<< Chapter < Page Chapter >> Page >

By the end of this section, you will be able to:

  • Analyze whether monetary policy decisions should be made more democratically
  • Calculate the velocity of money
  • Evaluate the central bank’s influence on inflation, unemployment, asset bubbles, and leverage cycles
  • Calculate the effects of monetary stimulus

In the real world, effective monetary policy faces a number of significant hurdles. Monetary policy affects the economy only after a time lag that is typically long and of variable length. Remember, monetary policy involves a chain of events: the central bank    must perceive a situation in the economy, hold a meeting, and make a decision to react by tightening or loosening monetary policy. The change in monetary policy must percolate through the banking system, changing the quantity of loans and affecting interest rates. When interest rates change, businesses must change their investment levels and consumers must change their borrowing patterns when purchasing homes or cars. Then it takes time for these changes to filter through the rest of the economy.

As a result of this chain of events, monetary policy has little effect in the immediate future; instead, its primary effects are felt perhaps one to three years in the future. The reality of long and variable time lags does not mean that a central bank should refuse to make decisions. It does mean that central banks should be humble about taking action, because of the risk that their actions can create as much or more economic instability as they resolve.

Excess reserves

Banks are legally required to hold a minimum level of reserves, but no rule prohibits them from holding additional excess reserves    above the legally mandated limit. For example, during a recession banks may be hesitant to lend, because they fear that when the economy is contracting, a high proportion of loan applicants become less likely to repay their loans.

When many banks are choosing to hold excess reserves, expansionary monetary policy may not work well. This may occur because the banks are concerned about a deteriorating economy, while the central bank is trying to expand the money supply. If the banks prefer to hold excess reserves above the legally required level, the central bank cannot force individual banks to make loans. Similarly, sensible businesses and consumers may be reluctant to borrow substantial amounts of money in a recession    , because they recognize that firms’ sales and employees’ jobs are more insecure in a recession, and they do not want to face the need to make interest payments. The result is that during an especially deep recession, an expansionary monetary policy may have little effect on either the price level or the real GDP    .

Japan experienced this situation in the 1990s and early 2000s. Japan’s economy entered a period of very slow growth, dipping in and out of recession, in the early 1990s. By February 1999, the Bank of Japan had lowered the equivalent of its federal funds rate to 0%. It kept it there most of the time through 2003. Moreover, in the two years from March 2001 to March 2003, the Bank of Japan also expanded the money supply of the country by about 50%—an enormous increase. Even this highly expansionary monetary policy, however, had no substantial effect on stimulating aggregate demand. Japan’s economy continued to experience extremely slow growth into the mid-2000s.

Questions & Answers

been unemployed mean s u don't have work whilst been out of labour for means you are not in age of working or you are above the working age (aged)
roy Reply
no, only the working age
roy
Please briefly explain the relationship between the scarcity, choice and opportunity costs
Thandokazi Reply
What is the effect of raising in price to revenue
Michael Reply
What are the types of price elasticity of supply
jamilu Reply
What's are the types of elasticity
jamilu
what is effect of riaising in price to revenue
Shiyghan Reply
consumer consumption will reduce, as well as demand will fall.
kuntu
what cause inflation
Foday Reply
expenditure on capital goods by the business is known as?
rhandzu Reply
ok
Shiyghan
good morning
Shiyghan
am new in dis hse
Shiyghan
capital expenditure
Zulkiful
fundamental of ecnomics
joseph Reply
sure
Amadou
fu fundamentals of economic problems
Suzan Reply
what are the examples of price elasticity of supply
violet Reply
elastic, inelastic, unitary
joseph
Evaluate the impact of corona virus on the economy of china
Kelvin Reply
lose of global market unemployment Expenses low export
Bangi
The similarities and difference between the definition of prof Lionel Robbins and prof Paul ; A; Samuel son, each 5 definition
prince Reply
What are the basic concepts of economic
Taye Reply
what ment for production
Foday
With the aid of appropriate diagram differentiate between change in demand
Jones Reply
explain demand
Alaka Reply
Demand is a quantity of goods and services a consumer is willing to buy at given price in a period of time.
Aliado
who break in bulk
Alaka

Get the best Principles of economics course in your pocket!





Source:  OpenStax, Principles of economics. OpenStax CNX. Sep 19, 2014 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11613/1.11
Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc.

Notification Switch

Would you like to follow the 'Principles of economics' conversation and receive update notifications?

Ask