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Areolar tissue shows little specialization. It contains all the cell types and fibers previously described and is distributed in a random, web-like fashion. It fills the spaces between muscle fibers, surrounds blood and lymph vessels, and supports organs in the abdominal cavity. Areolar tissue underlies most epithelia and represents the connective tissue component of epithelial membranes, which are described further in a later section.

Reticular tissue is a mesh-like, supportive framework for soft organs such as lymphatic tissue, the spleen, and the liver ( [link] ). Reticular cells produce the reticular fibers that form the network onto which other cells attach. It derives its name from the Latin reticulus , which means “little net.”

Reticular tissue

This figure shows reticular tissue alongside a micrograph. The diagram shows a series of small, oval cells embedded in a yellowish matrix. Thin reticular fibers spread and crisscross throughout the matrix. In the micrograph, the reticular fibers are thin, dark, and seem to travel between the many deeply stained cells.
This is a loose connective tissue made up of a network of reticular fibers that provides a supportive framework for soft organs. LM × 1600. (Micrograph provided by the Regents of University of Michigan Medical School © 2012)

Dense connective tissue

Dense connective tissue contains more collagen fibers than does loose connective tissue. As a consequence, it displays greater resistance to stretching. There are two major categories of dense connective tissue: regular and irregular. Dense regular connective tissue fibers are parallel to each other, enhancing tensile strength and resistance to stretching in the direction of the fiber orientations. Ligaments and tendons are made of dense regular connective tissue, but in ligaments not all fibers are parallel. Dense regular elastic tissue contains elastin fibers in addition to collagen fibers, which allows the ligament to return to its original length after stretching. The ligaments in the vocal folds and between the vertebrae in the vertebral column are elastic.

In dense irregular connective tissue, the direction of fibers is random. This arrangement gives the tissue greater strength in all directions and less strength in one particular direction. In some tissues, fibers crisscross and form a mesh. In other tissues, stretching in several directions is achieved by alternating layers where fibers run in the same orientation in each layer, and it is the layers themselves that are stacked at an angle. The dermis of the skin is an example of dense irregular connective tissue rich in collagen fibers. Dense irregular elastic tissues give arterial walls the strength and the ability to regain original shape after stretching ( [link] ).

Dense connective tissue

Part A shows a diagram of regular dense connective tissue alongside a micrograph. The tissue is composed of parallel, thread-like collagen fibers running vertically through the diagram. Between the vertical fibers, several dark, oval shaped fibroblast nuclei are visible. In the micrograph, the whitish collagen strands run horizontally. Several dark purple fibroblast nuclei are embedded in the lightly stained matrix. Part B shows a diagram of irregular dense connective tissue on the left and a micrograph on the right. In the diagram, the collagen fibers are arranged in bundles that curve and loop throughout the tissue. The fibers within a bundle run parallel to each other, but separate bundles crisscross throughout the tissue. Because of this, the irregular dense connective tissue appears less organized than the regular dense connective tissue. This is also evident in the micrograph, where the white collagen bundles radiate throughout the micrograph in all directions. The fibroblasts are visible as red stained cells with dark purple nuclei.
(a) Dense regular connective tissue consists of collagenous fibers packed into parallel bundles. (b) Dense irregular connective tissue consists of collagenous fibers interwoven into a mesh-like network. From top, LM × 1000, LM × 200. (Micrographs provided by the Regents of University of Michigan Medical School © 2012)

Disorders of the…

Connective tissue: tendinitis

Your opponent stands ready as you prepare to hit the serve, but you are confident that you will smash the ball past your opponent. As you toss the ball high in the air, a burning pain shoots across your wrist and you drop the tennis racket. That dull ache in the wrist that you ignored through the summer is now an unbearable pain. The game is over for now.

After examining your swollen wrist, the doctor in the emergency room announces that you have developed wrist tendinitis. She recommends icing the tender area, taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication to ease the pain and to reduce swelling, and complete rest for a few weeks. She interrupts your protests that you cannot stop playing. She issues a stern warning about the risk of aggravating the condition and the possibility of surgery. She consoles you by mentioning that well known tennis players such as Venus and Serena Williams and Rafael Nadal have also suffered from tendinitis related injuries.

What is tendinitis and how did it happen? Tendinitis is the inflammation of a tendon, the thick band of fibrous connective tissue that attaches a muscle to a bone. The condition causes pain and tenderness in the area around a joint. On rare occasions, a sudden serious injury will cause tendinitis. Most often, the condition results from repetitive motions over time that strain the tendons needed to perform the tasks.

Persons whose jobs and hobbies involve performing the same movements over and over again are often at the greatest risk of tendinitis. You hear of tennis and golfer’s elbow, jumper's knee, and swimmer’s shoulder. In all cases, overuse of the joint causes a microtrauma that initiates the inflammatory response. Tendinitis is routinely diagnosed through a clinical examination. In case of severe pain, X-rays can be examined to rule out the possibility of a bone injury. Severe cases of tendinitis can even tear loose a tendon. Surgical repair of a tendon is painful. Connective tissue in the tendon does not have abundant blood supply and heals slowly.

While older adults are at risk for tendinitis because the elasticity of tendon tissue decreases with age, active people of all ages can develop tendinitis. Young athletes, dancers, and computer operators; anyone who performs the same movements constantly is at risk for tendinitis. Although repetitive motions are unavoidable in many activities and may lead to tendinitis, precautions can be taken that can lessen the probability of developing tendinitis. For active individuals, stretches before exercising and cross training or changing exercises are recommended. For the passionate athlete, it may be time to take some lessons to improve technique. All of the preventive measures aim to increase the strength of the tendon and decrease the stress put on it. With proper rest and managed care, you will be back on the court to hit that slice-spin serve over the net.

Questions & Answers

what are the functions of the liver
Emorut Reply
detoxification formation of blood in the fetus blood reservoir regulations of the body temperature
ibrahim
regulation of the body temperature in the sense that the liver reduce some of the activities so has to maintain the amount of heat generations in the body
ibrahim
explain the advantages and disadvantages of learning anatomy using systemic and regional. help please😫🙏🙏💓
Enock Reply
hello which is the longer tater
Daniel Reply
the inflammation of spinal cord is called
Francis Reply
TM partial transver myelitis
Ayan
Transverse myelitis
Amit
transverse mylitis
Gopi
T M means transeverse myelitis
Ayan
TM
babita
Example of irregular bones in the upper limb
Daniel
what is anatomy
Bruce Reply
is the study of human structure or various parts of the body
Adoma
What is the chordae tendineae and where is located? Where is the Aorta located?
Sovilace Reply
What is the meaning of aponuerosis
Veronica Reply
a sheet of pearly white fibrous tissue that takes the place of a tendon in flat muscles having a wide area of attachment.
Hassan
example of epitheliam tissue
Nirob Reply
what is systemic anatomy
Friday Reply
it's a study of organ structure
Amarachi
definition of anatomy and physiology
Kapil Reply
in anatomy we study about structure of human body........ in physiology we study about function
Zahid
Explain the anatomy
Junaid
structure of heart
Anusha
explain biology
saviour
biology is the science of life. biologists study the structure, function, growth, origin, evolution and distribution of living organisms.
Kadence
how is albino affected
Ujam Reply
what are the important stuff in the papillary layer
Ujam
Melanie's is responsible for the change in the color of the skin
Ujam
what happened when they are badly severed
Ujam
what happened when they are badly severed
Ujam
Examples of glial cells?
Nesh Reply
glial cell s help in the attractive foces of motion in the cellular network
Ujam
What is glial cell?
Esther
what is gland
Nirob
a gland is a group of cells or group of similar cells that secretes substances
Veronica
what is homeostasis
Laura Reply
homeostasis- The ability to maintain relatively stable internal conditions even though the outside world changes continuously. i,e, maintaining normal values in your body such as Adequate blood levels,blood pressure, heart activity and blood pressure.
Williams
thank you
Laura
Give atleast three reasons to study anatomy and physiology
George Reply
It helps to know about the body structure properly and administer proper care for the patient
Opeyemi
what's augmentin
Aphet Reply
augmentin is a type of combination antibiotic.
wintana

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Source:  OpenStax, Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 04, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11496/1.8
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