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By the end of this section, you will be able to:
  • Identify periods of economic growth and recession using the aggregate demand/aggregate supply model
  • Explain how unemployment and inflation impact the aggregate demand/aggregate supply model
  • Evaluate the importance of the aggregate demand/aggregate supply model

The AD/AS model can convey a number of interlocking relationships between the four macroeconomic goals of growth, unemployment , inflation    , and a sustainable balance of trade. Moreover, the AD/AS framework is flexible enough to accommodate both the Keynes’ law approach that focuses on aggregate demand and the short run, while also including the Say’s law approach that focuses on aggregate supply and the long run. These advantages are considerable. Every model is a simplified version of the deeper reality and, in the context of the AD/AS model, the three macroeconomic goals arise in ways that are sometimes indirect or incomplete. In this module, we consider how the AD/AS model illustrates the three macroeconomic goals of economic growth, low unemployment, and low inflation.

Growth and recession in the ad/as diagram

In the AD/AS diagram, long-run economic growth due to productivity increases over time will be represented by a gradual shift to the right of aggregate supply. The vertical line representing potential GDP (or the “full employment level of GDP”) will gradually shift to the right over time as well. A pattern of economic growth over three years, with the AS curve shifting slightly out to the right each year, was shown earlier in [link] (a). However, the factors that determine the speed of this long-term economic growth rate—like investment in physical and human capital, technology, and whether an economy can take advantage of catch-up growth—do not appear directly in the AD/AS diagram.

In the short run, GDP falls and rises in every economy, as the economy dips into recession or expands out of recession. Recessions are illustrated in the AD/AS diagram when the equilibrium level of real GDP is substantially below potential GDP, as occurred at the equilibrium point E 0 in [link] . On the other hand, in years of resurgent economic growth the equilibrium will typically be close to potential GDP, as shown at equilibrium point E 1 in that earlier figure.

Unemployment in the ad/as diagram

Two types of unemployment were described in the Unemployment chapter. Cyclical unemployment bounces up and down according to the short-run movements of GDP. Over the long run, in the United States, the unemployment rate typically hovers around 5% (give or take one percentage point or so), when the economy is healthy. In many of the national economies across Europe, the rate of unemployment in recent decades has only dropped to about 10% or a bit lower, even in good economic years. This baseline level of unemployment that occurs year-in and year-out is called the natural rate of unemployment    and is determined by how well the structures of market and government institutions in the economy lead to a matching of workers and employers in the labor market. Potential GDP can imply different unemployment rates in different economies, depending on the natural rate of unemployment for that economy.

Questions & Answers

what is economic
Vida Reply
Economic is a seines which study the human behavior as ends and scarce means which have alternative uses
Debrah
Economics is the study of how human make decisions in the face of scarcity. These can be individual decisions, family decisions, business decisions or societal decisions.
Wandji
what is special directives
Emmanuel Reply
what is demand
Joseph Reply
Demand simply refers to the amount of goods and services which the consumer is willing and able to purchase at each price
Owusu
what is mean by unitary elastic demand
Bangniyel Reply
demand is said to be unitary elastic when the percentage change in the demand is equal to the percentage change in the price
George
what is the principle of equi-marginal utility
Reliance Reply
what is Economics and it important
Anita Reply
what is production
Anita
what is Economic
Anita Reply
what is the meaning of Economic
Anita
economics is a science which studies human behaviour as a relationship between ends and scarce means which have alternative uses
Boso
I don't know.
natchanan
u don't
Ssali
@ Boso thanks for the definition ✌
Raewyn
boso u r too much u try
Liambee
ya nyc
Ssali
Thanks kk
Anita
pls can I ask more questions
Anita
what is production
Anita
production is creation of goods and services
George
what is macroeconomics and microeconomics
Anita
macroeconomics deals with larger economic units such as GDP,GNP,employment while microeconomics deals with smaller economic units such firm and household
George
Thanks
Anita
Explain the ff Scarcity Ends Demand Supply Choice Scale of preference
Anita
macroeconomics deals with larger economic units such as GDP,GNP,employment while microeconomics deals with smaller economic units such firm and household
George
Gross Domestic product...it represent the total value of the products produced within the country including foreign industries
George Reply
what is products
Anita
what are the favourable demand
Odia Reply
list of climate that affect demands
Odia
What is two major forms of international trade?
Musa Reply
What is Economics and why it is important
Abdul Reply
De ans,Economics is the study of women behavior as a relationship between end and scared mean which have alternative uses.
Anita
What is Inflation
Abdul Reply
More money = more consumers, more consumers = lessen the product, less product = high price, high price = inflation
TuroN
is it definition
Odia
why price and quantity increase
Otuu Reply
condition under which price and quantity will be increased at the same time
Otuu
factors that hinders mobility of labour
Dennis Reply
what is scarcity
Adams Reply

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Source:  OpenStax, Principles of economics. OpenStax CNX. Sep 19, 2014 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11613/1.11
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