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Allergies

The immune reaction that results from immediate hypersensitivities in which an antibody-mediated immune response occurs within minutes of exposure to a harmless antigen is called an allergy    . In the United States, 20 percent of the population exhibits symptoms of allergy or asthma, whereas 55 percent test positive against one or more allergens. Upon initial exposure to a potential allergen, an allergic individual synthesizes antibodies of the IgE class via the typical process of APCs presenting processed antigen to T H cells that stimulate B cells to produce IgE. This class of antibodies also mediates the immune response to parasitic worms. The constant domain of the IgE molecules interact with mast cells embedded in connective tissues. This process primes, or sensitizes, the tissue. Upon subsequent exposure to the same allergen, IgE molecules on mast cells bind the antigen via their variable domains and stimulate the mast cell to release the modified amino acids histamine and serotonin; these chemical mediators then recruit eosinophils which mediate allergic responses. [link] shows an example of an allergic response to ragweed pollen. The effects of an allergic reaction range from mild symptoms like sneezing and itchy, watery eyes to more severe or even life-threatening reactions involving intensely itchy welts or hives, airway contraction with severe respiratory distress, and plummeting blood pressure. This extreme reaction is known as anaphylactic shock. If not treated with epinephrine to counter the blood pressure and breathing effects, this condition can be fatal.

Illustration shows ragweed pollen attached to the surface of a B cell. The B cell is activated, producing plasma cells that release IgE. The IgE is presented on the surface of a mast cell. Upon a second exposure, binding of the antigen to the IgE-primed mast cells causes the release of chemical mediators that elicit an allergic reaction.
On first exposure to an allergen, an IgE antibody is synthesized by plasma cells in response to a harmless antigen. The IgE molecules bind to mast cells, and on secondary exposure, the mast cells release histamines and other modulators that affect the symptoms of allergy. (credit: modification of work by NIH)

Delayed hypersensitivity is a cell-mediated immune response that takes approximately one to two days after secondary exposure for a maximal reaction to be observed. This type of hypersensitivity involves the T H 1 cytokine-mediated inflammatory response and may manifest as local tissue lesions or contact dermatitis (rash or skin irritation). Delayed hypersensitivity occurs in some individuals in response to contact with certain types of jewelry or cosmetics. Delayed hypersensitivity facilitates the immune response to poison ivy and is also the reason why the skin test for tuberculosis results in a small region of inflammation on individuals who were previously exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis . That is also why cortisone is used to treat such responses: it will inhibit cytokine production.

Autoimmunity

Autoimmunity is a type of hypersensitivity to self antigens that affects approximately five percent of the population. Most types of autoimmunity involve the humoral immune response. Antibodies that inappropriately mark self components as foreign are termed autoantibodies . In patients with the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis, muscle cell receptors that induce contraction in response to acetylcholine are targeted by antibodies. The result is muscle weakness that may include marked difficultly with fine and/or gross motor functions. In systemic lupus erythematosus, a diffuse autoantibody response to the individual’s own DNA and proteins results in various systemic diseases. As illustrated in [link] , systemic lupus erythematosus may affect the heart, joints, lungs, skin, kidneys, central nervous system, or other tissues, causing tissue damage via antibody binding, complement recruitment, lysis, and inflammation.

Illustration shows the symptoms of lupus, which include a face rash, ulcers in the mouth and nose, inflammation of the pericardium and poor circulation in the fingers and toes.
Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by autoimmunity to the individual’s own DNA and/or proteins, which leads to varied dysfunction of the organs. (credit: modification of work by Mikael Häggström)

Autoimmunity can develop with time, and its causes may be rooted in molecular mimicry. Antibodies and TCRs may bind self antigens that are structurally similar to pathogen antigens, which the immune receptors first raised. As an example, infection with Streptococcus pyogenes (bacterium that causes strep throat) may generate antibodies or T cells that react with heart muscle, which has a similar structure to the surface of S. pyogenes . These antibodies can damage heart muscle with autoimmune attacks, leading to rheumatic fever. Insulin-dependent (Type 1) diabetes mellitus arises from a destructive inflammatory T H 1 response against insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. Patients with this autoimmunity must be injected with insulin that originates from other sources.

Section summary

Immune disruptions may involve insufficient immune responses or inappropriate immune targets. Immunodeficiency increases an individual's susceptibility to infections and cancers. Hypersensitivities are misdirected responses either to harmless foreign particles, as in the case of allergies, or to host factors, as in the case of autoimmunity. Reactions to self components may be the result of molecular mimicry.

Questions & Answers

what is metabolism
Allen Reply
list 20 element in their order
Dor Reply
anabolic, Because ATP is needed
Avuyileji Reply
definition of biology
LENARD Reply
the branch of science that deals with the study of plants and animals
Emmanuel
alkaloids are excretory product use for
Kekere Reply
What is venation
Mohamed Reply
what is evolution
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what is deglutition
Nalumansi Reply
what is biology
Sierrah Reply
biology is a type of science that studies living things
xjuicy_editzz
viruses are composed of what
Daniel Reply
what are some disease caused by virus
Daniel
what are some disease caused by virus
Daniel
what are some disease caused by virus
Daniel
Ebola
Alhassan
Ebola,rabies,polio,hepatitis and small pox
Magoba
Corona (viral disease)
Musoke
viruses kinda in a sense not "living" what mean that a virus molecule that attaches to living organisms cells to destroy/kill them. so to answer your question they are composed/made up of molecules (please note that I am not 100% sure, please feel free to correct me :] )
xjuicy_editzz
what is meiosis
Koosono
what is evolution?
Emmanuelfray
@koosono meiosis is the fusion of gametes (sex cell) to from a zygote and it occurs sexually
xjuicy_editzz
what is the use of biology
Tarkaa Reply
To widen our reasoning abilities about the past and the present events in biology and life at large
Musoke
To understand our biography
Musoke
to study living things
Narh
Among all these which one is the major difference between platyhelminthes and coelenterates? 1. are multicellular 2. have developed a mesoderm 3. reproduce sexually 4. reproduce asexually
Habeeb Reply
what is evolution?
Emmanuelfray Reply
how can you define biology in terms of a burning fire in the bush?
Emmanuelfray
what is a cell
Kagelelo Reply
cell is a functional and unit of life
Sarita
it is the building block n basic unit of life
Narh

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Source:  OpenStax, Biology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 29, 2016 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11448/1.10
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