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Small intestine

This diagram shows the small intestine. The different parts of the small intestine are labeled.
The three regions of the small intestine are the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum.

The jejunum    is about 0.9 meters (3 feet) long (in life) and runs from the duodenum to the ileum. Jejunum means “empty” in Latin and supposedly was so named by the ancient Greeks who noticed it was always empty at death. No clear demarcation exists between the jejunum and the final segment of the small intestine, the ileum.

The ileum    is the longest part of the small intestine, measuring about 1.8 meters (6 feet) in length. It is thicker, more vascular, and has more developed mucosal folds than the jejunum. The ileum joins the cecum, the first portion of the large intestine, at the ileocecal sphincter    (or valve). The jejunum and ileum are tethered to the posterior abdominal wall by the mesentery. The large intestine frames these three parts of the small intestine.

Parasympathetic nerve fibers from the vagus nerve and sympathetic nerve fibers from the thoracic splanchnic nerve provide extrinsic innervation to the small intestine. The superior mesenteric artery is its main arterial supply. Veins run parallel to the arteries and drain into the superior mesenteric vein. Nutrient-rich blood from the small intestine is then carried to the liver via the hepatic portal vein.

Histology

The wall of the small intestine is composed of the same four layers typically present in the alimentary system. However, three features of the mucosa and submucosa are unique. These features, which increase the absorptive surface area of the small intestine more than 600-fold, include circular folds, villi, and microvilli ( [link] ). These adaptations are most abundant in the proximal two-thirds of the small intestine, where the majority of absorption occurs.

Histology of the small intestine

Illustration (a) shows the histological cross-section of the small intestine. The left panel shows a small region of the small intestine, along with the blood vessels and the muscle layers. The middle panel shows a magnified view of a small region of the small intestine, highlighting the absorptive cells, the lacteal and the goblet cells. The right panel shows a further magnified view of the epithelial cells including the microvilli. Illustrations (b) shows a micrograph of the circular folds, and illustration (c) shows a micrograph of the villi. Illustration (d) shows an electron micrograph of the microvilli.
(a) The absorptive surface of the small intestine is vastly enlarged by the presence of circular folds, villi, and microvilli. (b) Micrograph of the circular folds. (c) Micrograph of the villi. (d) Electron micrograph of the microvilli. From left to right, LM x 56, LM x 508, EM x 196,000. (credit b-d: Micrograph provided by the Regents of University of Michigan Medical School © 2012)

Circular folds

Also called a plica circulare, a circular fold    is a deep ridge in the mucosa and submucosa. Beginning near the proximal part of the duodenum and ending near the middle of the ileum, these folds facilitate absorption. Their shape causes the chyme to spiral, rather than move in a straight line, through the small intestine. Spiraling slows the movement of chyme and provides the time needed for nutrients to be fully absorbed.

Villi

Within the circular folds are small (0.5–1 mm long) hairlike vascularized projections called villi (singular = villus) that give the mucosa a furry texture. There are about 20 to 40 villi per square millimeter, increasing the surface area of the epithelium tremendously. The mucosal epithelium, primarily composed of absorptive cells, covers the villi. In addition to muscle and connective tissue to support its structure, each villus contains a capillary bed composed of one arteriole and one venule, as well as a lymphatic capillary called a lacteal    . The breakdown products of carbohydrates and proteins (sugars and amino acids) can enter the bloodstream directly, but lipid breakdown products are absorbed by the lacteals and transported to the bloodstream via the lymphatic system.

Questions & Answers

Describe the system s that maintain the internal environment of a human body
Nora Reply
an organism is a living being that had a cellular structure and that can independently perform all physiological functions needed for life.
Nwecho Reply
a tissue is a group of similar cells that work together to perform a particular function
Nwecho
chemical level, cellular level, tissue level, organs level, organ systems, organisms
Nwecho Reply
they're reproduction but also produces hormones dus they're endocrine system
Nwecho
cells are smallest independent functional unit of a living organism
Nwecho
an organ is an anatomically distinct structure of the body composed of two or more tissue
Nwecho
What is a cavity
Isaac Reply
Permanently damaged areas in teeth that develop into tiny holes
MASLAH
what is meant by epithelial tissue
Zahid
What is the difference between regional anatomy and systematic anatomy?
Andrew Reply
Regional anatomy is the study of the interrelationships of all of the structures in a specific body region, such as the abdomen. ... In contrast, systemic anatomy is the study of the structures that make up a discrete body system—that is, a group of structures that work together to perform a unique
Tammy
Pls is that all
Petra
regional anatomy studies structures that contribute to specific body region example the thoracic region while systematic anatomy studies structures that contribute to specific body systems example respiratory system
Nwecho
so meaning of dissect
Mary Reply
it is the dismembering or the cutting of living organism to study the anatomical structure of it body
Kwasi
what are lymph nodes
Memory Reply
what is the best book that shows unit 1 about cell unit 2 about tissue unit 3 about embroyology
Abraham Reply
2
Hellen
to understand structure of body able to understand function of system. to understand how to build human body and function
Dereje Reply
hi
Neela
to determine body structures
Petra Reply
to know the use of each and every part of our body
Petra
to understand how our body structures work to support our lives
Petra
Is this a question?
Tammy
So what was the question?
Thamie
All the body work together to make the whole organism life possible
Kwasi
what is the importance of conversation
Hellen
To be able to identify the parts of the body and their functions
Hodasi
ok
Hodasi
Ideas are shared during conversation also informations are given
Hodasi
it reduces cost
Kwasi
what is carbon dioxide respiratory system why?
Prachi Reply
Carbon dioxide (CO2) is involved with the chemical process of cellular respiration. It is produced as a cellular waste product during the decomposition reactions and serves an important role in maintaining the appropriate acid-base balance in the body.
Tammy
thank you
Prachi
You're welcome!
Tammy
i have not under stood human heart
Simbwa Reply
means?
Dilshan
why a man became wild at the time of sexual intercourse. reason?
Soul
what is anatomy
philemon Reply
what is anatomy in terms of medicine
philemon
it is the study of human and animal form by observing and examined them and sometimes dissecting them and view the tiny thing by the use of microscope
Kwasi
anatomy is simply the scientific study of the body's structures
Petra
study of human body and animal
Crystal
why a man becomes wild at the time of sexual intercourse
Soul
Anatomy is the study of structure of the human body.
Tammy
Physiology is the study of the functions of the human body
Tammy
what is the difference between regional anatomy and systematic anatomy?
Andrew
study of body And animal structure.
Sohail
Describe early studies into the working of human body.
Tonny Reply
please guys help me to answer this question; Define the two divisions of the skeleton ?
Jonathan Reply
two example of appendicular skeleton
Jonathan
upper limb ;eg humerus n lower limb;eg tibia
BRIAN

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Source:  OpenStax, Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 04, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11496/1.8
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