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Inflation around the world

Around the rest of the world, the pattern of inflation has been very mixed, as can be seen in [link] which shows inflation rates over the last several decades. Many industrialized countries, not just the United States, had relatively high inflation rates in the 1970s. For example, in 1975, Japan’s inflation rate was over 8% and the inflation rate for the United Kingdom was almost 25%. In the 1980s, inflation rates came down in the United States and in Europe and have largely stayed down.

Countries with relatively low inflation rates, 1960–2014

The graph shows that the United States, Japan, Germany, and the United Kingdom all had periods of high inflation in the 1970s and early 1980s, though Germany did not have nearly the high rates of inflation as seen in the other countries. Since the early 1990s, all four countries have had inflation rates below 5%, with Japan’s rate consistently lower than those of Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States. However, the graph also shows that, as of 2014, Japan had the highest inflation rate of the four.
This chart shows the annual percentage change in consumer prices compared with the previous year’s consumer prices in the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, and Germany.

Countries with controlled economies in the 1970s, like the Soviet Union and China, historically had very low rates of measured inflation—because prices were forbidden to rise by law, except for the cases where the government deemed a price increase to be due to quality improvements. However, these countries also had perpetual shortages of goods, since forbidding prices to rise acts like a price ceiling and creates a situation where quantity demanded often exceeds quantity supplied. As Russia and China made a transition toward more market-oriented economies, they also experienced outbursts of inflation, although the statistics for these economies should be regarded as somewhat shakier. Inflation in China averaged about 10% per year for much of the 1980s and early 1990s, although it has dropped off since then. Russia experienced hyperinflation    —an outburst of high inflation—of 2,500% per year in the early 1990s, although by 2006 Russia’s consumer price inflation had dipped below 10% per year, as shown in [link] . The closest the United States has ever gotten to hyperinflation was during the Civil War, 1860–1865, in the Confederate states.

Countries with relatively high inflation rates, 1980–2013

The first graph shows that Brazil had an extremely high inflation rate, over 2000%, in 1990. The second graph, which is on a smaller scale, shows that Russia had a spike in its inflation rate in the late 1990s. Though Russia's rates have all been lower over the last decade, they are still relatively high rates.
These charts show the percentage change in consumer prices compared with the previous year’s consumer prices in Brazil, China, and Russia. (a) Of these, Brazil and Russia experienced hyperinflation at some point between the mid-1980s and mid-1990s. (b) Though not as high, China and Nigeria also had high inflation rates in the mid-1990s. Even though their inflation rates have come down over the last two decades, several of these countries continue to see significant inflation rates. (Sources: http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/FPCPITOTLZGBRA; http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/CHNCPIALLMINMEI; http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/FPCPITOTLZGRUS)

Many countries in Latin America experienced raging hyperinflation during the 1980s and early 1990s, with inflation rates often well above 100% per year. In 1990, for example, both Brazil and Argentina saw inflation climb above 2000%. Certain countries in Africa experienced extremely high rates of inflation, sometimes bordering on hyperinflation, in the 1990s. Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, had an inflation rate of 75% in 1995.

In the early 2000s, the problem of inflation appears to have diminished for most countries, at least in comparison to the worst times of recent decades. As we noted in this earlier Bring it Home feature, in recent years, the world’s worst example of hyperinflation was in Zimbabwe, where at one point the government was issuing bills with a face value of $100 trillion (in Zimbabwean dollars)—that is, the bills had $100,000,000,000,000 written on the front, but were almost worthless. In many countries, the memory of double-digit, triple-digit, and even quadruple-digit inflation is not very far in the past.

Key concepts and summary

In the U.S. economy, the annual inflation rate in the last two decades has typically been around 2% to 4%. The periods of highest inflation in the United States in the twentieth century occurred during the years after World Wars I and II, and in the 1970s. The period of lowest inflation—actually, with deflation—was the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Problems

Within 1 or 2 percentage points, what has the U.S. inflation rate been during the last 20 years? Draw a graph to show the data.

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Questions & Answers

what were the events during the great depression that made classical economy tenets ineffective
Alby Reply
please what is the answer for the following question; derive the expression for a two sector Keynesian model from sowotuom land economy and state all the two components in the expression.
Alby Reply
No idea
ahmad
meaning nature and scope of macroeconomics
Diksha Reply
meaning of macroeconomics
Diksha
meaning of macroeconomics
Diksha
meaning of macroeconomics
Diksha
Macroeconomics covers aggregate or in simple words overall economy of country or world while microeconomics was just concerned with individual economies
Hamza
Hope this helped you, you can search it more on Google there is a YouTube page by the name of jacob Clifford
Hamza
How aggregate demand and output gap are related explain in the light of keynesian cross diagram
Muhammad Reply
what are the jobs of an economist
Shadrach Reply
study and predict economic indicators. give a economic base for polictical decision
mike
using the aggregate supply - aggregate demand model , explain how out and prices are determined , will out vary or stay fix in long run ?
SHAKEEL Reply
can you explain please
Tadesse
explain me too
Frank
The long-run aggregate supply curve is a vertical line at the potential level of output. The intersection of the economy’s aggregate demand and long-run aggregate supply curves determines its equilibrium real GDP and price level in the long run. Am I correct?
Tadesse
so it will out vary
Tadesse
no one corrects me
Tadesse
yes no-one corrects you.
Frank
but I'm here to listen your answer
Frank
aggregate supply is total of all industry supply.
Frank
In the long-run, the aggregate supply is graphed vertically on the supply curve. The equation used to determine the long-run aggregate supply is: Y = Y*. In the equation, Y is the production of the economy and Y* is the natural level of production of the economy.
Frank
yes you're correct Mr. Tedessa
Frank
What's a slope?
Tatiana Reply
change
Frank
rate of change,
Frank
😀😀 always happy. ....
Manjeck
interaction of demand and supply
Raka Reply
not know
Narayandutt
aggregate demand ko aur kin namo se Jana jata hai
Narayandutt Reply
aggregate demand ko kin namo se Jana jata
Narayandutt
Discuss briefly, the circular flow of income in a two-sector economy.
Kweku Reply
WHY DEVELOP COUNTRIES RELY ON DEVELOPED COUNTRIES?
Ben Reply
that is choice and want....
DJ
what is the determination of aggregate demand?
Maddy Reply
C+I consumption + investment
Rohit
AD= C+I+G+(X-M)
Rana
classical dichotomy and its components?
Romaisa Reply
what will happen to the demand curve when there is an inflation in an economy
Hamza Reply
From my view, I think the demand curve will shift inwards.
Bobo
now it depends on what kind of inflation it is, depending on the type of inflation the movement of the demand curve can be stated.
Munimu
yes it depends on the cause for inflation. if it caused by maybe an increase in money supply, the effect is neutral in the long term, therefore there are no effects on total output in the economy, except for an increase in price
Lucas
but short term in general i think you could expect the demand curve to shift inwards as consumers experience a decrease in real income
Lucas
source of capital for the sole trader
Dogbey Reply
borrowing from relatives, government grants, bank loans, personal savings, credit card etc.
Munimu

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Source:  OpenStax, Macroeconomics. OpenStax CNX. Jun 16, 2014 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11626/1.10
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