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  • Chemical Equilibria
  • Equilibrium Constants
  • Shifting Equilibria: Le Châtelier’s Principle
  • Equilibrium Calculations
An image depicts three tan squares, lying side-by-side along the upper left corner. Two of the same squares also lie side-by-side in the lower right corner. Each square has a black dot in the center. One of the squares is labeled, “C O subscript 2,” and has a double-headed arrow pointing from it to a red tube-like structure that runs between the squares across the image from the upper right to the lower left. This arrow is labeled, “C O subscript 2 dissolved in plasma.” The red tube has two round red shapes in it, and the upper one is labeled, “C O subscript 2 carried in red blood cells.” The gaps between the squares and the red tube are colored light blue. One of the squares along the top of the image is labeled, “C O subscript 2,” and is connected by a double-headed arrow to an equation in the red tube that is labeled, “C O subscript 2, a plus sign, H subscript 2 O, right-facing arrow, H subscript 2 C O subscript 3, right-facing arrow, H C O subscript 3 superscript negative sign, plus sign, H superscript positive sign.” The compound “H C O subscript 3 superscript negative sign” is then connected by a double-headed arrow to the space in the red tube and is labeled, “H C O subscript 3 superscript negative sign dissolved in plasma as carbonic acid.”
Movement of carbon dioxide through tissues and blood cells involves several equilibrium reactions.

Imagine a beach populated with sunbathers and swimmers. As those basking in the sun get too hot and want to cool off, they head into the surf to swim. As the swimmers tire, they head to the beach to rest. If these two rates of transfer (sunbathers entering the water, swimmers leaving the water) are equal, the number of sunbathers and swimmers would be constant, or at equilibrium, although the identities of the people are constantly changing from sunbather to swimmer and back. An analogous situation occurs in chemical reactions. Reactions can occur in both directions simultaneously (reactants to products and products to reactants) and eventually reach a state of balance.

These balanced two-way reactions occur all around and even in us. For example, they occur in our blood, where the reaction between carbon dioxide and water forms carbonic acid ( HCO 3 ) ( [link] ). Human physiology is adapted to the amount of ionized products produced by this reaction ( HCO 3 and H + ). In this chapter, you will learn how to predict the position of the balance and the yield of a product of a reaction under specific conditions, how to change a reaction's conditions to increase or reduce yield, and how to evaluate an equilibrium system's reaction to disturbances.

Questions & Answers

what is Fibonacci sequence?
Shaina Reply
what is hydrocarbons compound?
Haile Reply
what is the 3d-orbital of Ti³+
Timi Reply
What is Lewis acids
Yabsra Reply
Lewis acid is any substance, such as the H+ ion, that can accept a pair of nonbonding electrons. In other words, a Lewis acid is an electron-pair acceptor. 
betuel
Thanks
Yabsra
🤜🤛
betuel
🤜🤛
betuel
describe the way of seperation of water and kerosene
Tang Reply
Kerosene is a hydrocarbon and non-polar. Water is a polar molecule. So a mixture of both liquids is immicible and by adding them to a separation funnel, you can open the tap flowing the less dense liquid in a container. You can read on bond polarity and separation techniques on Google.
Abdelkarim
kerosene will never with water cos its a immiscible liquid
SUNDAY
what is Chemistry
Papie Reply
Chemistry is a branch of natural light science
Yabsra
10 sentences discussing factors affecting solubility
Sara Reply
why is chemistry a science subject
Ukwumonu Reply
10 sentences discussing factors affecting solubility
Sara
How to name carbonique Atom
lix Reply
how many period do we have in the period table
Joseph Reply
187
Ukwumonu
how do i do ionic equations
Amantle Reply
what is the formula for alkanes
Amantle
CnH2n+2 is the alkane formula.
Walter
whenever you get off your fat arse
then you can start to do some real work
hmm
gabson
How much sodium hydroxide must be dissolved in 100mL of water to prepare a 3.95molL^_1
Cindy
what is vast array
benedict Reply
what is Nanoscience
benedict
from health care to manufacturing. Australian academy of science
what is the compound
Yaasmiin
what is Chemistry
Papie
What is array
Yabsra
what will be the total moles of all the molecule present when the different quantities of following gases are mixed together at step 4g of CH4, 22.4 dm3 of oxygen, 11.2dm3 of carbon dioxide and 3.02×10^23 molecules of ammonia.
Soni Reply
0.5 moles of methane and 0.5 mole of sulfur dioxide are mixed together what will be the mass of mixture. a.20g b.40g c.50g d.55g e.60g
Soni Reply
answer;b
Ravina
thnx
Soni
"the halogens are all oxidizing agents" what is the reason for this observation
Kelvin Reply
they are halogens....that is why numbnut 😁
This is not the place to talk down or be rude. Anonymous User keep your comments to yourself if you can't be more respectful.
Dionne

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Source:  OpenStax, Chemistry. OpenStax CNX. May 20, 2015 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11760/1.9
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