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You’re absolutely right - academics find the work-in-progress a difficult concept yet its OK to have a work in progress model behind closed doors! Looks like an education task for us.

A very good point about guarantees of service. COL, of course, does everything it reasonably can to ensure this quality of service. That said, hardware does fail and the network can go down.

I’ve worked for Universities where the LMS was regularly out of service or shut down for regular maintenance - and folk used to accept this. However, when it’s an external free service - the expectations on service delivery seem to be far higher — go figure!

As you’ve pointed out - WikiEducator’s downtime has been far lower than industry standards for a comparable service of its size. I don’t have the figures with me - but in the last 18 mnths we’ve had about 8 - 10 hours total downtime including software upgrades. We run a LAMP configuration and these machines just chug away . Two of these downtime instances were out of our control. In one case hardware failure and another where problem with the German ISP network. Most CIO’s dream of this level of uptime! That said - it doesn’t remove the perception of the perceived risk of external free services.

mmmm this has got me thinking - I wonder whether a model of shared financial responsibility for infrastructure services might be the way to go?

This way local institutions can then take shared responsibility and ownership of the services they support on campus - almost a Web 2.0 model of financing ICT services.

COL is like any business we do a proper cost-benefit and corresponding risk analysis in the way we configure our WikiEducator service. Its conceivable to provide guarantees for 24/7 support with synchronized mirrors all over the world - but current traffic levels wouldn’t warrant the cost. Consequently shared decision-making over technical infrastructure — when folk are contributing real dollars to ensure their wish-list — may be the way to go here.

Great reflections and appreciate the candid reflections.

4. wikirandy - december 1st, 2007 at 2:36 am

Hi Leigh, I’m impressed by the breadth and depth of your contribution here, and your leadership within Otago, and the WikiEducator community.

Some observations:

  1. This is a great case study to kickstart a dialogue among and within educational institutions as to the merits of pursuing an open educational content strategy, and by extension using WikiEducator as a development platform. I really like what you’ve listed as the benefits of working with WikiEducator. There might be one other benefit worth listing, and that is the “inside track / being part of a community of opinion leaders related to discovering / playing with new models for educational organisations to cut costs, improve productivity, discover new markets - you get the drift….
  2. In the Vision for content developed on WikiEducator you mention….“Ironically, through developing curriculum and content on the Wikieducator platform, we are discovering more opportunities for local collaboration before realising benefits of international collaboration”…this is worthy of considerable exploration…another benefit to add to the list - breaking down of silos internally..increasing dialogue….maybe there’s an opportunity for a panel discussion here…bringing in some diverse viewpoints for consideration….even from other fields.
  3. Regarding who first - teachers or students…I’m of the view that you create a range of access points for people to become involved…and have each perspective inform the other - kind of like participatory action research…
  4. Otago as a leader in NZ and Australia - you forgot to mention: “The World” - Your leadership, in your institution, and within WikiEducator has helped catapult both you and Otago to significant prominence in many quarters. As a fellow WikEducator, I value your insights, dedication and active involvement, commitment to the open educational content march, and clarity vision!

Questions & Answers

Is there any normative that regulates the use of silver nanoparticles?
Damian Reply
what king of growth are you checking .?
Renato
What fields keep nano created devices from performing or assimulating ? Magnetic fields ? Are do they assimilate ?
Stoney Reply
why we need to study biomolecules, molecular biology in nanotechnology?
Adin Reply
?
Kyle
yes I'm doing my masters in nanotechnology, we are being studying all these domains as well..
Adin
why?
Adin
what school?
Kyle
biomolecules are e building blocks of every organics and inorganic materials.
Joe
anyone know any internet site where one can find nanotechnology papers?
Damian Reply
research.net
kanaga
sciencedirect big data base
Ernesto
Introduction about quantum dots in nanotechnology
Praveena Reply
what does nano mean?
Anassong Reply
nano basically means 10^(-9). nanometer is a unit to measure length.
Bharti
do you think it's worthwhile in the long term to study the effects and possibilities of nanotechnology on viral treatment?
Damian Reply
absolutely yes
Daniel
how to know photocatalytic properties of tio2 nanoparticles...what to do now
Akash Reply
it is a goid question and i want to know the answer as well
Maciej
characteristics of micro business
Abigail
for teaching engĺish at school how nano technology help us
Anassong
Do somebody tell me a best nano engineering book for beginners?
s. Reply
there is no specific books for beginners but there is book called principle of nanotechnology
NANO
what is fullerene does it is used to make bukky balls
Devang Reply
are you nano engineer ?
s.
fullerene is a bucky ball aka Carbon 60 molecule. It was name by the architect Fuller. He design the geodesic dome. it resembles a soccer ball.
Tarell
what is the actual application of fullerenes nowadays?
Damian
That is a great question Damian. best way to answer that question is to Google it. there are hundreds of applications for buck minister fullerenes, from medical to aerospace. you can also find plenty of research papers that will give you great detail on the potential applications of fullerenes.
Tarell
what is the Synthesis, properties,and applications of carbon nano chemistry
Abhijith Reply
Mostly, they use nano carbon for electronics and for materials to be strengthened.
Virgil
is Bucky paper clear?
CYNTHIA
carbon nanotubes has various application in fuel cells membrane, current research on cancer drug,and in electronics MEMS and NEMS etc
NANO
so some one know about replacing silicon atom with phosphorous in semiconductors device?
s. Reply
Yeah, it is a pain to say the least. You basically have to heat the substarte up to around 1000 degrees celcius then pass phosphene gas over top of it, which is explosive and toxic by the way, under very low pressure.
Harper
Do you know which machine is used to that process?
s.
how to fabricate graphene ink ?
SUYASH Reply
for screen printed electrodes ?
SUYASH
What is lattice structure?
s. Reply
of graphene you mean?
Ebrahim
or in general
Ebrahim
in general
s.
Graphene has a hexagonal structure
tahir
On having this app for quite a bit time, Haven't realised there's a chat room in it.
Cied
what is biological synthesis of nanoparticles
Sanket Reply
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Source:  OpenStax, The impact of open source software on education. OpenStax CNX. Mar 30, 2009 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col10431/1.7
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