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After seroconversion, the amount of virus circulating in the blood drops and stays at a low level for several years. During this time, the levels of CD4 + cells, especially helper T cells, decline steadily, until at some point, the immune response is so weak that opportunistic disease and eventually death result. CD4 is the receptor that HIV uses to get inside T cells and reproduce. Given that CD4 + helper T cells play an important role in other in T cell immune responses and antibody responses, it should be no surprise that both types of immune responses are eventually seriously compromised.

Treatment for the disease consists of drugs that target virally encoded proteins that are necessary for viral replication but are absent from normal human cells. By targeting the virus itself and sparing the cells, this approach has been successful in significantly prolonging the lives of HIV-positive individuals. On the other hand, an HIV vaccine has been 30 years in development and is still years away. Because the virus mutates rapidly to evade the immune system, scientists have been looking for parts of the virus that do not change and thus would be good targets for a vaccine candidate.

Hypersensitivities

The word “hypersensitivity” simply means sensitive beyond normal levels of activation. Allergies and inflammatory responses to nonpathogenic environmental substances have been observed since the dawn of history. Hypersensitivity is a medical term describing symptoms that are now known to be caused by unrelated mechanisms of immunity. Still, it is useful for this discussion to use the four types of hypersensitivities as a guide to understand these mechanisms ( [link] ).

Immune hypersensitivity

This table describes different types of hypersensitivity. In Type I (IgE-Mediated Hypersensitivity), IgE is bound to mast cells via its Fc portion. When an allergen binds to these antibodies, crosslinking of IgE induces degranulation. Type I causes localized and systemic anaphylaxis, seasonal allergies including hay fever, food allergies such as those to shellfish and peanuts, hives, and eczema. In Type II (IgG-Mediated Hypersensitivity), cells are destroyed by bound antibody, either by activation of complement or by a cytotoxic T cell with an Fc receptor for the antibody (ADCC). Examples are when red blood cells are destroyed by complement and antibody during a transfusion of mismatched blood types or during erythroblastosis fetalis. In Type III (Immune Complex-Mediated Hypersensitivity), antigen-antibody complexes are deposited in tissues, causing activation of complement, which attracts neutrophils to the site. Most common forms of immune complex disease are seen in glomerulonephritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. In Type IV (Cell-Mediated Hypersensitivity), Th1 cells secrete cytokines, which activate macrophages and cytotoxic T cells and can cause macrophage accumulation at the site. Most common forms are contact dermatitis, tuberculin reaction, and autoimmune diseases such as diabetes mellitus type I, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis.
Components of the immune system cause four types of hypersensitivity. Notice that types I–III are B cell mediated, whereas type IV hypersensitivity is exclusively a T cell phenomenon.

Immediate (type i) hypersensitivity

Antigens that cause allergic responses are often referred to as allergens. The specificity of the immediate hypersensitivity    response is predicated on the binding of allergen-specific IgE to the mast cell surface. The process of producing allergen-specific IgE is called sensitization, and is a necessary prerequisite for the symptoms of immediate hypersensitivity to occur. Allergies and allergic asthma are mediated by mast cell degranulation that is caused by the crosslinking of the antigen-specific IgE molecules on the mast cell surface. The mediators released have various vasoactive effects already discussed, but the major symptoms of inhaled allergens are the nasal edema and runny nose caused by the increased vascular permeability and increased blood flow of nasal blood vessels. As these mediators are released with mast cell degranulation, type I hypersensitivity    reactions are usually rapid and occur within just a few minutes, hence the term immediate hypersensitivity.

Most allergens are in themselves nonpathogenic and therefore innocuous. Some individuals develop mild allergies, which are usually treated with antihistamines. Others develop severe allergies that may cause anaphylactic shock, which can potentially be fatal within 20 to 30 minutes if untreated. This drop in blood pressure (shock) with accompanying contractions of bronchial smooth muscle is caused by systemic mast cell degranulation when an allergen is eaten (for example, shellfish and peanuts), injected (by a bee sting or being administered penicillin), or inhaled (asthma). Because epinephrine raises blood pressure and relaxes bronchial smooth muscle, it is routinely used to counteract the effects of anaphylaxis and can be lifesaving. Patients with known severe allergies are encouraged to keep automatic epinephrine injectors with them at all times, especially when away from easy access to hospitals.

Questions & Answers

describe the urine formation
Sarah Reply
Body water
Kashif
the urine formation is described as the wrist fluid that comes out of body
Hellen
glomerular filtration, reabsorption, secretion.
Maria
nice
Hussain
good Hellen kehn
Dr
is it wast fluids or wrist?
Baldwin
what is single cell
Jimmy Reply
A unicellular organism, also known as a single-celled organism, is an organism that consists of a single cell, unlike a multicellular organism that consists of multiple cells. ... Many eukaryotes are multicellular, but many are unicellular such as protozoa, unicellular algae, and unicellular fungi.
Noor
Why is important to check if the blood if compatible before transfusion ?
Kelvin Reply
to avoid cases of intravenous clupping in blood which can be fatal....bcos blood is incopartable
John
Thank you.good answer
Kelvin
what are the clinical significant of thyroid gland
Jennifer Reply
what is a metabolism?
Kheth Reply
Metabolism is the sum total of all the chemical processes in the body. It is divided into an anabolic(building up) and catabolic(breaking down) metabolism)
Jonas
Oh ok
King
sir what is constructive and destructive metabolism
Soul
is anyone
Soul
Describe the system s that maintain the internal environment of a human body
Nora Reply
an organism is a living being that had a cellular structure and that can independently perform all physiological functions needed for life.
Nwecho Reply
a tissue is a group of similar cells that work together to perform a particular function
Nwecho
chemical level, cellular level, tissue level, organs level, organ systems, organisms
Nwecho Reply
they're reproduction but also produces hormones dus they're endocrine system
Nwecho
cells are smallest independent functional unit of a living organism
Nwecho
an organ is an anatomically distinct structure of the body composed of two or more tissue
Nwecho
an organ system is a group of organs that work together to perform a major function.
Nwecho
Structural Organization of the human body.
Tammy
What is a cavity
Isaac Reply
Permanently damaged areas in teeth that develop into tiny holes
MASLAH
what is meant by epithelial tissue
Zahid
What is the difference between regional anatomy and systematic anatomy?
Andrew Reply
Regional anatomy is the study of the interrelationships of all of the structures in a specific body region, such as the abdomen. ... In contrast, systemic anatomy is the study of the structures that make up a discrete body system—that is, a group of structures that work together to perform a unique
Tammy
Pls is that all
Petra
regional anatomy studies structures that contribute to specific body region example the thoracic region while systematic anatomy studies structures that contribute to specific body systems example respiratory system
Nwecho
so meaning of dissect
Mary Reply
it is the dismembering or the cutting of living organism to study the anatomical structure of it body
Kwasi
what are lymph nodes
Memory Reply
what is the best book that shows unit 1 about cell unit 2 about tissue unit 3 about embroyology
Abraham Reply
2
Hellen
to understand structure of body able to understand function of system. to understand how to build human body and function
Dereje Reply
hi
Neela
to determine body structures
Petra Reply
to know the use of each and every part of our body
Petra
to understand how our body structures work to support our lives
Petra
Is this a question?
Tammy
So what was the question?
Thamie
All the body work together to make the whole organism life possible
Kwasi
what is the importance of conversation
Hellen
To be able to identify the parts of the body and their functions
Hodasi
ok
Hodasi
Ideas are shared during conversation also informations are given
Hodasi
it reduces cost
Kwasi

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Source:  OpenStax, Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 04, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11496/1.8
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