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The brain case consists of eight bones. These include the paired parietal and temporal bones, plus the unpaired frontal, occipital, sphenoid, and ethmoid bones.

Parietal bone

The parietal bone    forms most of the upper lateral side of the skull (see [link] ). These are paired bones, with the right and left parietal bones joining together at the top of the skull. Each parietal bone is also bounded anteriorly by the frontal bone, inferiorly by the temporal bone, and posteriorly by the occipital bone.

Temporal bone

The temporal bone    forms the lower lateral side of the skull (see [link] ). Common wisdom has it that the temporal bone (temporal = “time”) is so named because this area of the head (the temple) is where hair typically first turns gray, indicating the passage of time.

The temporal bone is subdivided into several regions ( [link] ). The flattened, upper portion is the squamous portion of the temporal bone. Below this area and projecting anteriorly is the zygomatic process of the temporal bone, which forms the posterior portion of the zygomatic arch. Posteriorly is the mastoid portion of the temporal bone. Projecting inferiorly from this region is a large prominence, the mastoid process    , which serves as a muscle attachment site. The mastoid process can easily be felt on the side of the head just behind your earlobe. On the interior of the skull, the petrous portion of each temporal bone forms the prominent, diagonally oriented petrous ridge    in the floor of the cranial cavity. Located inside each petrous ridge are small cavities that house the structures of the middle and inner ears.

Temporal bone

This image shows the location of the temporal bone. A small image of the skull on the top left shows the temporal bone highlighted in pink and a magnified view of this region then highlights the important parts of the temporal bone.
A lateral view of the isolated temporal bone shows the squamous, mastoid, and zygomatic portions of the temporal bone.

Important landmarks of the temporal bone, as shown in [link] , include the following:

  • External acoustic meatus (ear canal)—This is the large opening on the lateral side of the skull that is associated with the ear.
  • Internal acoustic meatus —This opening is located inside the cranial cavity, on the medial side of the petrous ridge. It connects to the middle and inner ear cavities of the temporal bone.
  • Mandibular fossa —This is the deep, oval-shaped depression located on the external base of the skull, just in front of the external acoustic meatus. The mandible (lower jaw) joins with the skull at this site as part of the temporomandibular joint, which allows for movements of the mandible during opening and closing of the mouth.
  • Articular tubercle —The smooth ridge located immediately anterior to the mandibular fossa. Both the articular tubercle and mandibular fossa contribute to the temporomandibular joint, the joint that provides for movements between the temporal bone of the skull and the mandible.
  • Styloid process —Posterior to the mandibular fossa on the external base of the skull is an elongated, downward bony projection called the styloid process, so named because of its resemblance to a stylus (a pen or writing tool). This structure serves as an attachment site for several small muscles and for a ligament that supports the hyoid bone of the neck. (See also [link] .)
  • Stylomastoid foramen —This small opening is located between the styloid process and mastoid process. This is the point of exit for the cranial nerve that supplies the facial muscles.
  • Carotid canal —The carotid canal is a zig-zag shaped tunnel that provides passage through the base of the skull for one of the major arteries that supplies the brain. Its entrance is located on the outside base of the skull, anteromedial to the styloid process. The canal then runs anteromedially within the bony base of the skull, and then turns upward to its exit in the floor of the middle cranial cavity, above the foramen lacerum.

Questions & Answers

list down all the hormones secreted by adrenal gland
Odong Reply
The amount of blood pumped by the left ventricle of the heart in one contraction.
Javid Reply
how we can calculate the cardiac output
khater
and how do we calculate the strock valume
khater
stroke volume is not all the blood contained in the left ventricle; normally, only about two-thirds of the blood in the ventricle is expelled with each beat.
Javid
Cardiac output 5.5 l S. V 68.75 ml H. R 80bpm
Javid
If we consider SV 70, end systolic vol is about 15% of total(approx always) out of a total of 80-85 ml only 70ml is pumped per systole
Kartik
what is macrophages?and its function
Sajjad Reply
macrophages they are white blood cells that engulf dead cells in the body
patience
what is power stroke?
muravha
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patience
what is the stroke volume of heart?
up
If an autoimmune disorder targets the alpha cells, production of which hormone would be directly affected?
Samantha Reply
what is a muscle?
Gideon Reply
A band or bundle of fibrous tissue in a human or animal body that has the ability to contract, producing movement in or maintaining the position of parts of the body
Mody
ok
Gideon
what's endolphthamities and panophthalmities?
Gideon
fluid around the brain
louise Reply
what ?
Asif
cerebro spinal fluid
Bhupender
The brain and spinal cord are surrounded by a clear fluid called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This fluid is produced and stored in cavities in the brain called ventricles. It circulatesaround the brain, moving from ventricle to ventricle. ... Hydrocephalus is a condition in which there is too much CSF
Archie
what is hydrocphalus
aminul Reply
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Bhupender
when cerebrospinal fluid produce în the brain, i.e. brain ventricles, is to abundent in the brain and is not trăind out of the brain. as a consequence this lichid pute mechanical pressure oñ the brain and it pushes the cerebrum tissue. as a consequence this pressure on the neuronscan cause neurologi
Centerkinet
cal disfunctions, for example clinical headache
Centerkinet
. It is posible to drainout the fluid through a device dalles shunt,as i remember.
Centerkinet
but where are also home medicinsfor decreasing the production of cerebrospin.fluid etc
Centerkinet
there are some medicines that can decrease the production of csf
Centerkinet
a neurologist advice is needed
Centerkinet
i wrote some medicines NOT home medicines. it is a serious condition and specialized medical advice is needed. of course also general medical knowledge may be helpful, but not enough, a specialist is neede
Centerkinet
if anyone help me in physiology
Radika Reply
i am BSN student of first year which book is best for physiology
Radika
i am BSN student of first year which book is best for physiology
Radika
ross and wilson anotomy and physiology
Sajjad
it's 1 book for anotomy and physiology it's best for bs nursing
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yes Ross and wilson physiology is better for study
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I'm also the student of bs nursing
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I study guiton and hall &ganong
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I'm also midwif help me be the best book for midwif
nimco
what ia the function of indocrine system
sheraz
salam all friend
sheraz
help me with this question; explain at least five emergency acute pain found in fundamental emergency medicine
Christon
Fascial compartment of forearm
Hidayatullah
what's a tissue?
Mwape Reply
a group of cells with the same function
Dee
tissue is a group of cells that perform the same functions.
Rashid
explain a bit about a tissue
Mwape
A tissue is made up of cells that are similar in shape and perform the same function, for instance brain cells form up a brain tissue. Whereas a group of tissues that perform the same function form an organ... so in this case the brain which is the organ is formed as a result of brain tissues.
Isaac
what is gross anatomy
Joseph
the branch of anatomy that deals with the structure of organs and tissues that are visible to the naked eye.
Archie
1.To know how the structures functions. 2.To easily identify the micro structures and the macro structures. 3.To be able to explain that anatomy is the study of the structures and physiology is the study of how the structures functions
Abban Reply
Describe the two classes of hormones (3 with subclasses) and how they affect their target cells.
Shalaeha Reply
what is control centre
Gohil Reply
Angie The larger air passage of the lung is
Angie Reply
guys help to make me understand the structure of the skin
Olokojo Reply
the skin has three layers epidermis,dermis,and subcutaneous tissue
Antony
guys what is esrf
Antony
End Stage of Renal Failure
sheraz
what's the meaning of OPD
Sintung
Out Patient Department
Shahab
the skin has the assesory structures.that is, sebaceous glands, sweat glands, hairs, nails,blood vessels and lymph vessels.
Mutebe
yh
Gideon
define cell and give it's brief description of the orgenelles
Manish Reply
a cell is a basic unit of life
emmanuella
what about philosophy
Smart
the organelle is a membrane bound structure in the cell that performs a particular function
emmanuella
Cell.Is a basic functional unit of life. it has the organelles, Golgi apparatus, smooth endoplasmic membrane, rough endoplasmic reticular,Lysosomes, mitochondrial and others.
Mutebe

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Source:  OpenStax, Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 04, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11496/1.8
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