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When thinking about the demand for domestically produced goods in a global economy, it is important to count spending on exports—domestically produced goods that are sold abroad. By the same token, we must also subtract spending on imports—goods produced in other countries that are purchased by residents of this country. The net export component of GDP is equal to the dollar value of exports (X) minus the dollar value of imports (M), (X – M). The gap between exports and imports is called the trade balance    . If a country’s exports are larger than its imports, then a country is said to have a trade surplus    . In the United States, exports typically exceeded imports in the 1960s and 1970s, as shown in [link] (b).

Since the early 1980s, imports have typically exceeded exports, and so the United States has experienced a trade deficit    in most years. Indeed, the trade deficit grew quite large in the late 1990s and in the mid-2000s. [link] (b) also shows that imports and exports have both risen substantially in recent decades, even after the declines during the Great Recession between 2008 and 2009. As noted before, if exports and imports are equal, foreign trade has no effect on total GDP. However, even if exports and imports are balanced overall, foreign trade might still have powerful effects on particular industries and workers by causing nations to shift workers and physical capital investment toward one industry rather than another.

Based on these four components of demand, GDP can be measured as:

GDP  =  Consumption + Investment + Government + Trade balance GDP  =  C + I + G + (X – M)

Understanding how to measure GDP is important for analyzing connections in the macro economy and for thinking about macroeconomic policy tools.

Gdp measured by what is produced

Everything that is purchased must be produced first. [link] breaks down what is produced into five categories: durable goods , nondurable goods , services , structures , and the change in inventories . Before going into detail about these categories, notice that total GDP measured according to what is produced is exactly the same as the GDP measured by looking at the five components of demand. [link] provides a visual representation of this information.

(Source: http://bea.gov/iTable/index_nipa.cfm)
Components of u.s. gdp on the production side, 2014
Components of GDP on the Supply Side (in trillions of dollars) Percentage of Total
Goods
Durable goods $2.9 16.7%
Nondurable goods $2.3 13.2%
Services $10.8 62.1%
Structures $1.3 7.4%
Change in inventories $0.1 0.6%
Total GDP $17.4 100%

Percentage of components of gdp on the production side

The pie chart shows that services take up almost half of the chart, followed by durable goods, nondurable goods, structures, and change in inventories.
Services make up over half of the production side components of GDP in the United States.

Since every market transaction must have both a buyer and a seller, GDP must be the same whether measured by what is demanded or by what is produced. [link] shows these components of what is produced, expressed as a percentage of GDP, since 1960.

Types of production

The graph shows that since 1960, structures have mostly remained around 10%, but dipped to 7.7% in 2014, and durable goods have mostly remained around 20%, but dipped in 2014 to 16.8%. The graph also shows that services have steadily increased from less than 30% in 1960 to over 61.9%  in 2014. In contrast, nondurable goods have steadily decreased from roughly 40% in 1960 to around 13.7% in 2014.
Services are the largest single component of total supply, representing over half of GDP. Nondurable goods used to be larger than durable goods, but in recent years, nondurable goods have been dropping closer to durable goods, which is about 20% of GDP. Structures hover around 10% of GDP. The change in inventories, the final component of aggregate supply, is not shown here; it is typically less than 1% of GDP.

Questions & Answers

what is distribution
umar Reply
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umar
what is demand
Obianyido Reply
The market for you In Ilorin has the following demand and supply equation Qd + 5p =9520 Qs =2.5p - 125 a) determine the equation price and quantity b) Explain the situation when the market price is below the equlibrum price
Rasheee Reply
What is scale of preference
Richmond Reply
Pls what is scale of preference
Richmond
scale of preference is a arrangement of individual wants in order of priority
Lamina
the arrangement of people want inoder of demand
Ada
explain whether decisions in microeconomics involve an opportunity cost
Sonali Reply
What is primary activity
Yeboah Reply
indigenization is the dominance or influence of people native in a particular place or
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Enoch Reply
fine
Ifeanyi
first
Ifeanyi
What is economics?
Penuel Reply
economics is a social science which studies of human behaviour as a relationship between end and scores which have antanetuve use
IDRIS
economics is the study of complicated tables and chart, statistics and numbers but more specifically it is the study of what constitute human rational behavior in endeavor to fulfill human needs and want
Rosemary
what are the five laws of demand
Uleme Reply
the ppc curve slopes down due to Central problem of economy.......
SHADAB
what is economic by James Stewart
Emma
what is economic
Okechukwu Reply
Economics is a science of wealth
Taur
hi
scor
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scor
economic is science and arts both........
SHADAB
to me is a science which study human behavior as a relationship between ends and scare which have alternative use
Ada
economic is a science which study human and environment
Akor
Explain any five limitation to division of labour
Aliyu Reply
production
Abddeeyat
size of the market. for example..let's take a look at a barbing saloon. the number of hands needed there isnt up to the one needed in a company or production line because the number of people the barbing saloon is serving cant be up to the ones of the company
Abisola
Answer: The four basic problems of an economy, which arise from the central problem of scarcity of resources are: What to produce?How to produce?For whom to produce?What provisions (if any) are to be made for economic growth?
Yusuf Reply
what is the basic economic problem
Arnold Reply
what is the basic problem
Arnold
importance of elasticity of demand
Ayuk Reply
what nature is price elasticity
Ayuk
nature of price elasticity
Ayuk
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Arnold
Answer: The four basic problems of an economy, which arise from the central problem of scarcity of resources are: What to produce?How to produce?For whom to produce?What provisions (if any) are to be made for economic growth?
Yusuf
All teachers economic development
HASSAN
what is macro economics
ROGATH Reply

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Source:  OpenStax, Principles of economics. OpenStax CNX. Sep 19, 2014 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11613/1.11
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