<< Chapter < Page Chapter >> Page >
By the end of this section, you will be able to:
  • Describe the bones that articulate together to form selected synovial joints
  • Discuss the movements available at each joint
  • Describe the structures that support and prevent excess movements at each joint

Each synovial joint of the body is specialized to perform certain movements. The movements that are allowed are determined by the structural classification for each joint. For example, a multiaxial ball-and-socket joint has much more mobility than a uniaxial hinge joint. However, the ligaments and muscles that support a joint may place restrictions on the total range of motion available. Thus, the ball-and-socket joint of the shoulder has little in the way of ligament support, which gives the shoulder a very large range of motion. In contrast, movements at the hip joint are restricted by strong ligaments, which reduce its range of motion but confer stability during standing and weight bearing.

This section will examine the anatomy of selected synovial joints of the body. Anatomical names for most joints are derived from the names of the bones that articulate at that joint, although some joints, such as the elbow, hip, and knee joints are exceptions to this general naming scheme.

Articulations of the vertebral column

In addition to being held together by the intervertebral discs, adjacent vertebrae also articulate with each other at synovial joints formed between the superior and inferior articular processes called zygapophysial joints    (facet joints) (see [link] ). These are plane joints that provide for only limited motions between the vertebrae. The orientation of the articular processes at these joints varies in different regions of the vertebral column and serves to determine the types of motions available in each vertebral region. The cervical and lumbar regions have the greatest ranges of motions.

In the neck, the articular processes of cervical vertebrae are flattened and generally face upward or downward. This orientation provides the cervical vertebral column with extensive ranges of motion for flexion, extension, lateral flexion, and rotation. In the thoracic region, the downward projecting and overlapping spinous processes, along with the attached thoracic cage, greatly limit flexion, extension, and lateral flexion. However, the flattened and vertically positioned thoracic articular processes allow for the greatest range of rotation within the vertebral column. The lumbar region allows for considerable extension, flexion, and lateral flexion, but the orientation of the articular processes largely prohibits rotation.

The articulations formed between the skull, the atlas (C1 vertebra), and the axis (C2 vertebra) differ from the articulations in other vertebral areas and play important roles in movement of the head. The atlanto-occipital joint    is formed by the articulations between the superior articular processes of the atlas and the occipital condyles on the base of the skull. This articulation has a pronounced U-shaped curvature, oriented along the anterior-posterior axis. This allows the skull to rock forward and backward, producing flexion and extension of the head. This moves the head up and down, as when shaking your head “yes.”

Questions & Answers

the inflammation of spinal cord is called
Francis Reply
TM partial transver myelitis
Ayan
Transverse myelitis
Amit
transverse mylitis
Gopi
T M means transeverse myelitis
Ayan
what is anatomy
Bruce Reply
is the study of human structure or various parts of the body
Adoma
What is the chordae tendineae and where is located? Where is the Aorta located?
Sovilace Reply
What is the meaning of aponuerosis
Veronica Reply
a sheet of pearly white fibrous tissue that takes the place of a tendon in flat muscles having a wide area of attachment.
Hassan
example of epitheliam tissue
Nirob Reply
what is systemic anatomy
Friday Reply
it's a study of organ structure
Amarachi
definition of anatomy and physiology
Kapil Reply
in anatomy we study about structure of human body........ in physiology we study about function
Zahid
Explain the anatomy
Junaid
structure of heart
Anusha
explain biology
saviour
biology is the science of life. biologists study the structure, function, growth, origin, evolution and distribution of living organisms.
Kadence
how is albino affected
Ujam Reply
what are the important stuff in the papillary layer
Ujam
Melanie's is responsible for the change in the color of the skin
Ujam
what happened when they are badly severed
Ujam
what happened when they are badly severed
Ujam
Examples of glial cells?
Nesh Reply
glial cell s help in the attractive foces of motion in the cellular network
Ujam
What is glial cell?
Esther
what is gland
Nirob
a gland is a group of cells or group of similar cells that secretes substances
Veronica
what is homeostasis
Laura Reply
homeostasis- The ability to maintain relatively stable internal conditions even though the outside world changes continuously. i,e, maintaining normal values in your body such as Adequate blood levels,blood pressure, heart activity and blood pressure.
Williams
thank you
Laura
Give atleast three reasons to study anatomy and physiology
George Reply
It helps to know about the body structure properly and administer proper care for the patient
Opeyemi
what's augmentin
Aphet Reply
augmentin is a type of combination antibiotic.
wintana
Can you explain to Heart anatomy in details please?
Handren Reply
definition of anatomy and physiology
Sardar Reply
Anatomy is the study structure of the body while physiology is the study of function of the body
Ayan
What is a dorsal cavity?
John Reply

Get the best Anatomy & Physiology course in your pocket!





Source:  OpenStax, Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 04, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11496/1.8
Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc.

Notification Switch

Would you like to follow the 'Anatomy & Physiology' conversation and receive update notifications?

Ask