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English first additional language

Grade 4

Heroes and heroines

Module 42

Great heroes – ordinary people

Activity 1

To express own opinion and give reasons for it [lo 5.2.7]

Form groups of about five learners each and do the following:

1. Discuss what the “traditional” hero looks like, and how most people see him.

2. Collect pictures of these typical heroes and make a poster depicting the typical hero (e.g. a knight on a horse, etc).

3. Talk about “ordinary” heroes or heroines – people who don’t necessarily look strong, brave or beautiful, but who have inner strength. What makes them heroic? How do you feel about them?

4. Choose one “ordinary” person you know personally, or of whom you have heard or read, who is a hero/heroine in your eyes. Tell the rest of the class about him/her and explain why you respect and admire that person.

“Ordinary” people can be heroes, as you have just discovered. As they say, true greatness lies within. One such person is Natalie du Toit, a former Cape Town schoolgirl. Although she is an “everyday” person, she is truly extraordinary.

Natalie loved swimming. It had always been her dream to participate in the Olympic Games, and she stood a chance in 2000, but she narrowly missed being selected. Then fate seemed to strike a cruel blow. Early in 2001, just as she was leaving the Newlands swimming bath one morning round about seven o’ clock, a motorist smashed into her scooter. She was badly injured, and had to have her leg amputated. After her traumatic accident, her dreams of becoming a famous swimmer seemed to have been shattered. But she didn’t give up. She was determined to carry on with her life and to fulfil her dreams. She says that she “grew up” after the accident, and only then realised what life was really all about. Today she believes in making the best of every day, because one doesn’t know what tomorrow holds.

In August 2002 Natalie broke two world records at the Commonwealth Games in Manchester, England and won two gold medals: one in the 50m and another in the 100m freestyle race for disabled swimmers. This was the first time she had ever competed as a disabled athlete. She made sport history when she became the first disabled swimmer to compete against non-disabled athletes in the 800m freestyle finals in an open Commonwealth Games race.

Her positive attitude and determination won the hearts of the British people and her story was frequently front-page news in the newspapers. She was called the “real heroine” of the Games. This is what one of the papers had to say: “She is a heroine, stripped of all self-pity. The mere fact that she is swimming again, is a miracle.”

Natalie was one of eight young people from 54 Commonwealth countries to be included in an official publication to celebrate Queen Elizabeth II’s Golden Jubilee year. According to Buckingham Palace she inspires other people by proving that one can overcome stumbling blocks in one’s life.

Don’t you think that she is a real heroine?

Activity 2

To understand and use adverbs of frequency [lo 6.2.6]

Look at the following sentences and pay special attention to the words in bold print:

  • Her story was frequently front-page news in the newspapers.
  • Natalie hardly ever thinks of herself as being disabled.
  • She often competes against non-disabled swimmers.

These words in bold are called adverbs of frequency. They are adverbs, because they modify (“tell more about”) the verbs, for example:

She competes . (competes = verb)When (how frequently) does she compete? = often

They are special adverbs called adverbs of frequency, because they tell us how frequently it happens.

See if you can make two sentences containing each of these words or word groups. Use the sentences above as examples.

1. frequently:

(a) ………………………………………………………………………………………

(b) ………………………………………………………………………………………

2. hardly ever:

(a) ………………………………………………………………………………………

(b) ………………………………………………………………………………………

3 often:

(a) ………………………………………………………………………………………

(b) ………………………………………………………………………………………

Activity 3

To develop vocabulary [lo 6.6.4]

You know that a noun is a word that names things. Look at the following nouns:

  • motorist (someone who drives a motor-car)
  • swimmer (someone who swims)
  • athlete (someone who does athletics)
  • hero (someone who is heroic)

These nouns are words for people who do certain things.They are called agent nouns.

See whether you know the agent nouns for:

  1. A person who gardens
  1. A person who acts
  1. A person who plays the piano
  1. A person who is involved in politics
  1. A person who investigates cases for the police (he/she detects who committed the crime)
or

Can you see how the words are formed? Say / write something about it.

AND FINALLY, IF YOU STILL WANT TO DO SOMETHING……

Find out more about Nkosi Johnson, a most heroic little boy, and share his history in class…

Assessment

Learning outcome 3: reading and viewing

The learner will be able to read and view for information and enjoyment, and to respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.

Assessment standard

We know this when the learner:

3.5 reads for pleasure and information:

3.5.1 reads fiction and non-fiction books at an appropriate reading and language level.

Learning outcome 5: thinking and reasoning

The learner will able to use language to think and reason, and access, process and use information for learning.

Assessment standard

We know this when the learner:

5.2 uses language for thinking:

5.2.7 expresses an opinion and gives a reason for it.

Learning outcome 6: language structure and use

The learner will know and be able to use the sounds, words and grammar of the language and interpret texts.

Assessment standard

We know this when the learner:

6.1 understands and uses some question forms, such as ‘Why didn’t ...?’, ‘Have you ever ...?’, ‘Do you think ...?’

6.2 uses the tenses introduced in the Foundation Phase to communicate orally and in writing, e.g.:

6.2.6 adverbs of frequency (e.g. She hardly ever visits me.);

6.6 develops own vocabulary:

6.6.4 understands between 2 000 and 3 500 common spoken words in context by the end of grade 4. Learners who will study some of the other learning areas through their additional language should aim at 3 500 words.

Questions & Answers

Application of nanotechnology in medicine
what is variations in raman spectra for nanomaterials
Jyoti Reply
I only see partial conversation and what's the question here!
Crow Reply
what about nanotechnology for water purification
RAW Reply
please someone correct me if I'm wrong but I think one can use nanoparticles, specially silver nanoparticles for water treatment.
Damian
yes that's correct
Professor
I think
Professor
what is the stm
Brian Reply
is there industrial application of fullrenes. What is the method to prepare fullrene on large scale.?
Rafiq
industrial application...? mmm I think on the medical side as drug carrier, but you should go deeper on your research, I may be wrong
Damian
How we are making nano material?
LITNING Reply
what is a peer
LITNING Reply
What is meant by 'nano scale'?
LITNING Reply
What is STMs full form?
LITNING
scanning tunneling microscope
Sahil
how nano science is used for hydrophobicity
Santosh
Do u think that Graphene and Fullrene fiber can be used to make Air Plane body structure the lightest and strongest. Rafiq
Rafiq
what is differents between GO and RGO?
Mahi
what is simplest way to understand the applications of nano robots used to detect the cancer affected cell of human body.? How this robot is carried to required site of body cell.? what will be the carrier material and how can be detected that correct delivery of drug is done Rafiq
Rafiq
if virus is killing to make ARTIFICIAL DNA OF GRAPHENE FOR KILLED THE VIRUS .THIS IS OUR ASSUMPTION
Anam
analytical skills graphene is prepared to kill any type viruses .
Anam
what is Nano technology ?
Bob Reply
write examples of Nano molecule?
Bob
The nanotechnology is as new science, to scale nanometric
brayan
nanotechnology is the study, desing, synthesis, manipulation and application of materials and functional systems through control of matter at nanoscale
Damian
Is there any normative that regulates the use of silver nanoparticles?
Damian Reply
what king of growth are you checking .?
Renato
What fields keep nano created devices from performing or assimulating ? Magnetic fields ? Are do they assimilate ?
Stoney Reply
why we need to study biomolecules, molecular biology in nanotechnology?
Adin Reply
?
Kyle
yes I'm doing my masters in nanotechnology, we are being studying all these domains as well..
Adin
why?
Adin
what school?
Kyle
biomolecules are e building blocks of every organics and inorganic materials.
Joe
anyone know any internet site where one can find nanotechnology papers?
Damian Reply
research.net
kanaga
sciencedirect big data base
Ernesto
Introduction about quantum dots in nanotechnology
Praveena Reply
hi
Loga
what does nano mean?
Anassong Reply
nano basically means 10^(-9). nanometer is a unit to measure length.
Bharti
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Source:  OpenStax, English first additional language grade 4. OpenStax CNX. Sep 18, 2009 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11093/1.1
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