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The resting membrane potential is a result of different concentrations inside and outside the cell.
Ion Concentration Inside and Outside Neurons
Ion Extracellular concentration (mM) Intracellular concentration (mM) Ratio outside/inside
Na + 145 12 12
K+ 4 155 0.026
Cl 120 4 30
Organic anions (A−) 100
The resting membrane potential of minus seventy volts is maintained by a sodium/potassium transporter that transports sodium ions out of the cell and potassium ions in. Voltage gated sodium and potassium channels are closed. In response to a nerve impulse, some sodium channels open, allowing sodium ions to enter the cell. The membrane starts to depolarize; in other words, the charge across the membrane lessens. If the membrane potential increases to the threshold of excitation, all the sodium channels open. At the peak action potential, potassium channels open and potassium ions leave the cell. The membrane eventually becomes hyperpolarized.
The (a) resting membrane potential is a result of different concentrations of Na + and K + ions inside and outside the cell. A nerve impulse causes Na + to enter the cell, resulting in (b) depolarization. At the peak action potential, K + channels open and the cell becomes (c) hyperpolarized.

Action potential

A neuron can receive input from other neurons and, if this input is strong enough, send the signal to downstream neurons. Transmission of a signal between neurons is generally carried by a chemical called a neurotransmitter. Transmission of a signal within a neuron (from dendrite to axon terminal) is carried by a brief reversal of the resting membrane potential called an action potential    . When neurotransmitter molecules bind to receptors located on a neuron’s dendrites, ion channels open. At excitatory synapses, this opening allows positive ions to enter the neuron and results in depolarization    of the membrane—a decrease in the difference in voltage between the inside and outside of the neuron. A stimulus from a sensory cell or another neuron depolarizes the target neuron to its threshold potential (-55 mV). Na + channels in the axon hillock open, allowing positive ions to enter the cell ( [link] and [link] ). Once the sodium channels open, the neuron completely depolarizes to a membrane potential of about +40 mV. Action potentials are considered an "all-or nothing" event, in that, once the threshold potential is reached, the neuron always completely depolarizes. Once depolarization is complete, the cell must now "reset" its membrane voltage back to the resting potential. To accomplish this, the Na + channels close and cannot be opened. This begins the neuron's refractory period    , in which it cannot produce another action potential because its sodium channels will not open. At the same time, voltage-gated K + channels open, allowing K + to leave the cell. As K + ions leave the cell, the membrane potential once again becomes negative. The diffusion of K + out of the cell actually hyperpolarizes the cell, in that the membrane potential becomes more negative than the cell's normal resting potential. At this point, the sodium channels will return to their resting state, meaning they are ready to open again if the membrane potential again exceeds the threshold potential. Eventually the extra K + ions diffuse out of the cell through the potassium leakage channels, bringing the cell from its hyperpolarized state, back to its resting membrane potential.

Art connection

Graph plots membrane potential in millivolts versus time. The membrane remains at the resting potential of -70 millivolts until a nerve impulse occurs in step 1. Some sodium channels open, and the potential begins to rapidly climb past the threshold of excitation of -55 millivolts, at which point all the sodium channels open. At the peak action potential, the potential begins to rapidly drop as potassium channels open and sodium channels close. As a result, the membrane repolarizes past the resting membrane potential and becomes hyperpolarized. The membrane potential then gradually returns to normal.
The formation of an action potential can be divided into five steps: (1) A stimulus from a sensory cell or another neuron causes the target cell to depolarize toward the threshold potential. (2) If the threshold of excitation is reached, all Na + channels open and the membrane depolarizes. (3) At the peak action potential, K + channels open and K + begins to leave the cell. At the same time, Na + channels close. (4) The membrane becomes hyperpolarized as K + ions continue to leave the cell. The hyperpolarized membrane is in a refractory period and cannot fire. (5) The K + channels close and the Na + /K + transporter restores the resting potential.

Potassium channel blockers, such as amiodarone and procainamide, which are used to treat abnormal electrical activity in the heart, called cardiac dysrhythmia, impede the movement of K + through voltage-gated K + channels. Which part of the action potential would you expect potassium channels to affect?

Questions & Answers

What is Staining?
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Biology is the study of life
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Ysabella Reply
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Biology is a diverse branch of science that deals with mostly living things
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They are organic catalysts that alter the rate of chemical reactions in the body.
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Basic Functional Unit of Life
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biology is the study of living organisms and their interactions with one another and their environments
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which of the following event does not occur during some stages of interface?
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What is microfilaments
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What is multicellular organisms
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these are organisms with more than two cells
Bangha
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Fertilization
Gyamfi
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YXNG Reply
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James
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YXNG
name the components of faeces
Damali
undigested carbohydrate, fibre
Sandra
what are unicellular organisms..?
Sackson
they have only one cell
Sandra
faeces contains many undigested food materials, after the food has been digested then it will be absorbed in the blood stream for assimilation.,......... but the remains toxic materials are stored in the rectum these toxic materials are the faeces and it contains bile salts, the polysaccharides .
James
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James
unicellular organisms are the ones with only single cell.
James
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Richard
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Damali
10 stages
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eukaryotic cell
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Source:  OpenStax, Biology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 29, 2016 Download for free at http://cnx.org/content/col11448/1.10
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