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Components of CSF Circulation
Lateral ventricles Third ventricle Cerebral aqueduct Fourth ventricle Central canal Subarachnoid space
Location in CNS Cerebrum Diencephalon Midbrain Between pons/upper medulla and cerebellum Spinal cord External to entire CNS
Blood vessel structure Choroid plexus Choroid plexus None Choroid plexus None Arachnoid granulations

Disorders of the…

Central nervous system

The supply of blood to the brain is crucial to its ability to perform many functions. Without a steady supply of oxygen, and to a lesser extent glucose, the nervous tissue in the brain cannot keep up its extensive electrical activity. These nutrients get into the brain through the blood, and if blood flow is interrupted, neurological function is compromised.

The common name for a disruption of blood supply to the brain is a stroke. It is caused by a blockage to an artery in the brain. The blockage is from some type of embolus: a blood clot, a fat embolus, or an air bubble. When the blood cannot travel through the artery, the surrounding tissue that is deprived starves and dies. Strokes will often result in the loss of very specific functions. A stroke in the lateral medulla, for example, can cause a loss in the ability to swallow. Sometimes, seemingly unrelated functions will be lost because they are dependent on structures in the same region. Along with the swallowing in the previous example, a stroke in that region could affect sensory functions from the face or extremities because important white matter pathways also pass through the lateral medulla. Loss of blood flow to specific regions of the cortex can lead to the loss of specific higher functions, from the ability to recognize faces to the ability to move a particular region of the body. Severe or limited memory loss can be the result of a temporal lobe stroke.

Related to strokes are transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), which can also be called “mini-strokes.” These are events in which a physical blockage may be temporary, cutting off the blood supply and oxygen to a region, but not to the extent that it causes cell death in that region. While the neurons in that area are recovering from the event, neurological function may be lost. Function can return if the area is able to recover from the event.

Recovery from a stroke (or TIA) is strongly dependent on the speed of treatment. Often, the person who is present and notices something is wrong must then make a decision. The mnemonic F A S T helps people remember what to look for when someone is dealing with sudden losses of neurological function. If someone complains of feeling “funny,” check these things quickly: Look at the person’s face. Does he or she have problems moving F ace muscles and making regular facial expressions? Ask the person to raise his or her A rms above the head. Can the person lift one arm but not the other? Has the person’s S peech changed? Is he or she slurring words or having trouble saying things? If any of these things have happened, then it is T ime to call for help.

Sometimes, treatment with blood-thinning drugs can alleviate the problem, and recovery is possible. If the tissue is damaged, the amazing thing about the nervous system is that it is adaptable. With physical, occupational, and speech therapy, victims of strokes can recover, or more accurately relearn, functions.

Chapter review

The CNS has a privileged blood supply established by the blood-brain barrier. Establishing this barrier are anatomical structures that help to protect and isolate the CNS. The arterial blood to the brain comes from the internal carotid and vertebral arteries, which both contribute to the unique circle of Willis that provides constant perfusion of the brain even if one of the blood vessels is blocked or narrowed. That blood is eventually filtered to make a separate medium, the CSF, that circulates within the spaces of the brain and then into the surrounding space defined by the meninges, the protective covering of the brain and spinal cord.

The blood that nourishes the brain and spinal cord is behind the glial-cell–enforced blood-brain barrier, which limits the exchange of material from blood vessels with the interstitial fluid of the nervous tissue. Thus, metabolic wastes are collected in cerebrospinal fluid that circulates through the CNS. This fluid is produced by filtering blood at the choroid plexuses in the four ventricles of the brain. It then circulates through the ventricles and into the subarachnoid space, between the pia mater and the arachnoid mater. From the arachnoid granulations, CSF is reabsorbed into the blood, removing the waste from the privileged central nervous tissue.

The blood, now with the reabsorbed CSF, drains out of the cranium through the dural sinuses. The dura mater is the tough outer covering of the CNS, which is anchored to the inner surface of the cranial and vertebral cavities. It surrounds the venous space known as the dural sinuses, which connect to the jugular veins, where blood drains from the head and neck.

Watch this animation to see how blood flows to the brain and passes through the circle of Willis before being distributed through the cerebrum. The circle of Willis is a specialized arrangement of arteries that ensure constant perfusion of the cerebrum even in the event of a blockage of one of the arteries in the circle. The animation shows the normal direction of flow through the circle of Willis to the middle cerebral artery. Where would the blood come from if there were a blockage just posterior to the middle cerebral artery on the left?

If blood could not get to the middle cerebral artery through the posterior circulation, the blood would flow around the circle of Willis to reach that artery from an anterior vessel. Blood flow would just reverse within the circle.

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Watch this video that describes the procedure known as the lumbar puncture, a medical procedure used to sample the CSF. Because of the anatomy of the CNS, it is a relative safe location to insert a needle. Why is the lumbar puncture performed in the lower lumbar area of the vertebral column?

The spinal cord ends in the upper lumbar area of the vertebral column, so a needle inserted lower than that will not damage the nervous tissue of the CNS.

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Watch this animation that shows the flow of CSF through the brain and spinal cord, and how it originates from the ventricles and then spreads into the space within the meninges, where the fluids then move into the venous sinuses to return to the cardiovascular circulation. What are the structures that produce CSF and where are they found? How are the structures indicated in this animation?

The choroid plexuses of the ventricles make CSF. As shown, there is a little of the blue color appearing in each ventricle that is joined by the color flowing from the other ventricles.

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Questions & Answers

blood is unique it is the only flueid tissue in the body
yeh
Ayoub
this is fascinating
mery
for real
Musa
what is blood
sujon Reply
lol. the red substance in your body. that circulates food nutrients and oxygen
Nii
Blood is composed of plasma and formed elements. The plasma is about 55% of blood and is about 80-90% water usually. The other 20-10% accounts for solutes such as ions, nutrients, gases, and hormones.
Carmelo
Blood is a fluid type of connective tissue and it's formed elements (cells) include RBC, WBC, and plalets.
Carmelo
what is sasamoid bone?
hafeez Reply
how many types of bone on the base of shape
hafeez
5
Husna
i want join the conversation
juwar Reply
Alright
Haya
feel free to do so
Vida
where are you from ?
Haya
hi what's up
Mar
well hello
emad
Im from kashmir,but I'm studying in punjab
Aabid
Hello
Aabid
I'm studying pharmacy at JUST University in jordan
emad
so am i emad 😅
shereen
afg
Ayoub
I am Javed Ali
Javedali
hello i am hafeez from gilgit
hafeez
explain the mechanism(release and control) of hormonal interplay for fluid and electrolyte.
Cassie Reply
There are three main ways in which hormones may be released. Humoral stimulus - occurs when their is an inbalance in electrolytes in the body. Neural stimulus - occurs when autonomic nerve fibers stimulate glands to release hormones.
Carmelo
Hormonal stimulus - occurs when a hormone causes another hormone to be released from another gland.
Carmelo
what are the main pumps found in the cell membrane
pauline Reply
calcium
Schmidt
sodium potassium pump
Husna
Differences between ligaments and catilage
joy Reply
differences between catilage and ligaments
joy
Both are different types of connective tissues. Second difference is that cartilage contains chondroblasts rather than fibroblasts. Their is also slight differences on their extracrullar matrix. For ex, cartilages tend to contain more collagen than tendons and ligaments.
Carmelo
Both types of connective tissue also function differently. Ligaments connect bone to bone, while cartilage have a variety of function like cushioning bones and giving structural support like on the nose and ears.
Carmelo
explain the causes of the refractory period of a nerve fiber
Sophia Reply
Refractory period immediately following stimulation during which a nerve or muscle is unresponsive to further stimulation. Brief pause in stimulus or excitation.
Nii
To add on, the brief pause is produced because of the event of establishing a resting membrane potential that needs to be produced before depolarization (another action potential) can occur again.
Carmelo
The refractory period also gives a chance for neurotransmitters to be replenished on the axon terminal.
Carmelo
what is hypoxia
Akas Reply
I guess it's low supply the oxygen to the tissues
famuyiwa
yup
Natalie
A condition in which tissues (especially the blood) are deprived of an adequate supply of oxygen
Panthera
hanifa pia uko hapa
Panthera
Hypoxia is the lack of oxygen concentration in the blood. Therefore, tissues will receive a low concentration of oxygen. Usually our bodies respond to Hypoxia by stimulating erythropoiesis in red bone marrow.
Carmelo
hypoxia is the lack of oxygen in blood absolutely.
hafeez
hypoxia: is a condition in wich the concentration of oxygen goes down in tissue or all over the body but the low concentration of oxygen in blood is called hypoxiemia.
Ayoub
where is present Glenoid Cavity ?
A- Reply
what is the muscular tissue
Md Reply
muscular tissue is a type of tissue that provide to help in cotraction to aur body.
A-
What's the difference in epithelial, connective, muscular and muscle tissue
Gifty
and it's similarities
Gifty
what is limb bone
Akshu Reply
this are bone attaching or joining to the axial bone.axial bone including skull,vertebrate and ribcage
Eliasi
how many bones make up the skull?
Matthew
22 bones
Husna
22bones
Bhanu
where is present Glenoid cavity ?
A-
how many bone in skull
Md
almost there are 8 bones in skull
hafeez
Explain the stages of mitosis and cell division
Bella Reply
Bella, this is a very long process to detail by text. However, to keep it brief, mitosis has four phases in order: prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase which sometimes followed by cytokinesis. Note that some cells do not always do the cytokinesis phase.
Carmelo
As a result, some of the cells in the body are multinuclear (osteoclasts for ex).
Carmelo
explain further
Nana
difference between mitosis and meosis
Nana
systems of human body
Udezue Reply
define lymphatic system And give the composition of lymphatic fluid
sakshi Reply
the network of vessels through which lymphatic drains From the tissue into blood.lymph contain variety of substance like salts, glucose, proteins and fatsand water, white blood cells
Bhanu
yeah
Hassan

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Source:  OpenStax, Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 04, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11496/1.8
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