano perfectly, he cannot remember what he ate for breakfast just an hour ago (Sacks, 2007). James Wannerton experiences a taste sensation that is associated with the sound of words. His former girlfriend’s name tastes like rhubarb (Mundasad, 2013). John Nash is a brilliant mathematician and Nobel Prize winner. However, while he was a professor at MIT, he would tell people that the New York Times contained coded messages from extraterrestrial beings that were intended for him. He also began to hear voices and became suspicious of the people around him. Soon thereafter, Nash was diagnosed with schizophrenia and admitted to a state-run mental institution (O’Connor&Robertson, 2002). Nash was the subject of the 2001 movie A Beautiful Mind . Why did these people have these experiences? How does the human brain work? And what is the connection between the brain’s internal processes and people’s external behaviors? This textbook will introduce you to various ways that the field of psychology has explored these questions.

References

American Board of Forensic Psychology. (2014). Brochure . Retrieved from http://www.abfp.com/brochure.asp

American Psychological Association. (2014). Retrieved from www.apa.org

American Psychological Association. (2014). Graduate training and career possibilities in exercise and sport psychology. Retrieved from http://www.apadivisions.org/division-47/about/resources/training.aspx?item=1

American Psychological Association. (2011). Psychology as a career. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/education/undergrad/psych-career.aspx

Ashliman, D. L. (2001). Cupid and Psyche. In Folktexts: A library of folktales, folklore, fairy tales, and mythology. Retrieved from http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/cupid.html

Betancourt, H.,&López, S. R. (1993). The study of culture, ethnicity, and race in American psychology. American Psychologist , 48 , 629–637.

Black, S. R., Spence, S. A.,&Omari, S. R. (2004). Contributions of African Americans to the field of psychology. Journal of Black Studies , 35 , 40–64.

Bulfinch, T. (1855). The age of fable: Or, stories of gods and heroes . Boston, MA: Chase, Nichols and Hill.

Buss, D. M. (1989). Sex differences in human mate preferences: Evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences , 12 , 1–49.

This course is a survey of the scientific study of human nature, including how the mind works, and how the brain supports the mind. Topics include the mental and neural bases of perception, emotion, learning, memory, cognition, child development, personality, psychopathology, and social interaction. Students will consider how such knowledge relates to debates about nature and nurture, free will, consciousness, human differences, self, and society.
Exam PDF eBook: 
Introduction to Psychology MCQ Exam 2010#2
Download Psychology 2010 #2 Exam PDF eBook
50 Pages
2014
English US
Educational Materials



Sample Questions from the Introduction to Psychology MCQ Exam 2010#2 Exam

Question: People incorrectly (a) often think that it is unlikely that two individuals among 30 people will share a birthday; (b) often think that more words begin with the letter "K" than have "K" in the third letter position; and (c) often estimate that the Mississippi River is shorter if they first answer if it is longer or shorter than 500 miles than if they first answer if it is longer or shorter than 5000 miles. These ways of thinking reflect, in order, what heuristics?

Choices:

(a) framing; (b) anchoring; (c) availability

(a) representativeness; (b) framing; (c) availability

(a) representativeness; (b) availability; (c) anchoring

(a) availability; (b) representativeness; (c) anchoring

Question: Patients with right or left hemisphere lesions were compared to healthy control subjects in their abilities to interpret (identify) people who are lying through facial expressions alone or through facial expressions and vocal cues. What was found?

Choices:

Patients with either left or right hemisphere lesions were more accurate than controls

Patients with right hemisphere lesions were more accurate than patients with left hemisphere lesions and healthy people.

Patients with left hemisphere lesions were more accurate than patients with right hemisphere lesions and healthy people.

Patients with right hemisphere lesions were as accurate as controls and more accurate than patients with left hemisphere lesions.

Question: Flash-bulb memories refer to memories for emotionally important events for which people feel that the memory is so vivid that it is like a picture. What is NOT true about flash-bulb memories according to research?

Choices:

One is more likely to remember such an emotionally powerful event than a typical event

Flash-bulb memories are susceptible to distortion

People are exceptionally accurate in assessing the accuracy of their flush-bulb memories

Flash-bulb memories relate both to external perceptions and internal feelings

Question: A patient with a right-sided removal of the hippocampus would be impaired on which of the following:

Choices:

short-term verbal memory

long-term verbal memory

short-term visuo-spatial memory

long-term visuo-spatial memory

Question: The number of chunks that can be held in short-term memory is typically conceptualized as

Choices:

9 plus or minus 2

7 plus or minus 2

5 plus or minus 2

3 plus or minus 2

Question: Monkeys with surgical removals of the hippocampal region have

Choices:

No retrograde amnesia at all

Temporally limited retrograde amnesia for material learned in the more distant past

Temporally limited retrograde amnesia for material learned in the more recent past

Complete retrograde amnesia

Question: Experimental studies show that, for equal losses or gains, people are

Choices:

risk averse for losses and gains

risk taking for losses and gains

risk taking for gains and risk averse for losses

risk averse for gains and risk taking for losses

Question: Which is NOT true about human phonology?

Choices:

Humans use about 100 phonemes

English has about 45 phonemes

children are born with the capacity to discriminate all phonemes, but start to lose the ability to discriminate phonemes they do not hear after about 12 months

pauses during natural speech generally occur at the ends of words

Question: Various factors can help or harm memory. People remember material, like recall of nonsense syllables, better if they sleep 8 hours between study and test than if they are awake for 8 hours between study and test; this result supports the idea of __________. People mix up information when later asked about an event with information from the event itself; this is known as __________. People also remember things better when they study and are tested in the same location as opposed to different locations, which demonstrates _______.

Choices:

proactive interference; retroactive interference; proactive interference

proactive interference; proactive interference; encoding specificity

retroactive interference; retroactive interference; encoding specificity

retroactive interference; proactive interference; encoding specificity

Question: Declarative memory depends on the _______; repetition priming depends on the _____; procedural memory depends on ______.

Choices:

hippocampus; neocortex; basal ganglia

hippocampus; basal ganglia; neocortex

neocortex; basal ganglia; hippocampus

basal ganglia; neocortex; hippocampus

Question: Experimental evidence indicates which of the following about lexical access?

Choices:

all meanings of words are activated for about 500 msec through 2000 msec

all meanings of words are activated for about 500 msec, and then only the relevant meaning is activated at 2000 msec

only relevant meanings of words are activated for about 500 msec through 2000 msec

only relevant meanings of words are activated for about 500 msec, and then all meanings are activated at 2000 msec

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Source:  Gabrieli, John. 9.00 Introduction to Psychology, Spring 2010. (MIT OpenCourseWare: Massachusetts Institute of Technology), http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/brain-and-cognitive-sciences/9-00sc-introduction-to-psychology-fall-2011 (Accessed 2 Mar, 2014). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
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