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By the end of this section, you will be able to:
  • Identify the axial muscles of the face, head, and neck
  • Identify the movement and function of the face, head, and neck muscles

The skeletal muscles are divided into axial    (muscles of the trunk and head) and appendicular    (muscles of the arms and legs) categories. This system reflects the bones of the skeleton system, which are also arranged in this manner. The axial muscles are grouped based on location, function, or both. Some of the axial muscles may seem to blur the boundaries because they cross over to the appendicular skeleton. The first grouping of the axial muscles you will review includes the muscles of the head and neck, then you will review the muscles of the vertebral column, and finally you will review the oblique and rectus muscles.

Muscles that create facial expression

The origins of the muscles of facial expression are on the surface of the skull (remember, the origin of a muscle does not move). The insertions of these muscles have fibers intertwined with connective tissue and the dermis of the skin. Because the muscles insert in the skin rather than on bone, when they contract, the skin moves to create facial expression ( [link] ).

Muscles of facial expression

The left panel in this figure shows the anterior view of the facial muscles, and the right panel shows the lateral view.
Many of the muscles of facial expression insert into the skin surrounding the eyelids, nose and mouth, producing facial expressions by moving the skin rather than bones.

The orbicularis oris    is a circular muscle that moves the lips, and the orbicularis oculi    is a circular muscle that closes the eye. The occipitofrontalis    muscle moves up the scalp and eyebrows. The muscle has a frontal belly and an occipital (near the occipital bone on the posterior part of the skull) belly. In other words, there is a muscle on the forehead ( frontalis    ) and one on the back of the head ( occipitalis    ), but there is no muscle across the top of the head. Instead, the two bellies are connected by a broad tendon called the epicranial aponeurosis    , or galea aponeurosis (galea = “apple”). The physicians originally studying human anatomy thought the skull looked like an apple.

The majority of the face is composed of the buccinator    muscle, which compresses the cheek. This muscle allows you to whistle, blow, and suck; and it contributes to the action of chewing. There are several small facial muscles, one of which is the corrugator supercilii    , which is the prime mover of the eyebrows. Place your finger on your eyebrows at the point of the bridge of the nose. Raise your eyebrows as if you were surprised and lower your eyebrows as if you were frowning. With these movements, you can feel the action of the corrugator supercilli. Additional muscles of facial expression are presented in [link] .

Muscles in facial expression

This table describes the muscles used in facial expressions. To furrow the brow, the skin of the scalp moves in an anterior direction. The prime mover is the occipitofrontalis frontal belly, which originates from the epicraneal aponeurosis and inserts underneath the skin of the forehead. To unfurrow the brow, the skin of the scalp moves in the posterior direction. The prime mover is the occipitofrontalis occipital belly, which originates from the occipital bone and the mastoid process of the temporal bone and inserts into the epicraneal aponeurosis. To lower the eyebrows, as when scowling or frowning, the skin underneath the eyebrows moves in an inferior direction. The prime mover is the corrugator supercilii, which originates from the frontal bone and inserts into the skin underneath the eyebrow. To flare the nostrils, the nasal cartilage is compressed in an inferior and posterior direction. The prime mover is the nasalis, which originates from the maxilla and inserts into the nasal bone. Raising the upper lip involves elevating the upper lip tissue. The prime mover is the levator labii superioris, which originates from the maxilla and inserts underneath the skin at the corners of the mouth and also into the orbicularis oris. Lowering the lower lip involves depressing the lip and also moving it laterally. The prime mover is the depressor angulus oris, which originates from the mandible and inserts underneath the skin of the lower lip. Opening the mouth and sliding the lower jaw left and right involves depressing the lower jaw and also moving it laterally. The prime mover is thecdepressor angulus oris, which originates from the mandible and inserts underneath the skin at the corners of the mouth. Smiling involves elevating the corners of the mouth and also moving them in a lateral direction. The prime mover is the zygomaticus major, which originates from the zygomatic bone and inserts underneath the skin at the corners of the mouth in the dimple area, and also into the orbicularis oris. Shaping of the lips as during speech involves moving the lips in multiple directions. The prime mover is the orbicularis oris which originates from the tissue surrounding the lips and inserts underneath the skin at the corners of the mouth. Lateral movement of the cheeks such as when sucking on a straw or to compress air in the mouth while blowing involves moving the cheeks in a lateral direction. The prime mover is the buccinator, which originates from the maxilla, the mandible, and the sphenoid bone via the pterygomandibular raphae, and inserts into the orbicularis oris. Pursing of the lips by straightening them laterally involves moving the corners of the mouth in a lateral direction. The prime mover is the risorius, which originates from the fascia of the parotid salivary gland and inserts underneath the skin at the corners of the mouth. Protrusion of the lower lip, as when making a pouting expression, involves protracting the lower lip and the skin of the chin. The prime mover is the mentalis, which originates from the mandible and inserts underneath the skin of the chin.

Muscles that move the eyes

The movement of the eyeball is under the control of the extrinsic eye muscles    , which originate outside the eye and insert onto the outer surface of the white of the eye. These muscles are located inside the eye socket and cannot be seen on any part of the visible eyeball ( [link] and [link] ). If you have ever been to a doctor who held up a finger and asked you to follow it up, down, and to both sides, he or she is checking to make sure your eye muscles are acting in a coordinated pattern.

Questions & Answers

How does blood circulate in the upper limbs
Mary Reply
describe the muscles found in the heart
Atotwe Reply
myocardial
Kenndy
thank you very much
Atotwe
asalamu aleikum
Cabdala
waalekum salam
Tifu
types of connective tissues?
Tifu
what is a muscular system and details about it
Jackson Reply
what is the type of homones responseble for blenking of eyes
Moses Reply
what are the functions of cell?
Keyirangzile Reply
how does the femur act as a lever?
Mutoni Reply
what is stumac
Abdussalam Reply
What is phagocytosis
Mohamed Reply
Phagocytosis, process by which certain living cells called phagocyte
Sadashiv
It is the process that is carried out by the immune system of the body, that certain specialized immune cells (macrophages, Nks, dendritic cells, etc) that engulf and neutralize the foreign substances that invades the body.
Wesley
So that they can be predicate out of the body.
Wesley
phagocytosis is the process by which living cell or yh plasma membrane engulf large molecules into it internal environment ... it also known as food feeding
Boateng
all that you are say what does it mean?
Dzah
simply is the way the immune system fights foreign bodies by engulfing them..
Dzah
by the help of the immune cells...
Dzah
The process by which a cell engulfs particles such as bacteria, other microorganisms, debris of dead cell.e.g: neutrophils and monocytes (types of white blood cells)
Tifu
what are the six types of connective tissues
Athieno Reply
loose and dense , cartilage and bone , blood and lymph
Queen
describe the structure of the liver
Atwebembeire Reply
what is specific name for spinal cord
Stanley Reply
what is the best description for skeletal muscular
Stanley
what is the best description for skeletal muscular
Stanley
costs of bones of skeleton, their joint s and voluntary
grace
what are examples of long bones
grace
example of long bones will be the femur tibia and humerus and even radius
Nina
so basically long bones are mostly in you hands and feets
Nina
skeletal muscular are voluntary and are attached to the bone by tendon which help maintain the posture and position of the body and it also protects internal organs in the abdominal region
Nina
The specific name for spinal cord is coccygeal segment
Sandra
what are the hormones responseble for blenking of eyes.
Moses
Smallest unit of life
Kimberly Reply
cell
Adnan
The cell is the smallest structural and functional unit of living organisms, which can exist on its own. Therefore, it is sometimes called the building block of life. Some organisms, such as bacteria or yeast, are unicellular—consisting only of a single cell—while others, for instance, mammalians, a
Adnan
cells are the building blocks of life
Stanley
Describe the complications of fracture
Zaifa Reply
functions of connective tissue
renah Reply
binding and structural support protection Insulation Transport of materials
Priyantha
Is there any artery that carries oxygenated blood? what's the name?
Sayo
Deoxygenated blood enters the right atrium from the vena cava. Blood moves into right ventricle. Blood is pumped into the pulmonary artery. The pulmonary artery carries deoxygenated blood to the lungs. The blood becomes oxygenated in the lungs. Oxygenated blood leaves the lung via the pulmonary
Danni
all arteries carry oxygenated blood except pulmonary artery
SAMSON
protection,,,,,transport,,,,,,connection,,,,,,,support,,,,,these are functions of connective tissue
Tifu
and insulation
Tifu
what is a local potential
Nandi Reply
potential of neurons
vipin
response of neurons against sodium ion Chanel
vipin
The resting membrane potential of a neuron is about -70 mV (mV=millivolt) - this means that the inside of the neuron is 70 mV less than the outside. At rest, there are relatively more sodium ions outside the neuron and more potassium ions inside that neuron.
Adnan

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Source:  OpenStax, Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 04, 2016 Download for free at http://legacy.cnx.org/content/col11496/1.8
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